History Podcasts

Charles Murphy

Charles Murphy

Charles Murphy was born in New York City in 1858. The owner of several saloons in the city, he took a keen interest in politics and was a member of the Democratic Party.

Murphy's prominence in the Tammany Society enabled him to become New York's dock commissioner. When Richard Croker was defeated by Seith Low in 1901, Murphy became the leader of the Tammany political machine. Over the next few years Murphy brought about the election of three New York City mayors, George B. McCellan, William Jay Gaynor and John F. Hylan and helped establish the careers of Alfred E. Smith and Robert F. Wagner. Murphy died in 1924.


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How the “Code Authority” Kept LGBT Characters Out of Comics

From 1954 to 1989, mainstream U.S. comic books had rules against portraying LGBT characters, enforced by the organization known as the Comics Code Authority. The Code, as it was often simply called, was not technically government censorship, as it was a private organization and publishers were not legally bound to follow its decisions. 

But newsstands and shops weren’t going to risk carrying a comic book without the Code’s approval any more than large commercial movie theaters are anxious to show films that don’t have some rating and approval from the MPAA. Because of this, mainstream comic stories were restricted for decades, and it wasn’t until 1989 that a gay, bi, queer or transgender superhero was allowed to openly appear in mainstream American comic books produced by companies such as Marvel and DC.

The American comic book industry began in the 1930s and the superhero genre truly took off after Superman’s debut in �tion Comics #1” in 1938. Following WWII, superheroes fell out of popularity and by the 1950s most had vanished, to be revived or reimagined in later years when the Atomic Age and the Space Race inspired new imagined threats and horizons. The U.S. began to experience a newfound fear of communism and anything that threatened “traditional American values.”

Ten years after Superman’s debut as the 𠇌hampion of the oppressed,” psychiatrist Dr. Frederic Wertham began writing and speaking publicly about how mass media—particularly comic books𠅌ould corrupt American children. He specifically targeted horror comics and, to a lesser degree, superhero stories for allegedly containing subversive messages encouraging crime, violence, loose sexual morals, anarchy, homosexuality and a confusion of gender roles. 

He stirred up a lot of hate and fear towards comic books, and groups of concerned parents and others who believed these stories threatened “traditional” American values joined Wertham’s cause, even holding comic book burnings in the street.

Senators Thomas D. Hennings, Estes Kefauver, Robert C. Hendrickson and Ricard Clendenen, look over sample covers of comic books at a New York hearing of a Senate sub-committee. (Credit: Bettmann/Getty Images)

In 1954, Dr. Wertham published the now-infamous book Seduction of the Innocent wherein he said, “I think Hitler was a beginner compared to the comic-book industry.” The book presented his conclusions based on his own research with children, and included comic book panels and dialogue, but many of these examples were taken out of context and in some cases outright misrepresented.

In 2013, Carol Tilley, a professor of library and information science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, went through Wertham’s research and found that he had falsified some of his research, altering testimony and data in order to support his conclusions. But In the 1940s and 50s, this was not yet known nor even suspected by those who heard Wertham’s message and accepted it.

Soon after the publication of Seduction of the Innocent, Wertham spoke before the Senate Subcommittee on Juvenile Delinquency and testified that comic books were a major cause of juvenile crimes. There was no ruling advocating government intervention or censorship, but the subcommittee report stated that the comic book industry needed to address how their stories could adversely affect the American public.

In response, the Comics Magazine Association of America formed as a new industry trade group, and created the Comics Code Authority. The Code had many rules on how characters could appear physically, how violence was to be handled and how authority and government figures could be portrayed. Supernatural beings (except for sorcerers and magic-users who did not invoke the Devil) were banned. Unless it involved super-powers or impossible technology, you could not show how crimes were committed. Drugs were banned entirely. And three rules dealt with how sex and love were to be portrayed:

  • “Illicit sex relations are neither to be hinted at or portrayed. Violent love scenes, as well as sexual abnormalities are unacceptable.”
  • “The treatment of love-romance stories shall emphasize the value of home and the sanctity of marriage.”
  • “Sex perversion or any inference to same is strictly forbidden.”

You might wonder, what was the Code’s definition of “sex perversion” and “sexual abnormalities”? What was the line for what makes a sex relation “illicit”? Well, all of that was up to the Comics Code Authority Administrator or whomever was working in the office that day. There were no written definitions, no list of previous rulings to argue precedent. They would tell you if something was unacceptable and that was usually that.

Charles F. Murphy, poses in front of two illustrations showing the changes in a comic strip character due to the comic book code. (Credit: Bettmann/Getty Images)

Put together, these three rules on love and sex meant that LGBT characters were out of mainstream comics. A year before the Code came into being, “Space Adventures #3” from Charlton Comics depicted a scientist who undergoes sex reassignment surgery. This story, likely inspired by the recent news surrounding Christine Jorgensen, who underwent the procedure in Denmark, would now be prohibited from being published under the Code.

Under the Code, Catwoman was not an appropriate love interest for Batman since she was a criminal. But DC felt a love interest was needed to combat Wertham’s accusations that the adult Bruce Wayne and his adopted adolescent ward Dick Grayson were in a sexual relationship. So Catwoman was dropped from the comics and would not appear again until 12 years later in 1966, while Batman met new love interest Kathy Kane AKA Batwoman in 1956. Later on, her niece Betty Kane became Bat-Girl in order to win Robin’s heart.

In 1971, several of the Code’s guidelines were revised and a few were dropped, ushering in a new wave of social commentary stories and supernatural characters, but LGBT content was still out of bounds. This, of course, did not stop fan speculation. In 1979, Marvel introduced a team called Alpha Flight. When the team later got its own series, co-creator John Byrne decided that Alpha Flight member Jean-Paul Beaubier, also called Northstar, was gay. However, he did not reveal this directly in the stories, both due to the code and, as he claims, due to then Marvel Editor-in-Chief Jim Shooter personally telling him this would not be allowed.

While superheroes and villains weren’t allowed to be directly identified as LGBT, Marvel and DC could get around this by producing special books with a “mature readers” label. In the mainstream comics, supporting characters had a little more freedom. 


Murphy Oil Corp. history, profile and history video

Murphy Oil Corp. operates as a holding company, which through its subsidiaries engages in the exploration and production of oil and gas. The company has retail and wholesale gasoline marketing operations in the United States and refining and marketing operations in the United Kingdom. Its operations are classified into two business activities: Exploration & Production and Refining & Marketing. The Exploration & Production business engages in the exploration and production of crude oil, natural gas and natural gas liquids. The Refining & Marketing business engages in the business of refining crude oil and other feed stocks into petroleum products such as gasoline and distillates buy and sell crude oil and refined products, and transport and market petroleum products. The company’s business root back to 1907 and was founded by Charles H. Murphy, Jr. in 1950 and is headquartered in El Dorado, AR. “


Charles H. Murphy Jr. (1920–2002)

Charles Haywood Murphy Jr. became the leader of his family businesses in 1941 at the age of twenty-one after his father suffered a stroke. Under his leadership, the family ownership of timber land, oil interests, and banking in southern Arkansas eventually became the Murphy Oil Corporation, a company with international operations.

Charles H. Murphy Jr. was born in El Dorado (Union County) on March 6, 1920, to Charles Haywood Murphy Sr. and Bertie Wilson Murphy. He had three sisters. In 1904, his father moved to El Dorado (Union County) to operate a bank and, by 1907, owned thirteen banks in Arkansas and the Indian Territory. Subsequently, he built a sawmill at Cargile (Union County), south of El Dorado, and then a railroad to supply the mill with timber from north Louisiana and areas in south Arkansas. Land acquisitions in south Arkansas and north Louisiana led to oil exploration ventures, which provided royalties and operating interests. Murphy’s father had him manumitted by court order at the age of sixteen so that he could legally transact business for himself, and Murphy entered the petroleum industry as an independent operator—not affiliated with some of the major companies already operating in the area—while in his teen years. When his father had a stroke in 1941, Murphy had to take over management of the various businesses.

Murphy attended the Gulf Coast Military Academy at age sixteen and then received extensive tutoring, primarily in French. He was a voracious reader. Murphy graduated from El Dorado High School in 1938 and married Johnnie Azelle Walker on October 12, 1938, and they resided in El Dorado. They had three sons and one daughter. He spent three years in the army during World War II and returned to lead the Murphy businesses, having selected M. C. Hoover to run them in his absence.

In 1946, Murphy and his siblings—Caroline M. Keller, Bertie M. Deming, and Theodosia M. Nolan—pooled their business interests into C. H. Murphy & Company. Murphy was selected as the managing partner. In 1950, C. H. Murphy & Company was incorporated as Murphy Corporation with Murphy as president, a position he held until 1972 he also served as chairman of the board until 1994.

Murphy Corporation developed oil properties in several states and also participated in the development of oil-producing properties in the Gulf of Mexico, the North Sea, Canada, and Venezuela. Early entry in potential operations and vigorous leadership made Murphy Oil a viable corporation.

Murphy was also a major shareholder in the First National Bank of El Dorado when this was acquired by First United Bancshares, Murphy served as chairman of the board. (First United Bancshares was, in turn, succeeded by BancorpSouth.) He served as chairman of the National Petroleum Council and as a director of the American Petroleum Institute. He also served seventeen years on the Arkansas Board of Higher Education, served ten years as a trustee of Hendrix College, and established the Murphy Institute of Political Economy at Tulane University in 1980. He served as a director of the Smithsonian Institution and as a trustee of the Ochsner Medical Institution.

Beyond serving on boards and providing funding, he was active as a lecturer on economics, responsible civic actions, energy, and education, never charging a fee. Among his many lectures were “The Effect of Environment on Business Strategy” at the University of Geneva in Switzerland, “Energy Alternatives for the Mid-21 st Century” at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington DC, and “Reading, Writing and Thinking” at El Dorado High School.

Murphy also enjoyed yachting and wrote two books on the subject, Yachting Smart and Yachting Far.

Murphy died at his home in El Dorado on March 20, 2002, at the age of eighty-two and is buried at Arlington Cemetery in El Dorado.

For additional information:
Murphy Oil Corporation: A Story of Innovation. El Dorado, AR: Murphy Oil Corporation, 1994.

Obituary of Charles H. Murphy Jr. Arkansas Democrat-Gazette. March 24, 2002, p. 9B.

Obituary of Charles H. Murphy Jr. El Dorado News-Times. March 22, 2002, p. 3A.


Charles Murphy - History

HISTORY OF THE COMMUNITY

The first inhabitants of northeast Missouri were native Americans, the Sax and the Missouris. Explorers and traders established camps along the Mississippi in the late 17th century. Father Hennepin, a French Monk, making his way down the Illinois River in 1681 to the Mississippi, landed near what is now called &ldquoBayview,&rdquo a campground between Hannibal and Palmyra. For many years it was called the Bay de Charles. Father Hennepin erected a cross and claimed the land for the King of France.

R. I. Holcombe&rsquos HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY published in 1884 (reprinted in 2003) includes the following excerpts describing Palmyra&rsquos beginnings:

&ldquoThe city of Palmyra, the county seat or capital of Marion County, is situated on portions of sections 23, 24, 25, and 26 in township 58, range 6. It is seven miles due west of the Mississippi river, the same distance from the southern boundary of the county, ten miles from the northern boundary, and sixteen from the western. It is twelve miles northwest from Hannibal and sixteen southwest of Quincy as the crow flies.
&ldquoThe location is beautiful&mdashon an elevation on both sides of a spring branch, which rises in the town and flows from west to east. The original town plat, except on e street, is upon the south side of the little stream. The latter, fed by two springs mainly, furnishes an abundance of water to supply the ordinary needs of the community.
&ldquoThe town is well built, and well laid out. The streets are broad and roomy, and rest upon a natural rock foundation. All of the main streets are graded and stone guttered and provided with sidewalks. Drainage is so well established that the streets are always easily traversable. The majority of the residences are substantial, and many are imposing and attractive&mdashthe abodes of competence, refinement, and culture.
&ldquoIn November, 1818, Benjamin Vanlandingham came from Kentucky to what is now Marion county. With him came his sons Lewis, Meshach and William. His sons and some of the other settlers assisted him and he built a cabin a little southwest of the big spring, and moved in the same fall.
&ldquoThe town grew rapidly, and in 1820 Palmyra had 150 inhabitants. Those interested made efforts to increase the number of settlers, and in 1821 the first post-office was established, the mail coming, when it did come, from St. Louis on horseback by way of New London.
&ldquoMaj. Obadiah Dickerson was the first postmaster. He kept the office in his hat a great portion of the time. Being frequently absent from home, in the woods hunting, or attending some public gathering of the settlers, the few letters constituting &ldquothe mail&rdquo were deposited under the lining of his huge bell-crown hat, often made a receptacle for papers, documents, handkerchiefs, etc., by gentlemen of the olden time. Asked why he carried the office about with him in this way, the old major replied: &lsquoSo that if I meet a man who has a letter belonging to him I can give it to him, sir! I meet more men when I travel about than come to the office when I stay at home.&rsquo As the mail at the Palmyra office increased, the major petitioned the department for a new and a larger hat!&rdquo

A log cabin now marks the spot where, in 1818, Benjamin Vanlandingham settled his family by the &ldquoBig Spring&rdquo in a home constructed from hand-hewn logs taken from the deep forest that surrounded the town. By 1919, the town of Palmyra had been laid out in the form of a parallelogram. The original streets going north and south were Bradley, Spring, Dickerson, Main, Lane, Home and Last. Streets going east and west were Olive, Lafayette, Main Cross, and Water. In 1820, the first store was opened by James Vaughn. He sold powder, lead, a few groceries, coffee, pepper, salt, coarse muslins and woolens, some cutlery, and a small assortment of &ldquonotions.&rdquo In 1822 the first frame house was built in the city.

Historic buildings
Establishing the land office in Palmyra in 1825 led to continued and rapid growth. Between 1825 and 1858 over three million acres of land were sold through the Palmyra Land Office. William Carson was appointed first registrar and Henry Lane first receiver. Settlers from Kentucky, Virginia, and Tennessee cleared the forest and planted crops of corn, oats, hemp, tobacco and other crops. In 1826, the County of Marion was organized and in 1827 the county seat was established in Palmyra Moses D. Bates and David A. Bates donated a parcel of land south of the spring to be used for the Seat of Justice. Initially, it was a public square, with buildings to be constructed to conduct
county business. Three courthouses have stood on this spot, the first being constructed in 1835 the present courthouse, the third, has stood on this spot for over 100 years.



Marion County Courthouse
built in 1900



Land Office, now the
Palmyra Nutrition Center

In 1829 a hotel and tavern was built on South Main that became a stagecoach stop between St. Charles, Mo. and Des Moines, Iowa. With community support, Heritage Seekers, a local historical organization, maintains the Gardner House, which now serves as a local museum and community information center. A narrative walking tour of the business and historic district developed by a local Boy Scout as his Eagle Scout project is available at Gardner House.


Gardner House, 1828


In 1829 the first church, the Methodist, was organized in Palmyra.
In August of 1830 the town of Palmyra was incorporated. There were, by then, seven lawyers, four doctors, and three taverns. In 1832 the first newspaper, &ldquothe Missouri Courier,&rdquo was established. In 1836 a theater group was formed and presented plays in a large frame building. The first jail was built in 1837.

In 1840, the first brick house was built in Palmyra by a Mr. Shannon. Many fine brick houses followed, some still being lived in. The large number of antebellum homes and buildings maintained in Palmyra are a source of community pride.

An ambitious but misguided plan for a &ldquoGolden City&rdquo on the Mississippi was developed by early Marion County settlers William Muldrow and Dr. Ely. Marion City was founded in 1835, financed by eastern money raised by speculators who inspired interest and confidence in the plans for a elaborate commercial center connected to the country by river traffic and the earliest railroad beds surveyed and laid in Missouri. Muldrow, along with some local developers, laid out an ambitious city and built several buildings as hundreds of investors poured in, mainly from Pennsylvania. But he had chosen his site unwisely, along the river bottoms east of Palmyra&mdasha problem he dismissed, pointing out that St. Petersburg and Chicago were built on swamps. Floods of 1836 washed the town away, but it was partially rebuilt. Subsequent flooding over the next 15 years all but wiped the settlement off the map for good. Charles Dickens was said to have drawn upon descriptions of Marion City as his &ldquoEden&rdquo in Martin Chuzzlewit. Using modern flood control methods and a series of embankments, American Cyanamid utilized the site in the 20th century to build a large plant employing hundreds of area workers. The company was sold to BASF in 2000.

An all boys school, St. Paul&rsquos College, opened in 1848 and was run by headmaster Dr. William B. Corbyn. The Missouri Legislature chartered the school as a college with the powers and privileges of a university in 1853. The building currently serves as a private residence.
St. Paul&rsquos College

William Russell, along with Majors and Waddell, founded the famous &ldquoPony Express.&rdquo Russell
returned to Palmyra after his business ventures, including the Pony Express, failed. He lived with his son John until his death. His home, built in 1858 and originally known asthe P.J. Sower house is a privateresidence today. Russell is buried in Greenwood Cemetery, where a marker erected in 1965 was placed.

William Russell&rsquos home, 1858


Old County Jail, 1858

In 1862, what some called the darkest crime of the Civil War, the &ldquoPalmyra Massacre,&rdquo was committed in Palmyra. Palmyra had been occupied by the Union Army, and local men who refused to join the Union army or who had actively engaged in seditious acts were jailed in the County Jail, which was used as a federal prison during the Civil War. During a raid led by Col Porter of the Missouri Militia (southern forces) to an attempt to free those prisoners, Porter&rsquos men kidnapped a Union sympathizer, 62-year-old Andrew Allsman. The Union forces demanded that Allsman be returned within ten days or ten prisoners would be shot. It was later believed that Allsman had been killed by some of Porter&rsquos men in any case, he was not returned, and Col. William McNeil of the Union Army made good his threat and had ten prisoners executed at the old county fair grounds. The grounds were never again used as fairgrounds. Frank Sosey, publisher of the Palmyra Spectator, wrote the book &ldquoRobert Devoy&rdquo based on the event. A monument was erected in the early years of the 20th century dedicated to the ten men who where shot. The jail where the men had been held was built in 1858 it served as the county jail until 1992. Landmarks of Northeast Missouri, a local preservation society, is restoring it as a Civil War museum.

Monument to the victims of the Palmyra Massacre

During the Civil War, a pure copper ball adorned the steeple of the second courthouse erected on the site of the first. When Confederate troops raided the courthouse, they took target practice on the old copper ball. The ball is now displayed in the rotunda of the current courthouse, built in 1900. When direct solicitation of funds failed to raise enough money to pay for the building, William Jennings Bryan was brought to Palmyra to deliver a fund-raising speech in June of 1901. &ldquoLady Justice,&rdquo which adorns the building, is one of the few statues of its type that depicts the lady without a blindfold.



The Old Calaboose, an attractive stone building, was built on the &ldquoSpring Branch&rdquo in 1875 as the city jail it never saw much use as the cityprisoners were heldin the county jail. Today it houses a restaurant.
After the Palmyra Massacre, the fairgrounds then used closed for some 20 years, then were relocated to the north part of the city. County fairs were very popular, featuring a race track, amphitheater, floral hall and the livestock barn. Floral Hall is all that remains of this popular entertainment center the building was moved to the current fairgrounds in the west part of town in the late 20th century

Transportation
Railroads: The Palmyra and Quincy Railroad was located just north of town on a road bed created by blasting through the solid rock of a bluff. The &ldquorock cut&rdquo became a legend. The Hannibal & St. Joe Railroad began in Hannibal, continued through many small towns and terminated in St. Joseph, Missouri. The first Pony Expressmail began its journey on this road the journey took four hours, fifteen minutes. A depot serving this line stood on South Main for about 100 years.

&ldquoBoots&rdquo Howard (Hiram Sylvester Howard), was the first aviator in Palmyra. He learned to fly by the seat of his pants, flying the mail through the mountains of West Virginia without instruments and often stopping off in Palmyra for a visit. Hot air balloon demonstrations captured the imagination of fairgoers during county fairs.

Newspapers


Jane Darwell&rsquos home

Early newspapers were essential to the growth of the new city. Early papers were the Missouri Whig, the Palmyra Courier, and the present Palmyra Spectator. Mergers and changes in management resulted in today&rsquos Hannibal Courier-Post and the Palmyra Spectator, which is Missouri&rsquos oldest weekly, serving continuously (under various names) since August 3, 1839, when Jacob Sosey, publisher, established &ldquoThe Missouri Whig and General Advertiser.&rdquo

Actress Jane Darwell (given name Patty Woodward) was born in and grew up in Palmyra. She won an academy award for her role as Ma Joad in &ldquoThe Grapes of Wrath.&rdquo Her father was superintendent of the Hannibal-St. Joe Railroad, and their family home is a private residence today.

The City Hall of Palmyra is located in a former bank building on Main Street.

Harold Harris introduced the use of the automobile to deliver mail to and from Palmyra. Prior to 1901, mail delivery in and out of Palmyra was handled by New London. Mr. Harris drove a Model-T, known as the Tin Lizzie. Local lore says that Elizabeth Luckenbaugh, a resident of the city, had a Ford Motor Company dealership in the early days, and &ldquoLizzie&rdquo sold so many Model-T&rsquos that Ford named the &ldquoTin Lizzie&rdquo after her.

Down on the Rhine. Saturday night was the night everybody did their shopping, visited&mdashand drank. The streets were packed with shoppers, and the taverns&mdashall located in the 100 block of South Main&mdashwere packed with men who said they were going &ldquodown on the Rhine&rdquo for a beer.

The Hanley Opera House was flourishing by 1857. Audiences could enjoy musicals and &ldquoentertainments&rdquo, often from distant cities, or hear flowery or impassioned speeches by William Jennings Bryan and Champ Clark. The building today houses a seed store.

The Bicentennial Oak
During the Bicentennial year, the State of Missouri selected in each county the oldest farm and the biggest tree and marked them. The state claims that the &ldquobig Oak&rdquo in the northwest part of town near the fairgrounds began growth in 1688.


Murphy Triangle

Arthur H. Murphy (1868-1922) was the first Democratic County Chairman in the Bronx, a position later held by Ed &ldquoIn Like Flynn&rdquo Flynn and Charles Buckley. His parents were among the thousands of Irish immigrants who crossed the Atlantic Ocean during the 19th century to escape the poverty and famine in Ireland. By the end of that century, 37 percent of the U.S. population was foreign born and the Irish comprised nearly a fourth of that number. They soon gained a foothold in the Tammany Hall wing of the Democratic Party and dominated New York politics well into the 20th century. It was as part of this organization that Arthur Murphy became a leading figure in the New York political landscape.

Born in Manhattan in 1868, Murphy moved to the Tremont section of the Bronx in 1893, where the Irish began living and working as farmhands in the early 19th century. Their numbers increased appreciably when work began on the Croton Aqueduct and the High Bridge. As a close-knit Irish community developed in the Fordham and Tremont areas, Catholic churches flourished, and local taverns became centers of social and political life much like the pubs back home in Ireland. Aside from his official duties, Arthur Murphy presided over a Democratic club that met in a tavern that he owned near the Bronx Borough Hall.

After losing an election for Bronx Borough President, he was elected to the Board of Aldermen (the predecessor of the City Council). He become the protégé of Charles Murphy (1858-1924) (no relation), the leader of the Tammany Hall political machine. Charles Murphy, called the most effective politician in the city&rsquos history, had launched the political careers of Al Smith and Senator Robert F. Wagner, among others. (The phrase &ldquoin like Flynn&rdquo stems from the sense of inevitability that Flynn, as Charles Murphy&rsquos choice, would succeed Arthur Murphy as the County Chairman). When the Bronx became a separate county in 1914, many at Tammany Hall were apprehensive about creating a new organization there, fearing it would be difficult to control. Charles Murphy assured his fellow Democrats that with Arthur Murphy at the helm, loyalty wouldn&rsquot pose a problem.

Arthur Murphy fulfilled his mentor&rsquos promise and retained his post as Bronx County Democratic Chairman until his death in 1922. His funeral is described in an obituary in the New York Times as &ldquoone of the largest ever held in the county&rdquo¦ [with] more than 15,000 people [lining] the streets from Arthur Avenue and Crotona Park North, where Mr. Murphy lived, to see the funeral procession of 600 automobiles pass on its way to St. Joseph&rsquos Church on Bathgate Avenue.&rdquo Supreme Court Justices and prominent politicians, including former Governor Al Smith, attended and all city and county departments in the Bronx closed on February 10 in tribute to a man who set the pattern for Bronx Irishmen in politics to follow.

The two parcels of land for Arthur Murphy Square were acquired by the city in 1899 and 1901 through condemnation. Parks acquired jurisdiction in 1913. In 1926, Mayor John F. Hylan (1869 - 1936), another Charles Murphy protégé, approved a resolution by the Board of Aldermen to designate the 0.1 acre bounded by East 181st Street, 3rd Avenue, and Quarry Road as Arthur Murphy Square Park. It is just a few blocks from the house on Crotona Park North where Arthur Murphy lived.


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Part 1: Historic Charles Town

The Railroad and Charlestown.

For nearly a century, the railroad was the lifeline of Charlestown to the outside world. The 1856 publication of the Philadelphia, Wilmington and Baltimore Railroad Guide reported that "in the early days of the railroad from Wilmington, Charlestown was determined upon as a terminus, and it was then the intention to convey passengers thence to Baltimore by steamboat." The guide further indicated that Charlestown was forty-three miles from Baltimore and fifty-five from Philadelphia. Throughout this time, ducking and fishing were the town's main industries. The fishing industry utilized the shipping channels and the hunters used the rails. The authors of the 1856 PW&B Guide, aware of the business it generated throughout the sporting industry, dedicated ten pages to describe to passengers the intricacies of duck hunting on the Susquehanna Flats. Market hunters could quickly send the day's kill to the markets in Baltimore and Philadelphia, where such ducks as Canvasbacks brought three dollars a pair at the turn of the century. Additionally, "sports" from Washington, Baltimore, and Philadelphia were less than an hour away via rail.

(The photograph above, circa 1927, is the old railroad station. It burned in about 1935, and was replaced with the station pictured right. It was demolished in 1952.)

The Charlestown School

Just like any other town, Charlestown had its one-room public school. The first schoolhouse was erected shortly before 1850. It was made of brick and was located south of the fairgrounds.

On March 12, 1881, The Cecil Whig reported on the testing that had recently occurred at the town's school:

The Charlestown Public School. The time has not yet arrived in the annals of all school districts where the interest of the school is of a primary importance. This was the more forcibly brought to view by the utter failure on the part of the parents of the Charlestown school to put in an appearance during the week of examination, beginning February 28th and ending March 5th,-"Honor to whom honor is due." The following parents were present: Mrs. W. Atkinson, Mrs. A. Calvert, Mrs. James McKeown, Mrs. Alex. Craig. Mr. J. N. Black, Mr. Charles H. Graham, the last named gentleman being one of our trustees. The remaining thirty-five were at home waiting until something of a Herculean nature compels them to look upon a place set apart for education as a stepping stone to the future greatness of the generation that will rule in the place of those who in a few years will be numbered with the pale nations of the earth. Honorary visitors Miss H. Chapman, Miss Susie Graham, Miss Cora Graham, Miss Mary Cooling, Miss Fannie Craig, Mr. Arthur Logan and Mr. Linwood Simpson. Above Sixth Grade-Susie Cooper, Jennie Johnson, Tilla Tucker. Not examined. Geography-F. Class.-Susie Cooper 100, Theresa Smith 83, Benj. Cooling 94, Tilla Tucker 93, Carrie Graham 67, Annie Cooling 84, Emma Black 70, George Burroughs 88, Seward Cooper 97, John Frederick 64, Jennie Johnson 92, Victoria Algard 99, Elmer Craig 98. Geography-E. Class.-Wm. S. Burroughs 100, Howard Watson 86, Hiram Cooper 89, Penn Cooper 72, Geo. Murphy 78, John McKeown 89, John Norman 89, Annie Graham 89, Ellie Rutter 89, Lizzie Atkinson 94, Lizzie Steele 83, Mattie Craig 99, Mamie Whitelock 85, Beckie Graham 97, Clara Watson 91. Geography-D. Class.-Clara M. Alexander 100, Jennie Bennett 100, J. Algard 65, Mary Rutter 94, Hattie Logan 65, Cecil Cooper 94, Wallace Harris 77, E. Calvert 65. Geography-Oral Class.-C. Richardson 87, Mary McKeown 83, B. Burroughs 86, John T. Cooper 78, W. L. Atkinson 87, Joseph Weber 87, Harry Murphy 67. Grammar-F. Class.-Susie Cooper 100, Jennie Johnson 98, Tilla Tucker 98. E Class.-Theresa Smith 91, Elmer Craig 91, Ben Cooling 95, Carrie Graham 100, Annie Cooling 100, Emma Black 100, G. Burroughs 91, Seward Cooper 100, V. Algard 82, Wm. S. Burroughs 83, Jessie Murphy 64, Ellie Rutter 78. Lizzie Atkinson 91, Annie Graham 82. History-F. Class.-Susie Cooper 90, Tilla Tucker 93, John Frederick 76, Jennie Johnson 83, Ben Cooling 94, Elmer Craig 100, Seward Cooper 82. Second part F. Class: Theresa Smith 91, Carrie Graham 100, Annie Cooling 100, Emma Black 91, G. Burroughs 100, V. Algard 91. History-E. Class.-Wm. S. Burroughs 100, Howard Watson 71, H. Cooper 100, Penn Cooper 71, Jessie Murphy 73, Geo. Murphy 71, John McKeown 100, John Norman 100, Annie Graham 100, Ella Rutter 64, Lizzie Atkinson 100, Lizzie Steel 100, J. M. Black 73, Mattie Craig 91, M. Whitelock 86, Clara Watson 71. Spelling Class F.-Susie Cooper 100, Theresa Smith 65, Ben Cooling 98, Victoria Algard 97, Elmer Craig 97, Tilla Tucker 93, Carrie Graham 92, Annie Cooling 92, Emma Black 95, George Burroughs 90, Seward Cooper 91, Jno. Frederick 93, Jennie Johnson 100. Spelling Class E.-*Hiram Cooper 94, *Jessie Murphy 77, *Annie Graham 85, *Ella Rutter 62, *Lizzie Atkinson 82, *Lizzie Steel 77, *Mattie Craig 70, *Beckie Graham 80. This class contains eighteen members, ten being failures. Spelling Class D.-*Clara M. Alexander 89, *Jennie Bennett 99, *John Algard 98, *Mary Rutter 98, Hattie Logan 81, *Wallace Harris 84, *John Weber 90, *Evlyn Calvert 91, *Pinkney Black 81, *Elwood Steel 84. Those marked with a star (*) were promoted. Arithmetic classes F. E. D. acquitted themselves creditably. Quite a number of the scholars were detained at home by the very sore arms, which would add a little more credit to your attendance and average. The examinations of classes C. B. A. was too tedious to give an account of at present. Martha Biddle, Sena White.

(Above, the Charlestown Public School, circa 1888).

By about 188, a new schoolhouse had been built in town under the authority of the Cecil County School Board. The new school taught students above sixth grade to about the ninth grade. Thereafter, those who wished to continue their education most likely went to either the Tome School in Port Deposit or West Nottingham Academy in Colora, Maryland. On March 23, 1888, the Charlestown Public School hosted an evening of entertainment with a program put on by the students.

(Above, Charlestown Public School, circa 1905. Below, the class of 1910.)

Front row (left to right): Otis Murphy, Earnest Heverin, James Lewis, Henry Murphy, Malin Ward, Richard Haines, Charles Calvert, Theodore Murphy, Joe DeMonde, Emory Norman, the two Veasey boys, Guy and War. Middle row (left to right): Harry Heverin, Beulah Cooper, Anna Cooper, Lilly Norman, Arlene Haines, Della Steele, Elizabeth Howell, Rachel Barnes, Rachel Cooper, Thomas Lewis, and Fanny Patchell. Third row (left to right): Gladys Cooper, Helen Patchell, Leroy Steele, Reba Graham, Getta DeMonde, Mary Murphy, Elsea Norman, Bayard Jackson, Everett Ward, Howard Cooper, Robert Calvert, and Miss Dorothy Diggs, teacher. Miss Francis Cleaves is standing behind Gladys Cooper.

The Class of 1928: From top (left to right): Nellie Cass, Marion Graham, Ella Clayton, Virginia Graham, Dorothy, Delbert Clayton, Bulla Murphy, Charles Musselman, Virginia Gibson, Crayton Heisler, Leon Beal, Allen W. Purner, Cran Henry, Rock Clayton, Heis McCall, Junior Lynch, Skees Gillespi, Mildred Reinhardt, Howard Ward, Tunney Patchell, Doris Clayton, Rebecca Cooper, Ella Gibson, Mary Calvert, June Guiberson, Sonny James, Ruth Purner, Dorothy Kelly, Charlotte Murphy, Ellen Purner, Nancy Black, Buddy Murphy, Bertha Beal, Florence Graham, Dolly Algard, Charlotte Ann Cooper, Robby McKinney, Miss McKinney, Mildred Murphy, Eugene Owens, Gus Clayton, Miss Clayton, Edgar McMullen, Ed Clayton, Edmond Cass, Leslie Cooper, and Bill Musselman.

Heisler House viewed from Water Street, circa 1908. Pictured: 1. Catherine Mehl Heisler 2. Helen Heisler (Hoy) 3. Harriet Heisler (McCall) 4. Jeanette Heisler (McCall) and Etta Heisler (Turk). Below, Joseph Heisler of Charlestown poling Otto Eisenlohr of Philadelphia in 1909. Joseph Heisler was a commercial fisherman and market gunner, who died in 1911. Mr. Heisler did not usually hire out to "sports" as he considered the amateur hunters a nuisance. Mr. Eisenlohr was an exception. The boat "Summer Duck," built in about 1900, is attributed to John B. Graham, but it was more likely built by his son, John C. Graham, who was a professional boatbuilder in Charlestown in 1900.

In about 1920, Horace D. Graham and Wilmer Murphy stared a boatyard on the riverfront a short distance from Charlestown Manor Beach. They sold the property in 1924 to Columbus William Thorn Jr. of Ridley Park, Pennsylvania, who constructed a boatyard and yacht basin, pictured above in 1935.

(C. W. Thorn, Jr. on board his yacht "The Lazy Jack", circa 1924.)

(The Miss Charlestown" owned and captained by the Graham family, circa 1922.)

(The "Louise" owned by Harry H. Barnes, circa 1919.)

(This photograph taken about 1915 shows the numerous small vessels used on the North East River, including bushwack boat, rail skiff, canoe and rowboat. Notice the cow standing in front of the boathouse.

Each year, from the early 1900s through the 1930s. the James Adams Showboat would cruise the East Coast, making a stop in Charlestown to put on a show for the town to enjoy. This boat was the basis for Edna Ferber's musical Showboat. It burned in 1941.

Many of the town's prominent families owned boats and relaxed by the water in the hot summers. Here, Harry H. Barnes' boat, the "Blue Wing," pictured August 18, 1938, at Charlestown.

George Cooper also enjoyed yachting on the river. His boat, the "Uno," was a converted bugeye, from sail to power. This photograph was taken in about 1928 in Charlestown.

Boating in Charlestown was not just for enjoyment it was also a business. At right, Carrie Blackwell, captain of the "Carrie L. Shane" of North East, Maryland, ran weekly trips to Baltimore to purchase groceries for Andrew "Buddy" Reynolds of the North East Wharf and Grocery Store in 1920 to 1924. She would stop in Charlestown to sell the groceries. The ship was built in 1884 by W. Skinner & Sons. It was 44 feet long, 10 feet 6 inches wide, and drew 3 feet of water.

During the fall of each year, this ship, the "Vitator," owned by a Mr. Alexander from Maine, would appear at Charlestown and its owner would go gunning with Russell Clayton and Harry H. Barnes.

(Snap Holloway's yacht, the "Mable.")

Holloway Beach, Charlestown, Maryland. A popular spot on Maryland's eastern shore, Holloway Beach attracted thousands of bathers each summer to relax, play, and swim in the waters of the North East River, just south of town. As with the ocean's beaches now, families would day-trip to Charlestown's beaches to enjoy the sun and surf, whether by beach or by water.

Everything needed, including refreshments were served at the beach stand by Geneva Barnes (above) and in the evening, the teens would dance the night away in the beach pavilion.

Another popular spot, just upriver from Holloway Beach towards town, was Murphy's Beach. Owned by the Murphy family of Charlestown, Murphy's Beach was a popular boating destination also. For a time, Charlestown's beaches rivaled those at Betterton.

(At left, Ruth Patchell, Lucille Bailey, Lizzeta Logan and Doris Logan, shown canoeing at Murphy's Beach in the Summer of 1929. Photograph courtesy of Ruth Patchell Wright, Charlestown.)

Ralph Murphy (1898-1969), by Jack Manning.

(At left, Earl Murphy holding Pink Murphy Jesse Murphy, Ralph Murphy and Otas Murphy, at the Family house, circa 1918, courtesy of Ruth Patchell Wright, Charlestown.)

Ralph Murphy was born in Charlestown in 1898. He lived his entire life in the area known as Murphy's Beach at the end of what is now Tasker's Lane. It is believed that Ralph's father worked the water before him, and Ralph worked with his father and eventually carried on the family business. Murphy's Beach was established sometime before 1923 and was a popular bathing spot up into the 1950s. Ralph's brother, Earl, ran a summer stand and bathhouse, and rented rowboats and canoes. Although Ralph lived in the family home at the beach, he spent most of his time making a living hunting and fishing.

In the early days, Ralph gunned the Susquehanna Flats and the "knoll" off Carpenter's Point in a sinkbox. It is said that he carried two automatic shotguns and would shoot one as the ducks came in, then kick around and shoot the other as they were going out. He was a good shot, but went through a lot of shells. During this time, Earl probably gunned most of the time with Ralph. Market gunning was also being practiced during this time, and Ralph was the owner of a "big gun." His gun was reported as being one of five guns brought from England in the 1850s to be used on the Susquehanna Flats. Another of these big guns belonged to George Washington Barnes and his brother, Perry K. Barnes Dick Barnes sold the Barnes rig to Richard "Kip" duPont in the 1960s. Before Ralph's death, duPont had him pose for a series of pictures shooting the Barnes big gun.

Ralph Murphy's big gun measured 9 feet 4 inches long, had a bore, and weighed approximately 80 to 90 pounds. The most ducks Ralph recalled shooting with one shot was 81 Canvasbacks. They were sitting in a hole in the ice, so he pulled the boat across the ice to make the shot.

In 1918, a federal law was passed to limit the bore size used to hunt migratory waterfowl, and effectively ended the legality of hunting with the "big guns." Ralph gave the big gun to neighbor George Cooper in the 1920s. Ralph had gunned with George Cooper and Charlestown decoy maker Will Heverin during Prohibition. George Cooper died in the late 1940s while burning brush at his home, and George's widow let Ralph and Heis McCall look for the big gun, but they were unable to find it. A few years later, Mrs. Cooper had a house sale, and Weller Wilson found the gun hidden under a door in the attic and purchased it for $35. The Murphy gun was sold at auction in September 1970 to Norris Pratt of Kimbelsville, Pennsylvania, for $2,500.

After federal law outlawed the use of sinkboxes in 1935, Ralph Murphy guided "sports" from New York and Connecticut with his "bushwhack" rig. His sculler, Edgar McMullen, said that Ralph's sculling oars were short from the leather to the rowing end, and were quite hard to scull. Ralph did most of his bushwhack hunting in the North East River, near Red Point or Carpenter's Point, rather than hunt the Flats. He would pick up "sports" at North East or Perryville in his big cabin boat and go directly to the gunning grounds. Ralph Murphy's bushwhack boat is currently on display in the collection of the Upper Bay Museum in North East, Maryland.

Ralph Murphy also commercially fished during the months he was not fishing. He had rigs for both gill netting and hauling seining, and for a time fished traps nets with Dick Barnes in the 1940s. Striped bass was the normal quarry for Murphy, and he sold many locally and to be shipped throughout the northern states. For several years, he provided the Jewish community in Philadelphia with live carp he haulseined from the Susquehanna Flats. During the 1960s, Ralph Murphy received a Maryland state contract to catch 10,000 striped bass for a state study. During the first year, the state could not remove the fish quickly enough after four years (and the disappearance of most of the river grass) it took weeks of hard fishing to catch 3,000 bass. Ralph enjoyed the years before his death in 1969 hunting with Kip duPont and Steele Howard. He was a true Upper Bay waterman who lived during the high points as well as the decline of the golden era of hunting and fishing on the Upper Bay. Although the period has been highly romanticized, it took much hard work and talent to survive on the Bay, talents Ralph always displayed.

Ralph Murphy also made decoys for his personal gunning rig. It is not known how many decoys he made, but the number is most likely less than 300. He made mostly Canvasbacks and some Blackheads. He also made miniature Canvasbacks as gifts for friends. In later years, Mr. Murphy made decorative birds that he sold to collectors.

(Blackhead Drake in original paint by Ralph Murphy, Charlestown, Maryland, circa 1935.)
(Canvasback Drake and Hen in original paint by Ralph Murphy, Charlestown, Maryland, circa 1925, from the collection of Vernon Bryant, Greenbank Farm, Charlestown, Maryland.)

(Canvasback Hen and Drake in original paint, Ralph Murphy, Charlestown, Maryland, circa 1940.)

(Canvasback Drake and Hen in original paint by Ralph Murphy, Charlestown, Maryland, circa 1925, from the collection of Vernon Bryant, Greenbank Farm, Charlestown, Maryland.)

(Canvasback Hen and Drake in original paint, Ralph Murphy, Charlestown, Maryland, circa 1940.)

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The geneolgy of the Murphy family dictated by J. M. (James Martin) Murphy, a grandson of the pioneer to his granddaughter, Mattie Kanatzar at Clearwater, Kansas in 1913.

John Murphy, the head of the Murphy family in Kentucy was born in North Carolina about 1755 of Irish parentage. On account of the cruelties of a step father, he left his native mountains and vallies and never returned to them He was then about sixteen years old. He joined a company of adventures and set out for the then wilderness of Kentucky. After several weeks of great hardships and dangers from the then savage Indians, they finally arrived in what is now known as the bluegrass region of Kentucky. They were compelled to earn their living by hunting and trapping and all the time at the risk of their lives. He cast his fortune with Daniel Boone, Harod, Simon Kenton and others who entered the country seeking new homes. By this time there was enough in the group that they began to build forts and from settlements. But the Indians were still determined to destroy the "Pale Faces", as they called the white settlers and so they spared neither age or sex. Scenes of blood shed were almost a daily occurrence, and for the next twenty years, it was almost one continual scene of warfare of some kind. John Murphy participated in all of them as these were the ones that finally wrested Kentucky from the hands of the Indians. Some of the battles in which he participated at this time was --Bluelick on August 19, 1782, Chillicothe in 1779, Harmers defeat in September 1790, Arthur St Clair's defeat in November 1790. The Fallen Timbers on August 20, 1794. The troubles with the Indians being at an end in 1795, he then purchased a tract of land on Sugar Creek in Garrard County, one mile above its mouth. About this time he married Mary Yarber, who was born in Halifax County, Virginia, of Welch parents. He remained there for eight or ten years and then purchased a tract of land, one mile east of the mouth of Sugar Creek, which in 1913 and some years later was still occupied by some of his descendents and known as the old Murphy Farm. He spent the rest of his days, dying in 1826. He was laid to rest in what is known as the Old Murphy Cemetery on their farm. His wife died in 1866. Here he raised eleven children that lived to maturity and one, Calvin, died when a baby. The names of the twelve children are: Peggy, James, Elizabeth, Sarah, William, John, Brazilla, Harden, Lucy, Jane, Joseph and Calvin.

A. Descendants of Phillip MURPHY and Mary MURPHY (nee LAMPORT) from the townland of East Bog near Mayglass, County Wexford, Ireland


Children of Phillip MURPHY and Mary MURPHY (nee LAMPORT)

The family tree starts with Phillip MURPHY who lived in County Wexford, Ireland. Phillip MURPHY was my great-great-great grandfather.

I have a ‘Birth and Baptismal Certificate’ for Dennis MURPHY showing his father, Phillip MURPHY, and his mother Mary MURPHY (nee LAMPORT ). The certificate is an extract from the Register of Baptisms of the combined parish Church of Mayglass and Ballymore, County Wexford. The certificate was provided to me on 29 Sep 1987 by Rev Nicholas Doyle PP from Ballymore. It reads:

‘Diocese of Ferns Parish of Ballymore/Mayglass

On examination of the Register of Baptisms of above Parish I certify that according to it Dennis MURPHY, Bog, Mayglass, was born on … day of …, and was baptised according to the Rites of the Catholic Church on 3rd day of December 1812 in the Church of St Mary’s Ballymore by the Rev., ….

Parents Phillip MURPHY
Mary LAMPORT

Sponsors Patrick BROWN
Catherin FURLONG’

This is the only record I have of Phillip MURPHY. When I spoke by telephone to Father Doyle, he told me that the above baptism appears in the first few pages of the Baptism Register, that it is now in a dilapidated condition and that it is unlikely to have any earlier entries for the Phillip MURPHY family.

The only sibling of Dennis MURPHY that I know of is his brother, James MURPHY, born 23 Mar 1823.


Children of Dennis MURPHY and Jane Elizabeth MURPHY (nee WHEELOCK)

Dennis MURPHY and Jane Elizabeth WHEELOCK were my great-great grandparents.

I have a Certificate of Marriage for Dennis MURPHY and Jane WHEELOCK. The certificate is an extract from the Marriage Register of the Church of Mayglass, County Wexford, provided on 29 Sep 1987 by Rev Nicholas Doyle PP. It reads:

‘Parish of Ballymore/Mayglass Diocese of Ferns

EXTRACT FROM THE MARRIAGE REGISTER

Dennis MURPHY and Jane WHEELICK [This should, in fact read, WHEELOCK ] were married in the Church of Mayglass (Chapel Ballymore) according to the Rite of the Catholic Church, on the 26th day of July 1839.

The witnesses were Dennis MEANY and Margaret DUGAN.’

I also have a ‘Birth and Baptismal Certificate’ for their son, William James MURPHY, being an extract from the Register of Baptisms of the combined parish Church of Mayglass and Ballymore, County Wexford. It was provided on 29 Sep 1987 by Rev Nicholas Doyle PP at Ballymore. It reads:

‘Diocese of Ferns Parish of Ballymore/Mayglass

On examination of the Register of Baptisms of above Parish I certify that according to it William James MURPHY, East Bog , Mayglass, was born on … day of …, and was baptised according to the Rites of the Catholic Church on 14th day of November 1841 in the Church of Ballymore by the Rev., ….

Parents Dennis MURPHY
Jane WHEELICK

Sponsors James STAFFORD
Mary DILLON’

I have similar baptism certificates for Mary MURPHY (4 Jun 1843) and Philip Charles MURPHY (11 Apr 1845), a sister and brother of William James MURPHY respectively.

Dennis MURPHY and Jane MURPHY (nee WHEELOCK) and their children emigrated to Australia from, Ireland. The 'Shalimar', 1467 tons register, the ninth ship of the White Star line, left the Port of Liverpool on 22 November 1854 and was on its first voyage. It was under the command of captain Amos Robertson. The 'Shalimar' was a clipper ship. It accomplished the run 'in something under 76 days' (The 'Argus', Melbourne, Victoria, Friday 9 Feb 1855, page 4), arriving in Melbourne on 9 February 1855. Included in the shipping passenger list were Dennis MURPHY (35), Jane MURPHY (30), William MURPHY (13), Mary MURPHY (10), Philip MURPHY (7), James MURPHY (4), Jane MURPHY (infant) and Christopher JEFFARES (26).

Dennis and Jane MURPHY had one more child after their arrival in Victoria, Catherine MURPHY, but she died at 14 months on 6 Aug 1858 . Dennis and Jane MURPHY were living off Queensberry Street, North Melbourne at the time. Dennis’ occupation was a carter. Jane MURPHY (nee WHEELOCK) died at Lothian Street, Hotham at 58 years of age on 30 May 1878, some 23 years after her arrival in Victoria. The cause of her death was organic disease of liver and stomach ulceration. She is buried at the Melbourne General Cemetery . Dennis MURPHY died at Woodstock, Shire of Epping, Victoria, on 18 Nov 1895 at 82 years of age. Dennis had been a cab proprietor and he had lived for 40 years in Victoria after his arrival from Ireland. His cause of death was heart disease and senile decay. The names of his parents were not known.

Dennis MURPHY, like his wife Jane MURPHY (nee WHEELOCK), is buried at the Melbourne General Cemetery in the Roman Catholic area . The following inscription appears on their tombstone:

‘Erected by
Mary O’Sullivan
In loving memory of her father
DENIS MURPHY
Native of Mayglass Co. Wexford Ireland
Who died 18.11.1895 Aged 80 years
Also her mother
JANE E. MURPHY
Who died 29 May 1878 Aged 58 years
Also her brother
JAMES
The beloved husband of
ANNIE MURPHY
Who died 3.4.1882 Aged 30 years
Also her sister
JANE E. MURPHY
Who died 19.2.1887 Aged 30 years
Requiescant in Pace’


As to the other children of Dennis MURPHY and Jane MURPHY (nee WHEELOCK), the first son was William James MURPHY who was born about Nov 1841 (see his baptism certificate above). William MURPHY married Sarah HARRISON on 25 Apr 1865 at St Francis Church Melbourne. Sarah HARRISON was 19 years old. She was born c 1846 in Dalry, County Ayrshire Scotland to William HARRISON and Sarah HARRISON (nee DAVIDSON) . At 12 years of age, Sarah emigrated to Victoria from Scotland aboard the ‘Herald’ with her parents, brothers and sisters (Elizabeth (17), Letitia (15), John (8) and Thomas (5)) arriving in Geelong Victoria in June 1859 . Both William and Sarah resided at Hotham, North Melbourne. William’s occupation at the time was a cab man. Dennis’ occupation at that time was a farmer. The witnesses were Patrick MOYLAN and Catherine DUNN .

William James MURPHY and Sarah MURPHY (nee HARRISON) had 9 children between 1865 and 1883 – see below for details.

Sarah MURPHY (nee HARRISON) died at 38 years on 18 May 1884 at Woods Point, Victoria. The cause of death was ‘cancer of the breast mortification’, the duration of which was 1 year. The informant of Sarah’s death was her brother John HARRISON who, like his father (William HARRISON), was a miner at Woods Point . Sarah had spent 25 years in Victoria after her arrival from Scotland and is buried at Woods Point Cemetery.

After Sarah’s death in 1884, her husband, William James MURPHY, remarried. He married Annie DOYLE (nee RUSH) at the Catholic Church, Mansfield, Victoria on 31 Jan 1900. Annie DOYLE was the mother-in-law of William James MURPHY’s son, George Davidson MURPHY. Her first husband, Michael DOYLE, died circa 1896. William James MURPHY was 51 years old and Annie MURPHY (nee DOYLE/RUSH) was 41 years of age. William James MURPHY and Annie MURPHY (nee DOYLE/RUSH) resided at Woods Point at the time of their marriage. The witnesses were Henry Sylvester COULAN and E SMITH .

William James MURPHY died at 67 years of age at Woodstock, Shire of Epping, Victoria, on 17 July 1909. The cause of his death was chronic bronchitis, the duration of which was 2 years. His occupation was shown on his death certificate as a labourer. William had lived in Victoria for 55 years after emigrating from Ireland, with his parents in 1855. He is buried in the Epping Public Cemetery , Victoria. The Register of Burials for the Epping Cemetery, entry no 149 for 1909, shows the burial of William MURPHY on 20 Jul 1909, aged 67, late residence Woods Point, occupation miner, cause of death chronic bronchitis, denomination RC, with a note that he is ‘buried in grave with C. [Christopher] Jeffers (near O’Sullivan)’. Annie MURPHY (nee RUSH) died aged 70 in 1929 at Hawthorn Victoria .

The next daughter of Dennis MURPHY and Jane MURPHY (nee WHEELOCK) was Mary MURPHY who was baptised in the Church of Mayglass, County Wexford, on 4 Jun 1843. Her parents were living at East Bog. Mary MURPHY married Daniel O’Sullivan, a farmer in the Woodstock area, on 8 Jun 1865 at St Francis Church Melbourne. Daniel O'SULLIVAN was born circa 1830 in Dawes?, County Kerry, Ireland. Daniel was a widower, his first wife, Margaret (nee PURCELL) having died on 9 Jul 1864. Daniel and Margaret O’SULLIVAN had a son, Eugene, who died on 16 Jan 1864 aged 7 months.

After Daniel O'SULLIVAN married Mary MURPHY, they had no children. When Mary O'SULLIVAN’s sister in law, Sarah MURPHY (nee HARRISON), died on 18 May 1884, Mary took 4 of the 9 children of William James MURPHY and Sarah MURPHY (nee HARRISON) - namely, Letitia ‘Isabella’ MURPHY, Sarah Elizabeth MURPHY, James Paden MURPHY and Denis Patrick/Andrew MURPHY - to Woodstock to help her brother raise them.

It seems that Mary O'SULLIVAN (nee MURPHY) was somewhat of a matriarch in the family. Not only did she help her brother raise some of his children but also she erected tombstones on her parents' grave (see inscription above) and on her husband's grave.

Daniel O’SULLIVAN died on 6 Jul 1900. The inscription on his tombstone in the Epping Public Cemetery reads:

'Erected by
MARY O'SULLIVAN
in loving memory of her husband
DANIEL O'SULLIVAN
Native of Dawes? County Kerry Ireland
who died 6 July 1900 aged 80 years
Also of his wife
MARGARET
who died 9 July 1864 aged 24 years
and of their son
EUGENE
who died 16 January 1864 aged 7 months
Also of his beloved mother
JOHANNAH
who died 24 September 1883 aged 99 years'.

Mary O’SULLIVAN (nee MURPHY) died on 7 Aug 1936 at Woodstock at 91 years of age. The cause of her death was senile decay and heart failure . She is buried in the Epping Public Cemetery with her nephew, James Paden MURPHY, who died unmarried, aged 84 years, on 7 Jun 1963.

The next son of Dennis MURPHY and Jane MURPHY (nee WHEELOCK) was Philip Charles MURPHY who was baptised at the Church of Mayglass, Wexford, on 11 Apr 1845. Philip Charles was 9 years of age when he emigrated with his parents and arrived in Melbourne on 9 Feb 1855. He is the mystery person in the family, in that I am having all sorts of trouble finding what happened to him. I have no record of his marriage or death! I would love some help in researching Philip Charles MURPHY.

The next son of Dennis MURPHY and Jane MURPHY (nee WHEELOCK) was James MURPHY who was born in County Wexford Ireland circa 1852. James was about 4 years of age when he emigrated with his parents and arrived in Melbourne on 9 Feb 1855. James married Annie HAGAN at St Mary’s, West Melbourne, on 13 Dec 1881. He was 29 years old and a cab driver residing in Hotham. Annie HAGAN was 26 years old and a machinist who also resided in Hotham. She was born in Donegal, Ireland, to John HAGAN and Maria HAGAN (nee MCFARLANE). The witnesses to the marriage were Christopher JEFFERS and Rebecca HAGAN . James died shortly after his marriage. He was 30 years old when, on 3 Apr 1882, he died at Lothian Street Hotham. The cause of his death was contrived (?) fever and abscess of liver. The only child of James MURPHY and Annie MURPHY (nee HAGAN) was Mary Louie MURPHY who was only about 3 months old when her father died . Mary Louie MURPHY was born at Curzon Street, Hotham, on 28 Dec 1881 . Annie MURPHY (nee HAGAN) died aged 55 in 1909 at Hotham West, Victoria. Mary Louie MURPHY married Albert Waters LEEMING in 1909 in North Melbourne. They had three children, Albert Roy (born 1910), Lorraine Patricia (born 1913) and Derham Brian (born 1917). Mary Louie LEEMING (nee MURPHY) died aged 69 in 1951 at East Brighton, Victoria.

The next daughter of Dennis MURPHY and Jane MURPHY (nee WHEELOCK) was Jane Elizabeth MURPHY who was born in County Wexford, Ireland circa 1854. Jane MURPHY was an infant when she emigrated with her parents and arrived in Melbourne on 9 Feb 1855. She never married. Jane died at 33 years at Lothian Street, Hotham on 20 Feb 1887. The cause of her death was venal disease and hepatic disease. She is buried in the Melbourne General Cemetery .

The final child of Dennis MURPHY and Jane MURPHY (nee WHEELOCK) was Catherine MURPHY. As mentioned above, she was born in Victoria but she died at 14 months on 6 Aug 1858. Her death certificate does not record where she is buried .


Children of William James MURPHY and Sarah MURPHY (nee HARRISON)

William MURPHY and Sarah MURPHY (nee HARRISON) were my great-grandparents.

The children of William MURPHY and Sarah MURPHY (nee HARRISON) start with Sarah Jane MURPHY who was born on 13 Nov 1865 at 28 Lothian Street, North Melbourne. Her mother, Sarah MURPHY’s (nee HARRISON) birthplace was shown on the birth certificate as Delroy (which apparently should be ‘Dalry’) Scotland. William was a cab man . Sarah Jane MURPHY died aged 1 year on 25 Jan 1867 of rentition? diarrhoea at Curzon Street, Hotham, and is buried at the Melbourne General Cemetery. William was still a cab owner .

William James MURPHY, the first son of William MURPHY and Sarah MURPHY (nee HARRISON), was born 11 Aug 1867 at Abbotsford Street, Hotham, Victoria. His mother, Sarah MURPHY’s (nee HARRISON) birthplace was shown as Ardrossan, Scotland. William, his father, was a cab driver . William MURPHY married Julia Ann LEADER in 1891 at Jamieson, Victoria . William MURPHY died on 12 Jun 1945 at Bairnsdale, Victoria, aged 78 years from chronic myocardial degeneration. His death certificate states that he had no children. He is buried in the Bairnsdale Cemetery . Julia MURPHY (nee LEADER) was born in 1866 . She died in 1944 at 79 years of age at South Melbourne .

John Harrison MURPHY, the second son of William MURPHY and Sarah MURPHY (nee HARRISON), was born on 26 May 1869 at Curzon Street, Hotham. The occupation of his father, William MURPHY, was then a miner. His mother, Sarah MURPHY (nee HARRISON) was living at Hotham . John Harrison MURPHY married Sarah COOK, daughter of Thomas COOK and Eliza COOK (nee LAMB), at Walhalla, Victoria, on 25 Dec 1894. The witnesses were Margaret E VAUX and Thomas HAIG . Sarah COOK was born at Wandiligong, Victoria, on 17 Jun 1875 . John Harrison MURPHY was a miner at Walhalla. William MURPHY and Thomas COOK were also miners at the time. John Harrison MURPHY and Sarah MURPHY (nee COOK) had 5 children, namely, John George Harrison MURPHY (born 1895, married Ada Veronica McCARTHY and died 1961), Thomas MURPHY (born 1897 and died 1957), William James MURPHY (born 1899, married Caroline Alice TUPPER and died 22 Feb 1962), Sarah MURPHY (born 3 Nov 1901 at Walhalla) and Lester Allen MURPHY (born 14 Feb 1908). John Harrison MURPHY was still a miner at Walhalla as at 3 Nov 1901 but his occupation on 14 Feb 1908 was a labourer in Traralgon, Gippsland, Victoria. John Harrison MURPHY died on 17 Jan 1912 at Traralgon aged 42 years. The cause of his death was chronic pulmonary tuberculosis and exhaustion. He is buried in the Traralgon Cemetery . Sarah MURPHY (nee COOK) died on 12 Jul 1950 at 10 Adler Grove, Merlynston, Victoria, aged 74 years. The cause of her death was myocardial degeneration and arteriosclerosis. She is buried at Fawkner Cemetery .

Mary Jane MURPHY, the second daughter of William MURPHY and Sarah MURPHY (nee HARRISON), was born on 26 Jul 1871 at Woods Point, Victoria. Mary Jane was known at times as ‘Fanny’. Her father, William MURPHY, was a miner at Woods Point. Her mother, Sarah MURPHY (nee HARRISON) was by then also living at Woods Point. Sarah’s mother, Mrs HARRISON, attended the birth . Mary Jane MURPHY married Michael Patrick CASEY (son of William CASEY and Isabella CASEY (nee DEVITT) who arrived in Melbourne aboard the ‘Eastern Empire’ on 11 Jun 1863) on 15 Sep 1896 at St Mary’s Catholic Church, Colac, Victoria. Mary Jane was 22 years old and Michael CASEY was a 25 year old farmer who was born at Ondit, Victoria, on 19 Mar 1871. The witnesses were Robert John CASEY, Mary TROY and Mary MORRISSY. Michael’s father, William CASEY, was a farmer and Mary Jane’s father, William MURPHY, was a miner at the time . Mary CASEY (nee MURPHY) and Michael CASEY had 5 children, namely, William James CASEY (born 1898 at Warrion, Victoria, and died 1974), Mary Theresa CASEY (born 1899 at Warrion and died 1987), Eileen Isabella CASEY (born 1901 at Beeac), Elizabeth May CASEY (born 1905 and died 1993) and Francis Joseph ‘Frank’ CASEY (born 1908 and died 1991). Michael CASEY died at 80 years of age on 26 Nov 1951 at Cobden, Victoria, and is buried in the Cobden Cemetery. His occupation on his death certificate is a retired carrier. The cause of Michael’s death was carcinoma of the stomach . Mary CASEY (nee MURPHY) died, aged 86 years, on 21 Aug 1957 at Cobden and is buried at Camperdown, Victoria. The cause of her death was cardiac (myocardial) failure and arterio sclerosis with hypertension .

Letitia ‘Isabella’ MURPHY, the third daughter of William James and Sarah MURPHY (nee HARRISON), was born on 9 Nov 1873 at Woods Point, Victoria. Her parents were living at Woods Point where her father was a miner. Sarah MURPHY’s (nee HARRISON) mother, Mrs HARRISON, attended the birth . Isabella MURPHY married Thomas O’Connor (son of Thomas O’Connor, miner, and Margaret O’Connor (nee KERLEY) born in Bendigo, Victoria, circa 1869) on 5 Oct 1896 at St Mary’s Roman Catholic Church, West Melbourne. The residence of Thomas O’CONNOR was Western Australia and Isabella O’Connor (nee MURPHY) lived at Walhalla, Gippsland, Victoria . Isabella O’CONNOR (nee MURPHY) and Thomas O’CONNOR had 5 children, namely, Letitia (deceased), Michael (deceased), Mary Isabella (born circa 1903, married Vivian Reynolds WORRALL 1941 and died 26 Aug 1982 without any children ), Kathleen Margaret (born circa 1909 and married a FLYNN) and Eileen Elizabeth (born circa 1912). Thomas O’CONNOR, who had been an engine driver, died 26 Feb 1932 at 18 Barrow Street, Brunswick, Victoria, aged 61. The cause of his death was chronic nephritis, uraemia and cardiac failure. Thomas O’CONNOR is buried at Fawkner Cemetery . Isabella O’CONNOR (nee MURPHY) lived 3 years in Western Australia and 93 years in Victoria. She died aged 96 years on 30 Mar 1969 at 25 McCracken Street, Essendon, Victoria. The cause of her death was cerebral thrombosis and generalised arteriosclerosis. She is buried at Fawkner Cemetery .

Sarah Elizabeth MURPHY, the fourth daughter son of William MURPHY and Sarah MURPHY (nee HARRISON), was born on 29 Sep 1875 at Woods Point, Victoria. Her parents were living at Woods Point where her father was a miner. Sarah MURPHY’s (nee HARRISON) mother, Mrs HARRISON, attended the birth. No doctor attended . Sarah Elizabeth is better known as Elizabeth Jane MURPHY , or just ‘Lizzie’. She married Bernard CORRIGAN (born in Bendigo, the son of Thomas CORRIGAN, police constable, and Elizabeth CORRIGAN (nee CLEARY) on 23 Oct 1907 at the Coburg Catholic Church. Bernard CORRIGAN was a farmer aged 37 and Lizzie was 32 years of age. They both resided at Woodstock, Victoria, at the time. Patrick CORRIGAN and Christina BARRY witnessed their marriage . Elizabeth Jane CORRIGAN (nee MURPHY) and Bernard CORRIGAN had 2 children, namely, Mary Veronica ‘Mollie’ CORRIGAN (born circa 1909 and married Albert Henry LEHMANN) and Monica Eileen ‘Eily’ CORRIGAN (born 1911 at Woodstock and married Edward PRATT). Bernard CORRIGAN died aged 50 years on 14 Mar 1921 at Woodstock from nephritis and heart failure. He is buried at the Epping Public Cemetery . Elizabeth Jane CORRIGAN (nee MURPHY) died at Kew, Victoria, on 16 Mar 1968. The multiple causes of her death were bronchopneumonia, cerebrovascular accident, cerebral arteriosclerosis and carcinoma of breast with cerebral secondaries. Her daughter, Mollie LEHMANN (nee CORRIGAN), was the informant according to the death certificate. Elizabeth Jane CORRIGAN (nee MURPHY) is buried with her husband at the Epping Public Cemetery . Albert Henry LEHMANN died in Oct 2002 .

Kevin Francis LEHMANN (born 1945) was the only son of Albert Henry LEHMANN and Mollie LEHMANN (nee CORRIGAN). Kevin LEHMANN married Margaret GRACEY (born 23 Aug 1947) and they had 3 girls, Sally (born 1973), Bettina (born 1975) and Claire (born 1978). Sally LEHMANN married Andrew JACOBS (born 28 Jul 1974) on 17 Feb 2001 and Bettina LEHMANN married Anthony LEJOVIC (born 17 Oct 1974) on 4 May 2002.

Edward PRATT and Monica PRATT (nee CORRIGAN) were married on 22 May 1937 and they had 2 daughters, Margaret Joan PRATT (born 29 Dec 1937) and Maureen Ann PRATT (born 1942). Margaret PRATT married John Edward HAGGER (born 26 May 1938) on 17 Dec 1960. Their children are Paul Edward HAGGER (born 1961), Leanne Elizabeth HAGGER (born 1964) and Nicole Louise HAGGER (born 1967). Margaret Joan HAGGER (nee PRATT) died on 4 Jun 1977). Maureen Ann Pratt married Norman Patrick TYRRELL (born 29 Dec 1935) on 3 Nov 1965. Their children are David Matthew TYRRELL (born 1967), Michael Anthony TYRRELL (born 1969), Fiona Mary TYRRELL (born 1973) and Matthew James TYRRELL (born 1976).

James Paden MURPHY, the third son of William MURPHY and Sarah MURPHY (nee HARRISON), was born on 28 Dec 1877 at Woods Point, Victoria. His parents were living at Woods Point where his father was a miner. Sarah MURPHY’s (nee HARRISON) mother, Mrs HARRISON, attended the birth. No doctor attended . James Paden MURPHY is also known as James Joseph MURPHY . James Paden MURPHY never married. His occupation was a farm worker. He died aged 84 on 7 Jun 1963 at Fitzroy, Victoria, but his usual place of residence was Howard Street, Epping. The multiple causes of his death were acute pulmonary oedema, myocardial ischaemia, generalised atherosclerosis, benign prostatomegaly and glaucoma. He is buried in the Epping Public Cemetery. His death certificate incorrectly states that he was born at Walhalla, Victoria .

George Davidson MURPHY, the fourth son of William MURPHY and Sarah MURPHY (nee HARRISON), was born on 1 Apr 1880 at Woods Point, Victoria. His parents were living at Woods Point where his father was a miner. Sarah MURPHY’s (nee HARRISON) mother, Mrs HARRISON, attended the birth. No doctor attended . George Davidson MURPHY was also known at times as George Joseph MURPHY . George Davidson MURPHY married Anne Veronica DOYLE (born at Woods Point 5 Apr 1884 to Michael DOYLE, blacksmith, and Anne Doyle (nee RUSH)) on 4 Jul 1914 at the Carmelite Church Middle Park. George Davidson MURPHY was a gas works stoker or labourer aged 34 who lived at 34 Moubray Street, Albert Park, Victoria. Anne Veronica MURPHY (nee DOYLE) was a domestic aged 30 whose address then was 34 Moubray Street, Albert Park, Victoria but her usual address was 29 Merton Street, Albert Park. The witnesses were Charles Roger BACKHOUSE and Elizabeth BACKHOUSE . George Davidson MURPHY and Anne MURPHY (nee DOYLE) had 7 children including twin boys, George ‘Lionel’ MURPHY (born 1914) and Thomas ‘Leister’ MURPHY (born 1914). The other children were Ann ‘Nancy’ MURPHY (born 1916), William John Mannix MURPHY (born Apr 1918 and died 6 May 1918), Francis James MURPHY (born 1919 and died 1919), Colin Doyle MURPHY (born 1920) and Kevin Daniel MURPHY (born 1925). George Davidson MURPHY lived at 234 Richardson Street, Middle Park, Victoria . He died on 1 Sep 1933, aged 53, at the Alfred Hospital, Prahran, Victoria. The cause of his death was bilateral bronchopneumonia and myocardial failure. He was buried at Fawkner Cemetery on 2 Sep 1933 . Anne Veronica MURPHY (nee DOYLE) died, aged 66, on 25 May 1950 at Prince Henry’s Hospital, South Melbourne. Her usual residence was 234 Richardson Street, Middle Park. The cause of her death was bronchopneumonia, peritonitis and carcinoma of caecum. Anne Veronica MURPHY (nee DOYLE) was buried at the Melbourne General Cemetery on 27 May 1950 .

Denis Andrew MURPHY, the fifth son of William MURPHY and Sarah MURPHY (nee HARRISON), was born 1882 at Woods Point, Victoria. Denis Andrew MURPHY was also known at times as Denis Patrick MURPHY . Denis MURPHY married Catherine Cecily RYAN (born 1886 to Thomas Patrick RYAN and Mary O’CONNOR at Woodstock) on 12 Sep 1917 at Sts Peter and Paul’s Church, Epping. Denis MURPHY was a farmer, aged 35, and Catherine MURPHY’s (nee RYAN) occupation was home duties. She was 30 years of age. Their usual residence was Woodstock. The witnesses were James MURPHY and Margaret RYAN . Denis MURPHY and Catherine MURPHY (nee RYAN) had 3 children, namely, Thomas William MURPHY (born 24 Dec 1918 and married Ellen Mary Mc PHERSON on 15 Feb 1947), Cecily ‘Kitty’ MURPHY (born 17 Apr 1920) and Alice MURPHY (born 15 Aug 1921 and died 25 Jun 2003, unmarried). Denis Patrick MURPHY died, aged 70, on 1 Jul 1953 at Eden Park via Whittlesea, Victoria. The cause of his death was organic heart failure and some infection probably rheumatic. Denis MURPHY is buried at the Epping Public Cemetery . Catherine MURPHY (nee RYAN) died in 1968, aged 82 . She is buried with her husband, Denis MURPHY, at the Epping Cemetery.

Thomas MURPHY and Ellen MURPHY (nee McPHERSON) had 2 children, Eileen Mary MURPHY (born 2 Jul 1952) and Thomas Patrick MURPHY (born 15 Oct 1957). Eileen MURPHY married Michael CONROY (born 24 Nov 1954) on 19 Jan 1985. They have 2 children, Sean Michael CONROY (1986) and Erin Margaret CONROY (1988). Thomas Patrick MURPHY married Kerrie Ann GOODWIN (born 2 Nov 1958) on 10 Oct 1981. They had 4 children, Adam Lawrence (1982), Jessica Ann (1985), Daniel Denis (1988) and Jason Thomas (1990).

Cecily ‘Kitty’ MURPHY married Jack SIMPSON (born 30 May 1918) on 12 Sep 1942 and they had 2 children, John Francis SIMPSON (1943) and Pamela Mary SIMPSON (1945). John SIMPSON married Pauline DILLON (born 24 Jan 1946) and they have 4 children, Geraldine SIMPSON(1968), Marita SIMPSON (1970), Richard SIMPSON (1973) and Joanne SIMPSON (1974). John SIMPSON and Pauline SIMPSON (nee DILLON) live at Corowa, New South Wales. Pamela SIMPSON married Ron LAFFAN (born 20 May 1941) on 13 Apr 1969 and they have 2 children, Rebecca LAFFAN (born 27 Feb 1971) and Clare LAFFAN (1974). Rebecca LAFFAN married D’Arcy LE CLAIRE on 29 Mar 2003. Pamela LAFFAN (nee SIMPSON) and Ron LAFFAN live at Wallan, Victoria. Jack SIMPSON, 85 years, lives with them.


Children of George Davidson MURPHY and Anne Veronica MURPHY (nee DOYLE)

George Davidson MURPHY and Anne MURPHY (nee DOYLE) were my grandparents.

The first two children of George Davidson MURPHY and Anne Veronica MURPHY (nee DOYLE) were twin boys, George ‘Lionel’ MURPHY and Thomas ‘Leister’ MURPHY.

George ‘Lionel’ MURPHY was born on 1 Dec 1914 at 178 Richardson Street, Albert Park, Victoria. His birth certificate states that he is the ‘elder of twins’ . He was more commonly known as Lionel than George. Lionel MURPHY was a timber worker who worked in sawmills mainly in Cabbage Tree Creek, Gippsland, Victoria (on 2 different occasions) and in Brooklyn, Victoria. He also worked in Darwin for 3 years in timber forests. His principal role in the sawmill was as a tallyman. Lionel MURPHY did some mining in his early working life. Lionel MURPHY aged 21 married Margaret May POWELL (daughter of Thomas James POWELL, engine driver, and Beatrice Lillian POWELL (nee GLADMAN), a dressmaker, who was born at Carlton, Victoria, on 15 Jan 1913), aged 22, on 13 Jul 1935. They were married at St Ambrose’s Church, Brunswick, Victoria. Their usual residence was 60 Hope Street, Brunswick. The witnesses were Margaret’s brother, Francis James POWELL and Margaret Mary GORDON . Lionel MURPHY and Margaret MURPHY (nee POWELL) had 10 children (Colin Patrick MURPHY (born 1 May 1936 died 23 Nov 1936), Lawrence John MURPHY (born 1937), Margaret Beatrice Ann MURPHY (born 20 May 1939 died 20 May 1939), Lionel George MURPHY (born 1940), Robert ‘Leslie’ MURPHY (born 1942), Gregory Thomas MURPHY (born 1945), Daryl Francis MURPHY (born 1947), Kevin Daniel MURPHY (born 1950), Grant Joseph Daly MURPHY (born 1952) and Peter Gerard MURPHY (born 1957). Lionel MURPHY died, aged 61, on 26 Oct 1976 at Dandenong Hospital, Victoria. Lionel MURPHY and Margaret MURPHY (nee POWELL) resided at 15 Ross Street, Dandenong. The cause of his death was chronic congestive cardiac failure and chronic obstructive airways disease. He is buried at Fawkner Cemetery . Margaret MURPHY (nee POWELL) died 27 Feb 2000, aged 87, at Footscray General Hospital. She is buried with her husband, and first son (Colin Patrick), at Fawkner Cemetery.

Thomas ‘Leister’ MURPHY was born on 1 Dec 1914 at 178 Richardson Street, Albert Park, Victoria. He is the younger of the twins. He was more commonly known as Leister than Thomas. Leister MURPHY was a bar steward. Leister MURPHY married Honora Ellen ‘Nellie’ RAINFORD (born on 15 Jul 1923 at Morwell, Victoria, to William John RAINFORD and Ellen Louisa Florence RAINFORD (nee NEATE)) on 28 Apr 1945 at St Kilda, Victoria. Leister MURPHY and Nellie MURPHY (nee RAINFORD) had 3 children, namely, Helen Therese MURPHY (born 1946), Dennis Leister MURPHY (born 8 Nov 1948 and died 21 Jul 1963) and Joan Ann MURPHY (born 1950)). Leister MURPHY died, aged 75, on 18 Nov 1989 and is buried in the Melbourne General Cemetery. Nellie MURPHY (nee RAINFORD) divorced Leister MURPHY and married Arthur James COTTER on 19 Oct 1970 in the Wesley Church Melbourne. After Arthur’s death, Nellie married Tony MANDILE and she lives on the Gold Coast in Queensland.

The only daughter of George Davidson MURPHY and Anne MURPHY (nee DOYLE), Ann ‘Nancy’ MURPHY, was born on 3 Apr 1916 at South Melbourne, Victoria. Nancy MURPHY married Roy COX (born on 27 Jul 1909 at Corowa, Victoria) on 18 Oct 1941. Nancy COX (nee MURPHY) and Roy COX had 2 children, namely, Elaine COX (born 1942) and Denise COX (born 1944). Denise Cox married Allan John LEUNG (born 19 Jun 1944) on 9 Jan 1971 and they have 2 daughters, Vanessa Marie (1975) and Simone Elizabeth (1978). Vanessa married Gary WHITE (born 4 Jan 1966) on 3 Nov 2001. Roy COX died, aged 82, on 29 Dec 1991 at Albert Park Victoria. He is buried at the Necropolis, Springvale Cemetery, Victoria. Nancy COX (nee MURPHY) died, aged 82, on 27 Sep 1998 at Caulfield, Victoria. She is also buried at the Necropolis, Springvale Cemetery.

George Davidson MURPHY and Anne Veronica MURPHY (nee DOYLE) then had 2 boys both of whom died at an early age. William John Mannix MURPHY was born Apr 1918 and died 6 May 1918) and Francis James MURPHY was born and died in 1919.

The next child of George Davidson MURPHY and Anne Veronica MURPHY (nee DOYLE) was Colin Doyle MURPHY (born 12 Oct 1920). Colin Doyle MURPHY was also known as Colin Patrick MURPHY. Colin MURPHY married Maisie DEGINHARDT (born 6 Aug 1923 to Alfred Edward DEGINHARDT and May Louise DEGINHARDT (nee RIPPER)) on 22 Apr 1948 at the Mt Carmel Catholic Church in Middle Park, Victoria. Colin MURPHY was a glazier. Colin MURPHY and Maisie MURPHY (nee DEGINHARDT) had 3 children Terrence Michael MURPHY (born 1949), Colin ‘John’ Patrick MURPHY (born 1952) and Sharon Louise MURPHY (born 1962). Terry MURPHY married Bev MALCOLM and they have 2 children, Trevor MURPHY (1968) and Leigh MURPHY (1971). John MURPHY married Helen Ann PILBEAM (born 19 Nov 1953) on 30 Jun 1973. They have 3 children, Glen (1973), Leonie (1977) and Briony (1980). Sharon MURPHY married Steve PATRICK. Colin MURPHY died, aged 49, on 23 Oct 1969 and Maisie died, aged 79, in Mar 2003.

The final child of George Davidson MURPHY and Anne Veronica MURPHY (nee DOYLE) is Kevin Daniel MURPHY. He was born 19 Jan 1925 at Albert Park, Victoria. Kevin married Aileen Patricia SCHULTZ (born 24 Nov 1929 at Wodonga, Victoria) on 25 Jan 1958. Kevin MURPHY and Aileen MURPHY (nee SCHULTZ) have 2 children, namely, Gerard MURPHY (born 1958) and Ann MURPHY (born 1960). Gerard MURPHY married Bernadette Ann EGAN (born 20 Aug 1958) on 12 Jan 1983 and they have 4 children, Bridget Marie (1984), Patrick Daniel (1986), Thomas Edward (1988) and Kathleen Mary (1994). Ann MURPHY married Warren John HOLST (born 19 Sep 1960) on 17 Dec 1989. They have 3 children, Clare Ann (1989), Elizabeth Megan (1991) and Michael Joel (1996).


Children of George ‘Lionel’ MURPHY and Margaret May MURPHY (nee POWELL)

George ‘Lionel’ MURPHY and Margaret May MURPHY (nee POWELL) were my parents.

The first son of Lionel MURPHY and Margaret MURPHY (nee POWELL) was Colin Patrick MURPHY. He was born on 1 May 1936 in Melbourne, Victoria, and died on 23 Nov 1936. He is buried with his parents at Fawkner Cemetery.

The eldest living son of Lionel MURPHY and Margaret MURPHY (nee POWELL) is Lawrence John MURPHY. He was born on 12 Oct 1937. Lawrence MURPHY – at times known as ‘Laurie’ - was a semi-trailer driver, initially carting goods interstate but, later in his working career, within Victoria (and mainly in the Melbourne metropolitan area). He retired in October 2002. Lawrence MURPHY married Patricia EGAN (born 7 Jul 1938 to William EGAN and Ellen Celia EGAN (nee TRACEY)) on 13 Oct 1956 at St Fidelis Catholic Church, Coburg, Victoria. They have 3 children, namely, Colin John MURPHY (born 1957), Stephen Lawrence MURPHY (born 1959) and Leslie Robert MURPHY (born 1960). Lawrence MURPHY and Patricia MURPHY (nee EGAN) live at Craigieburn, Victoria 3064. Colin MURPHY, like his father, is a semi-trailer transport driver. He had 2 children with Jenny WALKER, namely, Kelly (1984) and Adam (1986) before marrying Jackie WRIGHT. Colin MURPHY and Jackie MURPHY (nee WRIGHT) had 3 children, Catherine (1989), Maryanne (1990) and David (1992). Colin Murphy and Jackie MURPHY (nee WRIGHT) were then divorced and Colin lives with Janette WALSH at Craigieburn, Victoria. Stephen MURPHY, like his father, is also a semi-trailer transport driver. He married Leanne WILSON (born 16 Aug 1960) on 21 Feb 1981 and they have 3 children, Jarryd Michael (1987), Tristen (1988) and Trent Ashley (1992). They live at Sunbury, Victoria. Leslie MURPHY, an aircraft mechanic, married Mandy OLIVER (born 14 Aug 1963) on 12 Jan 1984. They have 3 children, Danica Jane (1990) and twin boys (born in 1992) Dylan James and Kane Lawrence. They also live at Sunbury, Victoria.

The only daughter of Lionel MURPHY and Margaret MURPHY (nee POWELL) was Beatrice Margaret Ann MURPHY. She was born on 20 May 1939 but unfortunately died the same day.

The next son of Lionel MURPHY and Margaret MURPHY (nee POWELL) is Lionel George MURPHY. He was born on 11 Nov 1940. Lionel George MURPHY is better known in the family as ‘Lonnie’. Lonnie MURPHY is a qualified cabinet-maker by trade. He is a registered builder working in the Brisbane metropolitan area who specialises in architect-designed homes and home renovations. He built the Raun Raun Theatre at Goroka in the highlands of Papua New Guinea. Lonnie MURPHY married twice ((to Dianne ELDERFIELD and then to Pamela YOUNG) but each ended in divorce. He now lives with Wendy HARLEY at Chelmer, Queensland 4068. He has never had any children.

The next son of Lionel MURPHY and Margaret MURPHY (nee POWELL) is Robert ‘Leslie’ MURPHY. He was born on 19 Jul 1942 at the Queen Victoria Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria. Robert ‘Leslie’ MURPHY is better known in the family as ‘Les’. Les MURPHY was initially a jockey in Victoria. More recently he has worked in the commercial field, mainly as a bookkeeper. He married Patricia PATON (born 22 Oct 1944 to Jack PATON and Joan PATON (nee PILKINGTON?)) on 13 Jan 1962 at St Brendan’s Catholic Church, Flemington, Victoria. Les MURPHY and Patricia MURPHY (nee PATON) have 3 children, namely, Karen Lee MURPHY (born 1962), Mandy Therese MURPHY (born 1964) and Shaun Andrew MURPHY (born 1971). Mandy MURPHY married Peter ARGUS (born 2 Nov 1962) on 7 Jan 1984. Shaun MURPHY married Tanya BOTTERELL (born May 1971) on 3 Oct 1998. They have 2 children, Darcy James (2001) and Brydie (2003). Les MURPHY and Patricia MURPHY (nee PATON) live at East Keilor, Victoria 3033.

The next son of Lionel MURPHY and Margaret MURPHY (nee POWELL) is Dr Gregory Thomas MURPHY. He was born on 4 May 1945. Gregory (‘Greg’) MURPHY was educated at St Patrick’s College, Sale, Victoria. He completed an Arts degree and a Diploma of Education at Melbourne University. The title ‘Dr’ arises because Greg MURPHY was later awarded a Doctor of Philosophy. He started his working career as a secondary school teacher. More recently he has been working for the University of Papua New Guinea in Madang as a Senior Lecturer. Greg MURPHY was the founding director of the Raun Raun Theatre in Papua New Guinea. He takes a particularly keen interest in PNG culture in all its forms. Greg MURPHY has never married. He lives with a PNG family (which he has adopted) in Madang, Papua New Guinea.

The next son of Lionel MURPHY and Margaret MURPHY (nee POWELL) is myself, Daryl Francis MURPHY. I was born on 18 Feb 1947. I was educated at St Patrick’s College, Sale, Victoria, matriculating in 1963. I started work in the Australian Taxation Office in Jan 1964. I gained qualifications in accountancy and law by part-time studies. I was awarded a Certified Practising Accountant certificate in Melbourne and a law degree from the Australian National University in Canberra. I retired in Feb 2002 after 38 years public service as a tax collector. I married Maureen Therese KELLY (born 20 Jul 1946 to James Andrew KELLY, farmer at Watchupga, Victoria, and Mary Agnes KELLY (nee DORAN)) on 30 Jan 1971 at St Thomas Aquinas Church, South Yarra. We have had 5 children, namely, Brenton Phillip MURPHY (born 17 Nov 1971), Bevan James MURPHY (born 9 Nov 1973), Damon William MURPHY (born stillborn on 9 Nov 1977), Sarah Louise MURPHY (born 31 Jun 1980) and Celia Therese Agnes MURPHY (born 25 Jul 1982). Maureen and I moved from Melbourne to Canberra after our marriage in 1971 and from Canberra to Brisbane in Jan 1994. We live at 25 Kensington Place, Wishart, Queensland 4122. Brenton MURPHY married Sophie Louise CARTWRIGHT (born 2 Jun 1971) on 3 Mar 2001. They live in Canberra with their son, Jude Ryan MURPHY, born 24 Oct 2003. Bevan MURPHY married Dr Kristina (‘Tina’) Lee TRYNES (born 27 Nov 1973) on 26 Feb 2000.

The next son of Lionel MURPHY and Margaret MURPHY (nee POWELL) is Kevin Daniel MURPHY. He was born on 29 May 1950. Kevin MURPHY was educated at Footscray Technical College and Maribyrnong High School, Victoria. He completed an Economics degree at Monash University. He started his working career as a secondary school teacher. More recently, he has been working in the oil industry. Kevin MURPHY married Mary TZIANTZIS (born 27 Nov 1949 to Peter and Anna TZIANTZIS) on 10 Jul 1971. Kevin MURPHY and Mary MURPHY (nee TZIANTZIS) have 2 children, namely, Claire MURPHY (born 12 May 1978) and Daniel MURPHY (born 12 May 1980). They live at Strathmore, Victoria 3041.

The next son of Lionel MURPHY and Margaret MURPHY (nee POWELL) is Grant Joseph MURPHY. He was born on 3 Mar 1952 in Darwin NT. Grant MURPHY was educated at Footscray Technical College, Victoria. Grant MURPHY’s working career has been in the Australian Taxation Office. Grant MURPHY married Gaye STAFFORD-BUSH (born 7 Nov 1956 in New Zealand) on 7 Feb 1981 at Carlton, Victoria. Grant MURPHY and Gaye MURPHY (nee STAFFORD-BUSH) have 3 children. They are Jane Lesley MURPHY (born 1 Aug 1984), David MURPHY (born 2 Oct 1986) and Rachel Emily MURPHY (born 1 Apr 1991). Jane and Rachel were born in the Republic of Seychelles and David was born at Townsville, Queensland. Grant MURPHY and Gaye MURPHY (nee STAFFORD-BUSH) live at Corinda, Queensland 4075.

The final son of Lionel MURPHY and Margaret MURPHY (nee POWELL) is Peter Gerard MURPHY. He was born on 10 Jul 1957. Peter MURPHY’s working career has been with Jayco Caravans at Dandenong, Victoria where he is now the General Manager. Peter MURPHY married Heather MILES (born 19 Jul 1961 to Wes and Joyce MILES) on 26 Feb 1982. Peter MURPHY and Heather MURPHY (nee MILES) have no children. They live at Abbotsford, Victoria 3067.

Daryl Francis Murphy
As at 10 March 2006
Queensland
Australia

B. MURPHYs of County Wexford

Dennis MURPHY was Daryl MURPHY’s great great grandfather. He was the son of Phillip MURPHY and Mary LAMPORT. Dennis MURPHY was born c 1812 in County Wexford, Ireland, and was baptised on 3 December 1812 at St Mary’s Catholic Church for the combined parishes of Mayglass and Ballymore, Diocese of Ferns, Barony of Forth, County Wexford.

[source: a 'Birth and Baptismal Certificate' being an extract from the Register of Baptisms of the combined parish Church of Mayglass and Ballymore, County Wexford. The certificate was provided to me on 29 Sep 1987 by Rev Nicholas Doyle PP from Ballymore. It reads:

'Diocese of Ferns Parish of Ballymore/Mayglass

On examination of the Register of Baptisms of above Parish I certify that according to it Dennis MURPHY, Bog, Mayglass, was born on … day of …, and was baptised according to the Rites of the Catholic Church on 3rd day of December 1812 in the Church of St Mary's Ballymore by the Rev., ….

Parents : Phillip MURPHY
Mary LAMPORT

Sponsors: Patrick BROWN
Catherin FURLONG].

Dennis had at least one brother, James MURPHY, and possibly another brother, Walter MURPHY.

James MURPHY was baptised on 23 March 1823 at the Mayglass Catholic Church.

[source: a 'Birth and Baptismal Certificate' being an extract from the Register of Baptisms of the combined parish Church of Mayglass and Ballymore, County Wexford. The certificate was provided to me on 22 July2003 by Rev Nicholas Doyle PP from Ballymore. It reads:

‘Parish of Ballymore/Mayglass Diocese of Ferns

On examination of the Register of Baptisms of above Parish I certify that according to it James MURPHY was born on the … day of …, and was baptised according to the Rites of the Catholic Church on the 23rd day of March 1823 in the Church of Mayglass by the Rev., ….

Parents : Philip MURPHY
Mary LAMBERT

Sponsors: William LAMBERT
Johanna FURLONG].

Walter MURPHY was born c 1822 in County Wexford and died 29 May 1855 at Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

[sources: The Irish Family History Federation's Central Signposting Index records a birth/baptism for Walter MURPHY in County Wexford in 1822 [www.irishgenealogy.ie/csi/all_counties/csi.cfm]. Other Walter MURPHY entries appear for 1820 and 1821.

Like Dennis MURPHY, Walter MURPHY was listed as a passenger on the clipper ship 'Shalimar' on its arrival in February 1855 in Melbourne. His age was shown as 30 years. Walter may have accompanied Dennis MURPHY - who emigrated from Mayglass, County Wexford, Ireland, with his spouse, Jane Elizabeth MURPHY (nee WHEELOCK), and family on the 'Shalimar'.

Unfortunately, Walter died only 3 months after his arrival in Australia from febris pneumonia.

What, if any, relationship existed between Walter MURPHY and my MURPHY ancestors is uncertain but he may have been another son of Phillip MURPHY and Mary LAMPORT. He was born in Wexford, Ireland, in or about 1823, according to his death certificate. He may have been a brother of James MURPHY and Dennis MURPHY.

The informant on Walter MURPHY's death certificate, Philip WILSON, was not a family member].

Dennis MURPHY married Jane Elizabeth WHEELOCK (b c1816 Ballybeg, Killinick, chrsd 20 August 1816, Tacumshane (Protestant) Church – d 30 May 1878, Melbourne, Victoria) on 26 July 1839 at the Mayglass Catholic Church.

[source: a Certificate of Marriage being an extract from the Marriage Register of the Church of Mayglass, County Wexford, provided on 29 Sep 1987 by Rev Nicholas Doyle PP. It reads:

'Parish of Ballymore/Mayglass Diocese of Ferns

EXTRACT FROM THE MARRIAGE REGISTER

Dennis MURPHY and Jane WHEELICK [This should, in fact read, WHEELOCK] were married in the Church of Mayglass (Chapel Ballymore) according to the Rite of the Catholic Church, on the 26th day of July 1839.

The witnesses were Dennis MEANY and Margaret DUGAN']

Dennis/Denis MURPHY died 18 November 1895 at Woodstock, Shire of Epping, Victoria, and was buried on 20 November 1895 at the Melbourne General Cemetery. According to his death certificate, Denis MURPHY was born at Mayglass, Wexford, Ireland, and he was a cab proprietor. His tombstone reads:

'Erected by
Mary O'Sullivan
In loving memory of her father
DENIS MURPHY
Native of Mayglass Co. Wexford Ireland
Who died 18.11.1895 Aged 80 years
Also her mother
JANE E. MURPHY
Who died 29 May 1878 Aged 58 years
Also her brother
JAMES
The beloved husband of
ANNIE MURPHY
Who died 3.4.1882 Aged 30 years
Also her sister
JANE E. MURPHY
Who died 19.2.1887 Aged 30 years
Requiescat in Pace'

Dennis MURPHY and Jane Elizabeth MURPHY (nee WHEELOCK) had the following children, the first 5 of whom were born in County Wexford:

* William James MURPHY (c1841 – 1909)
* Mary MURPHY (1843 – 1936)
* Philip Charles MURPHY (c1845 - )
* James MURPHY (c1852 – 1882)
* Jane Elizabeth MURPHY (c1854 – 1887)
* Catherine MURPHY (c1857 – 1858)

Birth and Baptismal Certificates for the first 3 children read as follows:

'Diocese of Ferns Parish of Ballymore/Mayglass

On examination of the Register of Baptisms of above Parish I certify that according to it William James MURPHY, East Bog, Mayglass, was born on … day of …, and was baptised according to the Rites of the Catholic Church on 14th day of November 1841 in the Church of Ballymore by the Rev., ….

Parents : Dennis MURPHY
Jane WHEELICK

Sponsors: James STAFFORD
Mary DILLON.’

'Diocese of Ferns Parish of Ballymore/Mayglass

On examination of the Register of Baptisms of above Parish I certify that according to it Mary MURPHY was born on … day of …, and was baptised according to the Rites of the Catholic Church on 4th day of June1843 in the Church of Mayglass by the Rev., ….

Parents : Dennis MURPHY, East Bog, Mayglass
Jane WHEELICK

Sponsors: Dennis MEANY
Catherine MURPHY.’

'Diocese of Ferns Parish of Ballymore/Mayglass

On examination of the Register of Baptisms of above Parish I certify that according to it Philip Charles MURPHY was born on … day of …, and was baptised according to the Rites of the Catholic Church on 11th day of April 1845 in the Church of Mayglass by the Rev., ….

Parents : Dennis MURPHY, East Bog, Mayglass
Jane WHEELICK

Sponsors: James MURPHY
Ellen MURPHY.’

Dennis MURPHY and Jane MURPHY (nee WHEELOCK) and their children immigrated to Australia from, County Wexford, Ireland. The 'Shalimar', 1467 tons register, the ninth ship of the White Star line, left the Port of Liverpool on 22 November 1854 and was on its first voyage. It was under the command of captain Amos Robertson. The 'Shalimar' was a clipper ship. It accomplished the run 'in something under 76 days' (The 'Argus', Melbourne, Victoria, Friday 9 Feb 1855, page 4), arriving in Melbourne on 9 February 1855. Included in the shipping passenger list were Dennis MURPHY (35), Jane MURPHY (30), William MURPHY (13), Mary MURPHY (10), Philip MURPHY (7), James MURPHY (4), and Jane MURPHY (infant). The family was accompanied by Christopher JEFFARES/JEFFERS (27 years). Christopher was apparently a relative of Jane WHEELOCK, his mother's maiden name being Mary WHEELOCK. Christopher JEFFERS died unmarried at 60 years on 23 Mar 1889 and is buried at the Epping Cemetery, Victoria, in the same grave as William James MURPHY. Walter MURPHY, aged 30 years, was also listed as a passenger on the 'Shalimar' on its arrival in February 1855 but what, if any, relationship exists between him and my MURPHY ancestors is presently unknown.


Dennis and Jane MURPHY had one more child after their arrival in Victoria, Catherine MURPHY, but she died at 14 months on 6 Aug 1858. Dennis and Jane MURPHY were living off Queensberry Street, North Melbourne at the time. Dennis' occupation was a carter. Jane MURPHY (nee WHEELOCK) died at Lothian Street, Hotham at 58 years of age on 30 May 1878, some 23 years after her arrival in Victoria. The cause of her death was organic disease of liver and stomach ulceration. She is buried at the Melbourne General Cemetery. Dennis MURPHY died at Woodstock, Shire of Epping, Victoria, on 18 Nov 1895 at 82 years of age. Dennis had been a cab proprietor and he had lived for 40 years in Victoria after his arrival from Ireland. His cause of death was heart disease and senile decay. The names of his parents were not known.

The following is an extract from the late Leslie BOXWELL's email of 6 Jan 2003 about Denis/Dennis MURPHY in County Wexford, Ireland:

'I looked at the Tithes for 1827 and 1828.

In 1827 Patrick Murphy had a half acre at Bog East. Denis Murphy had seven & half acres at Colespit & Bog West. Philip Murphy had eight & three quarter acres at Colespit & Bog West.

In 1828 Widow Walsh had 50 acres @ Bog East. Denis Murphy had seven & half acres at Colespit & Bog West. Paid 7shillings & 6 pence tithes. Philip Murphy had 8 & three quarter acres at Colespit & Bog West and Randalstown. Paid 8 shillings & 9 pence tithe.

I wonder was Patrick the father of Philip!

In 1853, the index to Griffiths Primary Valuation Survey shows that Denis Murphy had land at Bog West, Colespit, and Randalstown. I have yet to look at the actual amounts of land he held and at which there was house.'


Fintan MURPHY a friend and correspondent of Woodtown, Mayglass, Bridgetown, Co Wexford - but not yet established to be a relative - whose family originated in the townland of Courtlands East (which shares a boundary with Bog East) - emailed me on Monday, 25 December 2006 and said:

'I had heard that there were some descendants, alive in Co Wexford, of the KINGS who were the last inhabitants of the house in Bog East, or rather the furthest back in living or reputed memory, of the house believed to have been MURPHYs, or on the site of MURPHYs.

The names given to me were Nancy KELLY, of Harperstown, Taghmon, and Bernadette DONOVAN, of Rourke's Cross, Deer Park, Foulksmills, Co Wexford.

Anyway last week I plucked up courage and headed off to both addresses. There was no reply at the house identified as Nancy KELLY's. However at the other I first met Martin DONOVAN, and explained my errand, and later his wife returned, and I chatted to her. She told me her parents were James KING and Margaret KING nee FURLONG. She was also able to tell me that her mother's mother had been one Margaret BRADY. She didn't know what her father's (James KING) mother's maiden name was. She had never heard of a MURPHY connection, but recognised Bog East as an address spoken about by her late brother, also James, commonly called "Pem", KING, who had died in Canada last year aged 82.

I don't know what age Bernadette would be - mid-seventies I suppose. She referred to another sister, Susan, who is I think in Canada also, and said she normally rings up over Christmas, and she would ask her if she would know what her grandmother KING's maiden name was.

Well I just had a phonecall this morning from Martin DONOVAN to say that Susan says their grandmother on the KING side was one Bridget Josephine MURPHY of Bog East.

That was all the information he had for me, but I hope it brightens your Christmas.

I know that Pem KING acted in a play with my father in approx 1948, but the Bossman never alluded to any possible connection to us, unfortunately.

However, while WE may not be related, you can be fairly sure that Bernadette DONOVAN and Nancy KELLY are very likely cousins of yours at some remove.'

[The Irish Family History Federation's Central Signposting Index records a marriage for Bridget MURPHY and James KING in County Wexford in 1883 [www.irishgenealogy.ie/csi/all_counties/csi.cfm].]

Fintan MURPHY later sent to me a marriage certificate for Bridget MURPHY of West Bog (daughter of John MURPHY, farmer) to James KING of Bridgetown for their marriage on 1 Feb 1883 in the Catholic Chapel of Mayglass. The witnesses were John KING and Mary MURPHY.


Watch the video: Charlie Murphys True Hollywood Stories: Rick James u0026 Prince - Chappelles Show (January 2022).