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Lockheed XR3O

Lockheed XR3O

Lockheed XR3O

The Lockheed R3O was the designation for two versions of the Model 10 Electra used by the US Navy, one purchased for the Navy and one impressed during the Second World War

The XR3O-1 was delivered to the US Coast Guard on 9 April 1936. It was based on the Model 10-B and was powered by two Wright R-975E-3 engines. It was used as a personal transport by the Secretary of the Treasury

The Lockheed Model 10 Electra was one of the first aircraft to be designed after Robert Gross took over Lockheed in 1932. It was a twin engined airliner, with low mounted tapered wings, a high mounted tail with twin vertical control surfaces at the ends and a flat sided fuselage. The standard version had a series of cabin windows, with the passenger door on the left side of the fuselage, half way between the wings and the tail. The same basic layout would be used on a long series of Lockheed airlines, all of which sold in reasonable numbers, while being out-shadowed by the Douglas DC-2/ DC-3 family.

The XR3O-1 had originally been ordered as an identical aircraft to the Pratt & Whitney powered R2O-1, but by the time it arrived the engines had been changed to the Wright R-975E-3, and the interior had been modified so it could be quickly be changed from a VIP transport into an air ambulance. It remained in military service until the end of the Second World War, when it was sold into civil service. It was one of the longest serving Electras, before ditching on a beach in 1967.

The designation R3O-2 was given to a single example of the six-seat Lockheed 12-A Electra Jr that was impressed for military service during the Second World War.

Engine: Two Wright R-975-E3 air cooled radials
Power: 440hp each
Crew: 2
Wing span: 55ft
Length: 38ft 7in
Gross weight: 10,100lb
Maximum weight: 143,600lb
Maximum speed: 205mph


Lockheed XR3O - History

To Sky Kraft, Mobile, AL with new c/r NC33615.

From Circa September 1941 to 1944

Taken on Strength/Charge with the United States Navy with BuNo 02947 as a XR3O-2.

Taken on Strength/Charge with the Royal Air Force with s/n D2947.

To F. Sidney Cotton with new c/r G-AGTL.

To K. MC Alpine, Fairoaks keeping c/r G-AGTL.

To Escadrille Mercure S. A with new c/r F-BJJY.
Polished aluminium.

To Jean-Marie Chapeau keeping c/r F-BJJY.


Photographer: Ken Videan
Notes: At Yeovilton.

To Paul Bouchon/Phillipe Denis keeping c/r F-BJJY.

To Jean-Luc Langeard keeping c/r F-BJJY.

To Jean-Luc Langeard with new c/r F-AZLL.

To Lixxbail keeping c/r F-AZLL.


Photographer: David Blaker
Notes: Photographed at the Flying Legends display 2005, Duxford, England

Certificate of airworthiness for F-AZLL (12 A, 1287) issued.

To Le Gros Biplan Rouge Sarl, Andernos Les Bains, Aquitaine Nord keeping c/r F-AZLL.
Markings added: NR16020
Last CR action date noted here.


Photographer: Nigel Hitchman
Notes: At La Ferte Alais, Paris, France


Photographer: Nigel Hitchman
Notes: At La Ferte Alais, Paris, France


How the Lockheed U-2 spy plane was shot down in May 1960.

Dogfights have always attracted attention. Since the First World War, their participants have been considered heroes, stories have been written about nothing, and they have become idols of generations. However, the reality of air combat is much more prosaic. Whatever the motivation of the pilots to fight, there was always a winner on one side and a loser on the other in a crippled or burning plane falling to the ground. This series deals with the struggle from their beginning to the modern age, when the sky is steadily ruled by jet engines.


List of aircraft of the United States during World War II

United States Coast Guard List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_section_1

List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_unordered_list_0

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United States Navy List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_section_2

List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_unordered_list_1

    observation/liaison/trainer List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_13 trainer List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_14 transport List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_15 transport List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_16 fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_17 jet fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_18 heavy bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_19 heavy bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_20 impressed flying boat transport List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_21 prototype carrier-based fighter-bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_22 flying boat/patrol bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_23 carrier-based fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_24 carrier-based scout bomber/trainer List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_25 carrier-based scout bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_26 transport List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_27 transport List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_28 patrol bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_29 patrol bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_30 seaplane patrol bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_31 flying boat/patrol bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_32 flying boat/patrol bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_33 radio-controlled drone List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_34 radio-controlled drone List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_35 biplane fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_36 transport List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_37 prototype carrier-based fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_38 carrier-based scout bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_39 carrier-based dive bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_40 observation aircraft List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_41 observation aircraft List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_42 ASW aircraft List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_43 trainer List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_44 attack bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_45 carrier-based torpedo bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_46 attack bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_47 amphibian flying boat transport List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_48 transport List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_49 transport List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_50 transport List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_51 transport List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_52 carrier-based dive bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_53 carrier-based torpedo bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_54 liaison List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_55 liaison/trainer List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_56 carrier-based fighter/bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_57 carrier-based fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_58 target drone (withdrawn as carrier bomber) List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_59 carrier-based fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_60 carrier-based fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_61 carrier-based prototype fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_62 carrier-based fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_63 carrier-based fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_64 carrier-based fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_65 flying boat List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_66 flying boat List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_67 amphibian shipboard spotter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_68 amphibian shipboard spotter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_69 carrier-based torpedo-bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_70 liaison/ambulance aircraft List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_71 assault drone List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_72 transport/gunnery trainer List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_73 transport List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_74 transport List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_75 patrol bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_76 patrol bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_77 patrol bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_78 -1 fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_79 medium bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_80 transport flying boat 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aircraft List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_93 training glider List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_94 carrier-based mixed-propulsion fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_95 trainer List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_96 training glider List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_97 helicopter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_98 helicopter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_99 helicopter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_100 transport amphibian List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_101 impressed transport flying boat List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_102 patrol flying boat List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_103 trainer List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_104 observation/liaison aircraft List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_105 trainer/utility aircraft List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_106 trainer List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_107 observation/liaison aircraft List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_108 trainer List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_109 carrier-based fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_110 scout List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_111 observation aircraft List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_112 carrier-based dive bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_113 carrier-based dive bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_1_114 carrier-based torpedo-bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War 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United States Marine Corps List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_section_3

List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_unordered_list_2

    ://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allied_Aviation_XLRA List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_2_120 fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_2_121 patrol bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_2_122 transport List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_2_123 dive bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_2_124 dive bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_2_125 attack/medium bomber/target tug List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_2_126 amphibian transport List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_2_127 transport List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_2_128 transport List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_2_129 transport List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_2_130 dive bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_2_131 fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_2_132 fighter/night fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_2_133 amphibian transport List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_2_134 torpedo bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_2_135 -2 transport List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_2_136 transport List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_2_137 patrol bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_2_138 attack/medium bomber/target tug List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_2_139 attack/medium bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_2_140 trainer List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_2_141 night fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_2_142 training glider List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_2_143 training glider List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_2_144 observation/liaison aircraft List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_2_145 “ Fighter bomber /night fighter “ List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_2_146 dive bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_2_147

United States Army Air Forces List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_section_4

List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_unordered_list_3

    observation/liaison aircraft List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_148 trainer List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_149 trainer List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_150 prototype attack bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_151 transport/trainer List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_152 advanced trainer List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_153 interceptor List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_154 fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_155 jet fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_156 fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_157 prototype lightweight fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_158 fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War 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List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_171 fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_172 prototype ground attack aircraft List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_173 radio-controlled target aircraft List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_174 radio-controlled target aircraft List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_175 attack bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_176 /Curtiss A-18 Shrike attack bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_177 advanced twin-engine pilot trainer List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_178 transport List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_179 transport List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_180 observation aircraft List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_181 fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_182 fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_183 prototype fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_184 prototype fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_185 fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_186 prototype fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_187 Army SB2C dive bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_188 reconnaissance aircraft List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_189 attack bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_190 attack bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_191 prototype bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_192 ASW/medium bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_193 prototype heavy bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_194 medium bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_195 transport List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_196 transport List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_197 transport List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_198 (ex-Dutch Douglas DC-5) transport List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_199 observation aircraft List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_200 observation aircraft List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_201 observation aircraft List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_202 Army SBD dive bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_203 Army JRF flying boat List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_204 Army J4F patrol aircraft List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_205 liaison aircraft/trainer List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_206 advanced/gunnery trainer List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_207 primary trainer List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_208 - Ansons purchased for Lend-Lease as bomber trainer List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_209 prototype fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_210 basic trainer List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_211 liaison aircraft List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_212 observation/liaison aircraft List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_213 executive transport List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_214 executive transport List of aircraft of the United States during World War 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during World War II_item_3_227 transport List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_228 dive bomber/attack aircraft List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_229 medium bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_230 prototype medium bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_231 basic trainer List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_232 basic trainer List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_233 basic combat trainer List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_234 advanced trainer List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_235 observation aircraft List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_236 fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_237 fighter/advanced trainer List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_238 List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_239 attack aircraft List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_240 prototype fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_241 night fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_242 prototype interceptor List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_243 observation/liaison aircraft List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_244 fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_245 fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_246 prototype fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_247 /PT-22 Recruit primary trainer List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_248 primary trainer List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_249 advanced trainer List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_250 basic trainer List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_251 fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_252 & R-6 Hoverfly helicopters List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_253 helicopter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_254 trainer List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_255 observation/liaison aircraft List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_256 liaison aircraft List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_257 fighter/reconnaissance List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_258 observation/liaison aircraft List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_259 dive bomber List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_260 basic trainer List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_261 prototype fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_262 fighter List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_263 troop glider List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_264 troop glider List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_265 primary trainer List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_266 liaison List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_item_3_267

Captured List of aircraft of the United States during World War II_section_5


El Electra era un monoplano de ala baja cantilever de construcción enteramente metálica (nótese que algunos de los diseños de madera de Lockheed, tales como el Orion habían sido construidos en metal por la firma Detroit Aircraft Corporation), con tren de aterrizaje retráctil del tipo rueda de cola y unidad de cola bideriva. Estaba propulsado por dos motores Pratt & Whitney Wasp Junior SB. El nombre Electra proviene de una de las estrellas de la constelación de las Pléyades. El prototipo realizó su primer vuelo el 23 de febrero de 1934 [ 1 ] ​ y fue seguido por 148 ejemplares de serie.

Las pruebas aerodinámicas del Electra en el túnel de viento fueron realizados en la Universidad de Míchigan, en gran parte por el becario Clarence Johnson. Este estudiante sugirió realizar dos cambios en el diseño: reemplazar la deriva simple por otra doble (sistema posteriormente patentado por Lockheed) y retirar los sobredimensionados carenados de unión de las alas. Ambas sugerencias fueron incorporadas a la línea de producción. Tras recibir su titulación superior, Johnson entró a trabajar en Lockheed llegando a liderar los Skunk Works de desarrollo de aviones como el SR-71 Blackbird.

El Electra comenzó a operar en 1934, inicialmente con Northwest Airlines, y a finales de los años treinta servía ya en ocho compañías estadounidenses.

La aviadora Amelia Earhart desapareció sin dejar rastro junto a su navegante Fred Noonan en un Electra 10-E bastante modificado mientras intentaba dar la vuelta al mundo en 1937. [ 2 ] ​

Posteriormente en 1937, H.T. "Dick" Merrill y J.S. Lambie consiguieron realizar el considerado primer vuelo comercial de ida y vuelta sobre el Océano Atlántico, hecho premiado con el Harmon Trophy. En el viaje de ida llevaron noticias sobre el desastre del Hindenburg, y en el de vuelta, diferentes fotografías de la coronación del rey Jorge VI.

Cuando Estados Unidos entró de lleno en la II Guerra Mundial, pocos Electra seguían en las flotas de las empresas estadounidenses de transporte aéreo, pues la expansión del mercado había superado la escasa capacidad del modelo. Además de los aparatos construidos para las compañías domésticas, los Electra se exportaron a Argentina, Australia, Canadá, Chile, Colombia, Gran Bretaña, Japón, Nueva Zelanda, Polonia, Rumania, la URSS, Venezuela y Yugoslavia. Unos pocos ejemplares participaron en la Guerra Civil Española.

El gobierno de la República adquirió dos Lockheed L-10 Electra un ejemplar comprado en Estados Unidos fue embarcado en el buque "Mar Cantábrico" con destino al puerto republicano de Santander. Este buque fue capturado en alta mar por el crucero "Canarias" de la Marina Nacional y este avión quedó encuadrado en la Aviación Nacional, siendo codificado como 42-2. El otro Electra comprado en México fue utilizado por la Aviación de la República, en misiones de enlace, siendo recuperado al finalizar la guerra y matriculado 42-4. Ambos seguían en servicio el 1 de marzo de 1940, y uno de ellos el 1 de febrero de 1946 con el nuevo código de identificación L.10 siguió en vuelo hasta 1953.

Muchos de los Electra y sus variantes (L-12 Electra Junior y L-14 Super Electra) fueron utilizados en tareas militares durante la Segunda Guerra Mundial con la denominación C-36 de las USAAF. Además este modelo sirvió en la RAF británica y en las Reales Fuerzas Aéreas de Canadá. El empleo del Electra por parte de pequeñas compañías aéreas prosiguió después de la guerra y algunos se conservaban aún en servicio a principios de los años ochenta. [ 2 ] ​


The Woke-Industrial Complex

Last year, Lockheed Martin Corporation, the nation’s largest defense contractor, sent white male executives to a three-day diversity-training program aimed at deconstructing their “white male culture” and encouraging them to atone for their “white male privilege,” according to documents I have obtained.

The program, hosted on Zoom for a cohort of 13 Lockheed employees, was led by the diversity-consulting firm White Men As Full Diversity Partners, which specializes in helping white males “awaken together.” The Lockheed employees, all senior leaders in the company, included Aaron Huckaby, director of global supply chain operations retired Air Force lieutenant colonel David Starr, director of the Hercules C-130 military transport program retired Air Force lieutenant general Bruce Litchfield, vice president of sustainment operations and Glenn Woods, vice president of production for the Air Force’s $1.7 trillion F-35 fighter jet program. (Lockheed Martin did not return request for comment.)

At the beginning of the program, the diversity trainers led a “free association” exercise, asking the Lockheed employees to list connotations for the term “white men.” The trainers wrote down “old,” “racist,” “privileged,” “anti-women,” “angry,” “Aryan Nation,” “KKK,” “Founding fathers,” “guns,” “guilty,” and “can’t jump.” According to the participants, these perceptions have led to “assumptions about white men and diversity,” with many employees believing that white men “don’t care about diversity,” “have a classical perspective on history and colonialism,” and “don’t want to give away our power.”

The White Men As Full Diversity Partners team—Jim Morris, Mark Havens, and Michael Welp—framed the purpose of the training session as providing a benefit for white men who embrace the diversity and inclusion philosophy. In response to a prompt about “what’s in it for white men,” the participants listed benefits such as: “I won’t get replaced by someone who is a better full diversity partner,” “[I will] improve the brand, image, reputation of white men,” and “I [will] have less nagging sense of guilt that I am the problem.”

In a set of related resources, White Men As Full Diversity Partners lays out its theory of privilege. The firm’s founders, Welp and Bill Proudman, have argued that white males must “work hard to understand” their “white privilege,” “male privilege,” and “heterosexual privilege,” which affords them unearned benefits. The firm’s training programs are designed to assist white men in discovering the “roots of white male culture.” That culture, according to Welp and Proudman, consists of traits—such as “rugged individualism,” “a can-do attitude,” “hard work,” “operating from principles,” and “striving towards success”—which are superficially positive but are “devastating” to women and minorities.

At the Lockheed training, following the baseline exercises, the trainers proceeded with the “hearts and minds” portion of the session: deconstructing employees’ “white male privilege” through a series of “privilege statements,” then working to rebuild their identities as “agent[s] of change.” The trainers provided the participants with a list of 156 “white privilege statements,” “male privilege statements,” and “heterosexual privilege statements” to read and discuss, including: “My culture teaches me to minimize the perspectives and powers of people of other races” “I can commit acts of terrorism, violence or crime and not have it attributed to my race” “My earning potential is 15-33% higher than a woman’s” “My reproductive organs are not seen as the property of other men, the government, and/or even strangers because of my gender” “I am not asked to think about why I am straight” “I can have friendships with or work around children without being accused of recruiting or molesting them.”

Finally, in order to cement the idea that white male culture is “devastating” to racial minorities and women, the trainers had the Lockheed employees read a series of “I’m tired” statements from fictitious racial minorities and women. The statements included: “I’m tired of being Black” “I’m tired of you making more money than me” “I’m tired of people disparaging our campaigns (like Black Lives Matter)” “I’m tired of Black boys/girls being murdered” “I’m tired of people thinking they’re smarter and more qualified than me” “I’m tired of hearing about how we need a wall at the southern borders but not on the northern borders” “I’m tired of the desire or comment to remove race—the concept that we should be ‘colorblind.’”

This is not the first time White Men As Full Diversity Partners has been involved in a controversial training program. Last year, I reported on the company’s white male training program for employees at the Sandia National Laboratories, which began a series of reports leading to President Trump’s Executive Order 13950, banning racial stereotyping, scapegoating, and discrimination in federal diversity programs. The Trump ban, however, was temporary President Biden rescinded the order on his first day in office.

Today, it’s back to business as usual. Consultants such as White Men As Full Diversity Partners peddle fashionable racial theories and attach themselves to bloated government contractors such as Lockheed Martin. Presidents change, but for now the woke-industrial complex has no term limit.

Christopher F. Rufo is a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute and a contributing editor of City Journal. Sign up for his newsletter here.


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“On the trans-Atlantic run, TCA will carry 63 passengers in the big plane with the triple-pronged tail assembly,” Dobie reported. “Fifty-four tourist seats are available in the forward section and nine first-class in the aft cabin where the lounge is situated.

“TCS has built up a wine cellar in Montreal. For those who can afford it, choice wines and the ultimate in food will be served the first class passengers on the Atlantic run.”

Lufthansa sent out this promo picture in 1958 with the cutline “Plenty of legroom on a Lockheed Super Constellation.” Bildarchiv, FRA CI/C

The first-class section does look rather luxurious in some 1958 Super-Constellation promo photos put out by Lufthansa — there are only two seats on either side of a spacious aisle, and enough legroom to really stretch out. A 1954 TCA ad shows fully reclining “Siesta Seats” that you could book in the first-class lounge.


Lockheed Model 10 Electra — двухмоторный легкий транспортный и пассажирский самолёт. Всего было построено 149 самолетов. Сохранилось порядка 13 самолетов в различных музеях. летающих не встречал. Наш борт несет маркировку R20-1,хотя является просто L-10A. Но видимо для аутентичности в музее морской авиации был нужен самолет морского министра:-)))
XR20-1 обозначение одного самолета для штаба ВМС США, оснащенный двигателями Pratt & Whitney R-985-48 мощностью 450 л.с. Персональный самолет морского министра.

Naval museum, Pensacola Fl
Как всегда использую информацию с сайтов
http://www.airwar.ru
http://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki
и других источников найденных мною в инете и литературе.

Lockheed R2O-1(он же L10 A Electra) 1938 года выпуска cn 1130 N19HL(бывшие номера VH-MMD и VH-ABV).
в 1938 был построен как L-10A.
17 октября 1938 перевезен на корабле SS *Tolken* в Adelaide Австралия.
21 декабря 1938 получил гражданскую регистрацию: VH-ABV
31 октября 1948 новая регистрация: VH-MMD
7 февраля 1954 перегоночный полет. Прибыл в Perth.
1954 продан Phelan Aircraft Materials, CO.
25 февраля 1954 гражданская регистрация, VH-MMD,прекращена.
25 февраля 1954 перевезен на корабле SS *Sonomia* из Сиднея в США.
1954 продан Mountain Airlines/Jerome Eddy с c/r N4886V.
12 августа 1969 получил летную годность как N19HL (ELECTRA 10-A, 1130).
неизвестный собственник c/r N19HL.
19 августа 1999 гражданская регистрация, N19HL, прекращена.
новый владелец в NAS Pensacola, FL.
передан в National Naval Aviation Museum, Pensacola NAS, Pensacola, FL.
Несет маркировку: U.S.NAVY R2O-1 1130

В июне 1932-го конструкторское бюро компании Lockheed выяснило,что рынок толкает к созданию двухмоторных машин.
Все силы бросили на создание самолета под названием Model 10 или Electra. Работами руководил Х.Хиббэрд. Он избрал компоновку моноплана с нижним расположением крыла. Конструкция должна была полностью выполняться из легких сплавов. В качестве двигателей выбрали два Pratt & Whitney R-1340-S1H1 Wasp Junior по 550 л.с.
Лайнер рассчитывался на экипаж из двух человек и десять пассажиров. Пассажирский салон разделялся центральным проходом - пять кресел слева и пять - справа. Первоначально оперение сконструировали классическим однокилевым, а крыло снабдили большими зализами. Но продувка в аэродинамической трубе заставила отказаться и от того, и от другого. Новое двухкилевое оперение использовалось затем на многих последующих пассажирских самолетах Lockheed.

Зализы крыла на опытном образце Electra, построенном в феврале 1934 года, еще сохранялись, также как и козырек пилотской кабины с обратным наклоном (считалось, что он улучшает обзор на посадке). В феврале 1934 года М.Хэдл впервые поднял Model 10 в воздух с заводского аэродрома в Бэрбенке. В ходе испытаний выяснилось, что зализы, существенно увеличивая массу, почти не улучшили аэродинамику. И их сняли. Забраковали и козырек с обратным наклоном. На опытной машине его заменили новым, с плавным переходом от носовой части к верхней поверхности фюзеляжа. Но и он не удовлетворил: блики ухудшали обзор ночью и при плохой видимости. В конце концов пришли к вполне традиционному V-образному ветровому стеклу.
Весной 1934 года Electra прошла сертификационные испытания. При возвращении с них в Бэрбенк у самолета не выпустилась одна стойка шасси. Хэдл слил в воздухе большую часть горючего и приказал выбросить за борт балласт, имитировавший на испытаниях вес пассажиров и груза. После этого самолет благополучно приземлился на одно колесо на взлетную полосу. Поломки были невелики, фактически пришлось сменить только ось колеса. Машину быстро вновь ввели в строй. С августа разрешили эксплуатацию Electra на авиалиниях.

Первую серийную машину выпустили в августе 1934 года. Это был самолет модификации L-10A, в целом соответствовавший опытному образцу. Из-за того, что чертежи в производство передали еще до окончания доводки опытного самолета, первые пять лайнеров получили козырек кабины с обратным наклоном. Заказчиком всей первой партии являлась компания Northwest Airlines. Она так торопилась выпустить их на линии, что не стала ждать государственного сертификата. В августе 1934 года, за четыре дня до подписания этого документа, вторая серийная Electra разбилась! Northwest это вышло боком - ведь формально она не имела права выпускать L-10А на линию.
Тем не менее, на коммерческом успехе Electra это не сказалось. Заказов поступило много. Руководство Lockheed поняло, что решение сделать ставку на двухмоторную машину себя оправдало. Electra разных модификаций стали летать в цветах компаний Chicago and Southern, Continent, Delta, Eastern, Hanford, National Airways и Pan-American.
Большая часть самолетов (около двух третей) строилась в модификации L-10A. Их в общей сложности выпустили 101, не только для заказчиков в США, но и экспортировали в Венесуэлу и Чили. Не все они были одинаковы - по усмотрению покупателя машины комплектовались винтами различных типов, а при необходимости - пневматическими антиобледенителями. В придачу к стандартным бакам в центроплане можно было установить дополнительные в крыле или фюзеляже.

В значительно меньших количествах изготовлялись другие модификации. L-10В отличались двигателями Wright R-975-E3 Whirlwind (440 л.с.). Их строили с сентября 1935 по июль 1937 года, выпустив всего 18 штук. Основным владельцем машин этой модели стала компания Eastern airlines.
L-10C делались по заказу Pan-American. На складах компании залежались двигатели Wasp SC1 мощностью по 450 л.с. Lockheed предложили спроектировать вариант с этими двигателями для периферийных отделений Pan-American. Выпустили всего восемь таких самолетов. Первым из восьми машин стала четвертая серийная Electra, сданная заказчику в сентябре 1934 года.
L-10С летали в аляскинском отделении Pan-American и в дочерних компаниях Aerovis centrales и Cubana. Машины, эксплуатировавшиеся на Аляске, оснащались капотами двигателей с лобовыми управляемыми жалюзи и лыжным неубирающимся шасси.
После того, как у Pan-American кончился запас двигателей SC1, она для операций в Центральной Америке заказала партию самолетов L-10E с двигателями S3H1 в 600 л.с. Эта модификация также нашла спрос там, где требовались более высокие летные данные. Но построили их тоже немного -15 штук.

Electra имела свои плюсы. Хорошая аэродинамика позволяла ей при меньшей мощности двигателей достигать той же скорости, что и DC-3. Расход горючего у L-10A тоже был меньше. На тех линиях, где эксплуатация больших лайнеров себя не оправдывала, Electra нашла свое место.
Существовало и несколько военных модификаций L-10. Первой из них стала XR2O-1(вроде как наш борт?), в 1935 году заказанная американским ВМФ. Это был обычный пассажирский самолет с двигателями R-985-48. Изготовили только одну такую машину, сданную в феврале 1936 года. Она стала персональным самолетом морского министра. Месяцем позже флот получил второй самолет, XR3O-1. Он отличался двигателями модификации R-985-E3 (как L-10В) и возможностью быстрого конвертирования салона из пассажирского в санитарный.
Авиационный корпус армии тоже покупал Electra" у Lockheed. Самым интересным из армейских вариантов следует считать ХС-35 - летающую лабораторию для высотных полетов. Ее называли "субстратосферным самолетом". По заданию требовалось создать экспериментальную машину, оснащенную герметизированным фюзеляжем и турбонагнетателями на моторах. И то, и другое тогда являлось новинкой. Проект разрабатывался под руководством Ф.Смита.
Самолет получил совершенно новый фюзеляж круглого сечения. Заклепочные швы первоначально собирались герметизировать лентами ткани, вымоченными в клее, но испытания на образцах показали, что такое уплотнение недостаточно надежно. Выход нашли в применении нового синтетического материала фирмы "Дюпон".

Еще армия купила три обычных L-10А с моторами R-985-13, обозначенные военными Y1C-36. Один из них разбили в феврале 1938 года, а два других служили до начала Второй мировой войны. Почти идентичен им был единственный Y1С-37 для национальной гвардии.
В июле 1936 года специальный L-10E изготовили для знаменитой летчицы Амелии Эрхарт. Он имел дополнительные фюзеляжные бензобаки, увеличивавшие запас топлива вшестеро против стандартного, и радиополукомпас. Большую часть окон в пассажирском салоне за ненадобностью зашили металлом.
Electra непрерывно строились до февраля 1940 года, параллельно с более поздними самолетами L-14 Super Electra и L-18 Loadstar. Затем последовал перерыв в заказах до января 1941 года, когда производство возобновили, изготовив еще десять машин. Последнюю Electra сдали "LAN-Чили" 18 июля 1941 года, построив всего 148 самолетов.

Когда началась Вторая мировая война, многие L-10 попали в военно-транспортную авиацию. В США реквизировали 15 L-10A, получивших в ВВС обозначение С-36А, пять L-10E (С-36В) и семь L-10B (С-36С). В январе 1943 года их переименовали соответственно в UC-36A, UC-36B и UC-36C. Они эксплуатировались только в тылу, на территории США. С 1944 года те машины, которые еще могли летать, стали возвращать в гражданскую авиацию. Два старых Y1C-36 передали по программе военной помощи в Бразилию.
Мобилизовали и часть машин British Airways. Самый первый самолет реквизировали в день объявления войны Германии, 3 сентября 1939 года, еще три - в апреле 1940 года. Все они служили в 24-й эскадрилье в Англии. Последний из них списали в июле 1942 года. Еще четыре-пять Electra (в том числе один L-10B) вошли в Королевские ВВС в 1940 году. Они работали на Ближнем Востоке и в Африке, а один самолет летал в Индии до июля 1946 года.
В канадские ВВС вошли 12 L-10A и три L-10B. Там они применялись не только как транспортные, но и как учебные. У бразильской армии в итоге оказались, кроме двух Y1С-36, четыре L-10А и один L-10B. Один L-10A под конец своей жизни попал в крошечные ВВС Гондураса.

После войны довольно много Electra числилось в гражданской авиации Бразилии, Эквадора, Коста-Рики и других стран Центральной и Южной Америки. Там они дожили до 1970 годов. Немало машин летало до этого времени и в других государствах. В середине 1960 годов в США имелось девять пригодных к полетам самолетов, шесть - в Канаде и один - в Австралии. В Штатах последняя машина этого типа закончила свою карьеру приводнением в Массачусетской бухте в августе 1967 года. Это был бывший XR3O-1. На 32 году жизни заслуженный ветеран все еще продолжал летать в цветах небольшой компании Provincetown-Boston Airlines.

Electra не обошли стороной и нашу страну. Всего в нашу страну различными путями попало 4 или 5 подобных самолетов.

Модификации :
Electra 10-А основной серийный вариант с двигателями Pratt & Whitney Wasp Junior SB построен 101 самолет.
Electra 10-В аналог модели Electra 10-А, но оснащенный двигателями Wright R-975-E3 Whirlwind мощностью 440 л.с.
Electra 10-С вариант для компании Пан Америкэн Эйруэйз, оснащенный двигателями Wasp SC1 мощностью 450 л.с. построено 8 самолетов.
Electra 10-D планировавшийся военный вариант не был построен.
Electra 10-Е аналог модели Electra 10-А, но оснащенный двигателями Wasp S3H1 мощностью 600 л.с. построено 15 самолетов наиболее известным из них был NR16020, на котором во время попытки совершения кругосветного полета 2 июля 1937 года пропали без вести Амелия Ирхарт и штурман Фрэд Нунан.
XR20-1 обозначение одного самолета для штаба ВМС США, оснащенный двигателями Pratt & Whitney R-985-48 мощностью 450 л.с.
XR30-1 обозначение одного санитарно-транспортного самолета для Береговой охраны США, оснащенного двигателями Wright R-975-E3 мощностью 440 л.с.
XC-35 вариант стандартной модели Электра с герметичной кабиной, оснащенный двигателями с турбонагнетателем Pratt & Whitney XR-1340-43 мощностью 550 л.с. использовался для изучения герметизации и использования двигателей с турбонагнетателем.
Y1C-36 вариант Electra 10-А, оснащенный двигателями Pratt & Whitney R-985-13 мощностью 450 л.с. использовался в качестве транспортного самолета.
С-36А (позднее UC-36A) обозначение 15 самолетов Electra10-А, реквизированных для военной службы в ВВС США (USAAF) во время Второй мировой войны.
С-36В (позднее UC-36B) обозначение пяти самолетов Electra 10-Е, реквизированных для службы в ВВС США.
С-36C (позднее UC-36C) обозначение семи самолетов Electra 10-В, реквизированных для службы в ВВС США.
Y1C-37 обозначение самолета, в целом похожего на модель Y1C-36.

ЛТХ:
Модификация Model 10-A
Размах крыла, м 16.76
Длина, м 11.76
Высота, м 3.07
Площадь крыла, м2 42.58
Масса, кг
пустого самолета 3221
нормальная взлетная 4763
Тип двигателя 2 ПД Pratt Whitney R-985-13 Wasp Junior
Мощность, л.с. 2 х 450
Максимальная скорость , км/ч 323
Крейсерская скорость , км/ч 312
Практическая дальность, км 1072
Максимальная скороподъемность, м/мин
Практический потолок, м 7315
Экипаж 3
Полезная нагрузка: до 10 пассажиров
Вооружение: 2 12.7-мм пулемета.
Иногда до 907 кг легких бомб


Lockheed-Backed Reps Lobby Against F-35 Spending Cuts

The F-35 joint strike fighter, the most expensive weapons program in history, is finally facing tough questions about its future after chronic delays and cost overruns. But over 150 members of Congress are arguing that the dysfunctional aircraft must keep its high level of funding next year, lest the U.S.—which spends more on its military than the next ten countries combined—fall behind in air superiority to “adversaries like China and Russia.”

On April 28, a bipartisan group of 132 House members put out a letter calling on Congress to continue with F-35 production, procurement, and “robust investment,” citing concerns that any spending reduction would lead to a “capability gap that legacy aircraft or new variants thereof cannot fulfill.”

The letter was led by the four co-chairs of the Joint Strike Fighter Caucus: Reps. John Larson (D-Conn.), Marc Veasey (D-Tex.), Michael Turner (R-Ohio), and Chris Stewart (R-Utah). A group of twenty bipartisan senators followed-up with their own pro-F-35 letter released on May 5.

The cost of the F-35 program has nearly doubled to well over $428 billion since its initial estimate of $233 billion in 2001. Annual defense bills by Congress have pushed tens of billions of dollars into the troubled program even as it suffers from a host of technical maladies, bringing the 50-year operating cost of the F-35 to a gigantic $1.727 trillion of public money authorized. Last year, Congress’ defense budget funded 17 more of the planes than the Pentagon requested.

This year, progressives in Congress are renewing calls for President Biden to significantly reduce the military budget, as they called for last summer during the coronavirus pandemic under President Trump.

Even some hawkish Democratic members of Congress with jurisdiction over the Pentagon budget have joined in advocating for reduced spending on the F-35, which in recent months has seen its official support within the Pentagon begin to wane. The powerful House Armed Services Committee Chair Adam Smith (D-Wash.) criticized the jet’s runaway costs, saying, “I want to stop throwing money down that particular rathole” and suggesting the Pentagon find a way to “cut our losses.” Two Democratic subcommittee chairs said last week that they’re wary of adding any more F-35s than the Pentagon requests to the FY2022 defense budget, which is still being developed as part of Biden’s federal budget proposal. The F-35 is one of a handful of projects mentioned in a Feb. 17 memo by Deputy Defense Secretary Kathleen Hicks as being under Pentagon review for potential cuts in acquisitions.

The House letter to the chairs and ranking members of the House Armed Services Committee and the House Defense Appropriations Subcommittee claims, “The F-35 is the only fighter in production that can produce aircraft in the numbers required to recapture our aging fighter force.” It reads, “The F-35 is a great deterrent for the near peer threats of China and Russia and as such, we urge the committees to support readiness (sustainment), rate (production ramp) and relevance (modernization) for both the airframe (F-35) and the propulsion system (F135).”

The Joint Strike Fighter Caucus is composed of 27 representatives—seven Democrats and 20 Republicans—who led a similar letter last year calling for continued spending on the F-35 program. The caucus was founded in 2011 to prevent F-35 budget cuts by Rep. Kay Granger (R-Tex.), who was the House’s top recipient of cash from Lockheed Martin’s PAC and employees last cycle at nearly $198,000, and then-Rep. Norm Dicks (D-Wash.), whose top career contributors were mostly military contractors, including Lockheed Martin.

Lockheed Martin, the largest defense contractor in the world, is the prime contractor on the F-35 Lightning II program, which Pentagon watchdogs have tracked has been riddled with structural deficiencies and cybersecurity vulnerabilities. Last year, Lockheed received $72.3 billion from the Department of Defense according to Bloomberg Government, and the company gets around 70% of its revenue from the federal government, making it one of the “pure-play” military contractors. The Pentagon’s former chief weapons buyer, Frank Kendall, told 60 Minutes in a 2014 interview that the faulty F-35 represented “acquisition malpractice.”

Earlier this year, Dan Grazier, a military analyst with the nonpartisan Project On Government Oversight (POGO), told me about Lockheed’s strategies to keep the F-35’s budget sacrosanct. “All the defense contractors use campaign donations to increase their influence on Capitol Hill. Even more important than that, they also spread contracts and subcontracts all over the country,” Grazier said. “The economic impact and the appearance of jobs created among their constituents tends to make members of Congress vocal advocates for particular programs.”

Lockheed’s PAC donated to 25 of the Joint Strike Fighter Caucus members in the 2020 election cycle, not all of whom signed the letter, averaging $7,120, according to Sludge’s review of data from the Center for Responsive Politics (CRP). Eleven of the reps received the per-cycle $10,000 maximum from Lockheed’s PAC, and combined with employee donations, entities affiliated with Lockheed gave over $426,000 to caucus members last cycle. By comparison, to 324 other reps who received PAC contributions from Lockheed, the company’s PAC and employees gave an average of $5,140.

/>Rep. Michael Turner (R-Ohio) speaks during a House Intelligence Committee hearing on Capitol Hill, April 15, 2021. (Al Drago/Pool via AP)

Caucus co-chair Turner was the third-highest House recipient of contributions from Lockheed’s PAC and employees at $64,350, according to CRP. Each of the F-35 letter’s three other organizers—Larson, Veasy, and Stewart—received the per-cycle maximum of $10,000 from Lockheed’s PAC in the 2020 cycle.

Lockheed has been the second-highest career donor to Turner, who represents Ohio’s Tenth Congressional District encompassing much of Dayton, at over $162,000. The defense aerospace industry has been Turner’s third-largest career backer with over $504,000 contributed, according to CRP. For his GOP colleague Stewart, defense contractors have also been top campaign contributors, with Lockheed’s PAC giving a total of $40,000.

Over his career, twelve-term Democratic Rep. Larson has received over $584,000 in contributions from the defense industry, making it his sixth-highest industry donor according to CRP. Weapons contractor Raytheon, which manufactures sensor systems for the F-35, is Larson’s top career donor, with $407,225 given. Lockheed’s PAC and employees have contributed a total of $92,700 to Larson’s campaigns.

Among the letter’s 132 signers are representatives who hold, or recently held, personal investments in Lockheed Martin stock while they advocate for billions of dollars in continued spending on its weapons systems. In the 2019 financial disclosure report for Rep. Kevin Hern (R-Okla.), he discloses holding up to $15,000 in Lockheed through a joint trust called the Hern Family Foundation. On July 27, 2020, he reported purchasing an investment in Lockheed in an amount between $1,000 and $15,000, described as a subholding of Kevin Hern Insurance Trust.

Letter signer Rep. Daniel Meuser (R-Penn.) holds up to $15,000 in Lockheed stock, according to his annual financial disclosure for 2019 with the office of the House clerk.

Rep. Joe Courtney (D-Conn.), another signer, reported that his spouse bought up to $15,000 worth of Lockheed Martin stock on Dec. 31, 2019, and sold up to the same amount of Lockheed stock on Aug. 7, 2020. Courtney had also signed last year’s letter calling for continued F-35 spending while his spouse likely held shares of Lockheed.

Last July, the House and Senate considered an amendment brought by Progressive Caucus leaders Reps. Mark Pocan (D-Wisc.), Barbara Lee (D-Calif.), and Pramila Jayapal (D-Wash.), as well as Sens. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), Ed Markey (D-Mass.), and Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), that would have cut the Pentagon’s budget by 10% to reallocate funding to healthcare, education, and other needs.

While the amendment did not succeed in either chamber, Pentagon watchdogs described it as the first time in years that cuts to the bloated military budget were the subject of a full House vote. A 2018 POGO report on the Pentagon’s revolving door found that Lockheed, like other top weapons contractors, hires dozens of former senior government officials as lobbyists or company directors to secure Department of Defense contracts.

Progressive advocacy group Win Without War is tracking the members of Congress who publicly support this year’s proposed reduction in the Pentagon budget, and those who supported last year’s amendment to prioritize shifting some $74 billion to pandemic response.

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See the full list of F-35 letter signers here, starting on page three:


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