History Podcasts

Andrew Wyeth

Andrew Wyeth

Andrew Newell Wyeth is an American realist painter, one of the most famous of the 20th century. Owing to his popularity with the American public, he has been called the "Painter of the People." His most-noted work, one of the best-known images in 20th-century American art, is "Christina's World" (1948), in New York City's Museum of Modern Art.Childhood and educationAndrew Wyeth is the son of Newell Convers Wyeth, a famous American illustrator and artist. Wyeth’s career was launched when the entire inventory of paintings sold quickly.Marriage and early careerIn 1940, Wyeth married Betsy Merle James, whom he had met the year before in Maine. Betsy introduced Wyeth to Christina Olson, who became the subject of "Christina's World." Christina, her brother Alvaro, and their weatherbeaten house became an important subject of Wyeth's art.In 1945, Wyeth's father and his three-year-old nephew were killed near their home, when his car stalled on railroad tracks and was struck by a train. Wyeth has often referred to his father's death as a formative emotional event in his artistic career.Shortly following the tragedy, Wyeth's art consolidated into his mature and enduring style, characterized by a subdued color palette, highly realistic renderings, and the depiction of emotionally charged symbolic objects.A mature style and growing fameIn 1948, Wyeth began to paint Anna and Karl Kuerner, along with their farm. They were the Wyeths' neighbors in Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania, and became important subjects for nearly 30 years.Dividing his time between Pennsylvania and Maine, Wyeth has maintained a fairly consistent, realist painting style for more than 50 years. His works have become increasingly higher-priced with his growing fame, and today Wyeth's major works can sell for more than $1 million from private dealers and at auction. Museum exhibitions of Wyeth's work have set attendence records. Most people who view Wyeth's art agree that he is exceptionally skilled at handling the media of watercolor and egg tempera.Wyeth’s career was marked by controversy with a number of works he painted of the model Helga Testorf. Wyeth began to paint images of her in 1971, and continued for nearly 15 years without his wife's knowledge. The paintings were sold to an anonoymous Japanese industrialist in 1990 and were resold, in December 2005, to an American buyer.HonorsAndrew Wyeth's works can be viewed in most major American museum collections. In 1963, Wyeth became the first painter to receive the Presidential Medal of Freedom, which was conferred by President John F. Kennedy.In 1977, Wyeth was elected to the Académie des Beaux-Arts, the first American artist since John Singer Sargent. He also was the first living American artist to be elected to Britain's Royal Academy, in 1980. In 1990, he was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal of Honor by President George H.W. Bush.


See also Edward Hopper.


Andrew Wyeth - History

In his art, Wyeth's favorite subjects were the land and people around him, both in his hometown of Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania, and at his summer home in Cushing, Maine.


"Witching Hour" by Andrew Wyeth

editions by Brilliant Graphics

NEW. Open Edition Pigment Prints
A new edition of fine art archival pigment prints of Andrew Wyeth&rsquos original paintings

Limited Edition - archival ink prints
Large format works printed using eight color archival inks on
fine German etching paper and limited to an edition of 500 each

These unsigned editions are numbered, approved, and controlled by the Wyeth family.
$900.00 Each unframed, plus s/h (6% FL sales tax where applicable).

Slight Breeze 24 1/2" x 32 1/2"

Signed limited editions by Andrew Wyeth are very highly valued by collectors and are obviously becoming very rare. There have been many types of limited editions created over the years via the Collotype process, 4-color lithography, and the more modern Iris and pigmented ink process. We have a large selection of "out of print" and currently available signed editions by Andrew Wyeth. Some of the current signed limited Giclée editions and 4-color lithography editions are listed below. If there are other/earlier signed editions that you are looking for please contact us for more information on what's available.


"The Carry" - signed and numbered
limited pigmented ink (Giclée) edition of 300
20.5 by 42 inches $8,500.00 unframed

"Monday Morning" - signed and numbered
limited pigmented ink (Giclée) edition of 300
12.25 by 17 inches Call for availability

"Snow Hill" - signed and numbered
limited pigmented ink (Giclée) artist copy edition of 20
26.5 by 40 inches $10,000 unframed

"Pentecost" - signed and numbered
limited pigmented ink (Giclée) edition
30.75 by 20.75 inches Call for availability


"Jupiter" - signed offset lithograph limited edition of 300
34 by 34 inches Call for availability

To order these very limited editions please contact us or fill out our Special Order Form.


Master Bedroom
see new editions above
Christina's World
see new editions above

Andrew Wyeth Artworks

Wyeth presents the viewer with a dead crow, stiffened from rigor mortis and frozen in the wintery landscape. The viewer doesn't look down on the crow but instead sees it as if his or her face were pressed to the ground, not far from the creature. The fields surrounding Wyeth's neighbor's house extend well into the distance, and a farm house and trees dot the horizon. The perspectival effect accords the small animal an outsized prominence to its setting, thus suggesting the gravity and importance of its death.

Having come across the dead bird during a walk, Wyeth brought the crow back to his studio to study and paint it, so multiple sketches for this painting exist. Wyeth remembered, "This crow in one of Karl's fields symbolized the nature and intimacy of the Pennsylvania landscape. The blue-black of the feathers helped me break free of 'Impressionism.'" The exquisite details that Wyeth was able to capture with tempera paint, an unusual choice of medium in modern times, underscore the degree to which Wyeth broke from the then contemporary trends of abstraction.

Painted in the midst of World War II, some have drawn parallels between the painting and the photographs of the dead and wounded in the battlefields of Europe. Additionally, Wyeth was fascinated with American movies, particularly early, silent war films made after World War I and was inspired by the filmic framing of battle scenes. Wyeth, though, insisted his work had nothing to do with photography, and upon closer inspection one sees that the objects in the farthest background are painted as delicately and intricately as the crow. In doing so, Wyeth creates a depiction of space that neither humans or cameras could capture. From an early date, Wyeth's realism always aimed to capture, in his words "what lurks close down at the surface."

Tempera on composition board - Whitney Museum of American Art, New York

Winter 1946

In Winter 1946, we see a young man running fast and recklessly down a hill. The muted colors evoke a cold winter scene, with a sliver of unmelted snow in the upper left of the composition. Bundled in warm clothing, the viewer is left wondering who this boy is and his destination.

Wyeth created this painting after the horrific death of his father N.C. It was on Kuerner's Hill in Chadds Ford that his father was hit by a passing train. The engine stalled in N.C.'s car, and he and his young grandson were not able to move nor get the conductor to stop in time. His neighbor Karl Kuerner became a surrogate father figure to the artist, and the farm and the hill became a major source of inspiration for Wyeth's paintings over the next thirty years.

Given the biographical context, one can now imagine the young man as Wyeth himself, running aimlessly and distractedly while trying to make sense of his father's death. Wyeth later said he lamented the fact that he was never able to paint a portrait of his father but that "the hill finally became a portrait of him."

Tempera on board - North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, NC

Christina's World

With her back to the viewer, Wyeth's subject Anna Christina Olson stares into the distance, looking out at her farmhouse in Cushing, Maine. Suffering from a degenerative muscular disease, Christina was unable to walk. Wyeth said that she was "limited physically but by no means spiritually" and that "the challenge was to do justice to her extraordinary conquest of a life which most people would consider hopeless." Her gaunt arms and legs and her slight frame make the figure seem vulnerable and isolated in the expansive field, and the viewer is put in an ambiguous position, looking at her from behind. The scene contains a sense of vulnerability, contributing to a certain forboding feeling.

To say this is a true portrait of Christina Olson, though, would be misleading. While the pink dress and slim limbs belong to the then 55-year-old Olson, Wyeth used his young wife Betsy as the actual model here, thus fusing Christina's aging and abnormal body with that of a healthy, young one. Even though Wyeth wanted to depict Olson's plight, it can be interpreted that Wyeth made the subject an "Everywoman".

Christina's World presents an intriguing, open-ended narrative that appeals to the imagination. Who is Christina? Why is she in a field? Is that her house? Why does she seem to be crawling? While a seemingly straightforward painting, Christina's World is, in fact, characteristic of Wyeth's version of Magic Realism, which is not fantastical or overtly surrealistic but more subtle and unsettling in its hyper-realism. As one curator explained, Wyeth's paintings "are filled with hidden metaphors that explore common themes of memory, nostalgia and loss." And the artist himself said, "Magic! It's what makes things sublime. It's the difference between a picture that is profound art and just a painting of an object."

The profundity that Wyeth was able to capture in this painting makes it one of the most well-known and admired pieces that Wyeth ever produced however, it was not his personal favorite. Wyeth felt that the painting would have been more successful without the figure in the field. He remarked to an interviewer, "When I was painting Christina's World I would sit there by the hours working on the grass, and I began to feel I was really out in the field. I got lost in the texture of the thing. I remember going down into the field and grabbing up a section of earth and setting it on the base of my easel. It wasn't a painting I was working on. I was actually working on the ground itself."

Tempera on panel - Museum of Modern Art, New York

Trodden Weed

In this unusual composition, Wyeth painted a person walking across an autumnal hill, but we only see the person from the knees down, wearing old, sturdy, brown boots and the hem of his coat blowing in the breeze. As is typical for Wyeth, the grass and the weeds that comprise the field are rendered with the utmost detail and clarity with his dry brush technique. He often metaphorically described tempera paint as being like the earth, and he was deeply impressed by Albrecht Dürer's studies of nature and particularly tufts of grass. The horizon line is unusually high, and we see only a sliver of well-lit sky in the upper right corner.

The main focal point of the painting - the brown boots - show much wear, suggesting a long history. The boots originally belonged to Howard Pyle, the former art teacher of Wyeth's father. Betsy acquired the boots from another of Pyle's students and gave them to her husband as a Christmas gift in 1950. At the time, Wyeth was recovering from a major operation in which he had part of a lung removed. He found that the shoes fit and wore them to walk around the fields of Kuerner's farm as he recuperated from the surgery. Wearing the former teacher's shoes must have also reminded him of his childhood when he would dress up in historical costumes his father kept in his studio. Some critics have found the overt autobiographical symbolism of the painting overworked and clichéd, but the composition is still striking.

Tempera on board - Private Collection

Master Bedroom

In Master Bedroom, Wyeth presents the family dog, Rattler, asleep, curled up and snuggled into the pillows of a four poster bed. Wyeth's granddaughter, Victoria, said in an interview that the artist had "come home tired one evening, wanting to take a nap, only to find Rattler had got there first." She went on to quote Wyeth, "You know, dogs are the damnedest thing. They just take over the house." While the title suggests we are in the bedroom of the home's owner, it is also a sly nod to the real master of the house - the dog.

Wyeth perfectly captures the mundane nature of the scene. The simple white bedspread, seemingly worn in a few spots, covers the bed and pillows. The room is unadorned no pictures hang on the walls, but a small bowl sits on the window sill. The walls, painted rather gesturally, suggest old, discolored plaster. Through the window, we see a side of the house and a few branches of a tree. The light - a low, afternoon light - shines through window onto the end of the bed, not disturbing the sleeping dog.

Evidently, Wyeth's wife did not think much of the picture and suggested he put it on the "giveaway pile." Betsy would be surprised to learn that Master Bedroom became one of Wyeth's most popular paintings.

Watercolor on paper - Private Collection

Barracoon

In this controversial painting, Barracoon, a nude black woman reclines on a bed covered in white linens with her back turned toward the viewer. Her arms, bent at the elbows, rest in front of her, and her hands lie above her head. The subject is Wyeth's take on the traditional odalisque. As painted by Titian or Manet, the nude female becomes an object of sexual desire. One also thinks of Paul Gauguin's paintings of young, dark-skinned Tahitian women lying on divans in exoticized poses. While Wyeth's composition also carries a sexualized tension, instead of a lush, exotic setting, Wyeth placed the figure in a non-descript bedroom, not unlike the one in Master Bedroom, and painted the walls in gestural strokes and scratched its surface, leaving a mostly abstract background. In some ways this abstract setting, because there are no other distractions, intensifies one's voyeuristic gaze on the nude female body.

The title of the painting refers to an enclosed, locked space where slaves and criminals were held. The reference to slavery coupled with the tradition of the odalisque creates an ambiguous - and fraught - mood and calls into question the artist's intentions. Further complicating the issue is that Wyeth's subject was not the family's long-serving maid Betty Hammond, as he claimed for many years, but Helga Testorf, the white German woman he painted secretly for several years. Helga posed for the painting, but he changed her hair and darkened her skin to hide her identity from his wife, to whom he gave the painting as a birthday present.

Wyeth produced several paintings of African American subjects with whom he had developed friendships over the years, and while it is undeniable that Wyeth had a yearning to know and understand his models in an honest and compassionate way, these paintings are not without controversy, as they bring to the fore the power imbalance between a white artist and a black sitter with the legacy of America's racial history. The contemporary artist Hank Willis Thomas suggested that Wyeth "exploited, but not maliciously, as part of his brand.. It's not about him being a bad guy. But it's the question for any artist: When are you not exploiting someone?"

Overflow

In Overflow, the model Helga Testorf lies on her side, partially covered with a thin, white sheet, revealing her breasts and the top of her pubic area. Her braided pigtails fall over her breast and left arm while her right arm lies across her head and comes to rest on the pillow above her. Her eyes closed, she appears to be almost smiling, a rare occurrence in the Helga paintings. The evening moonlight gently falls on her body from behind, and warm summer air seems to come through the open window. The voyeuristic perspective suggests the passionate gaze of the artist. The title may refer to the overflow of light on the model or the artist's lustful desires to be with her.

Ever since their debut in 1987, the Helga paintings have sparked much speculation about the nature of Wyeth's relationship with his model. Wyeth always brushed aside rumors of an affair, but he said of these paintings, "The difference between me and a lot of painters is that I have to have a personal contact with my models. I don't mean a sexual love, I mean real love. Many artists tell me they don't even recall the names of their models. I have to fall in love with mine - hell, I do much the same with a tree or a dog. I have to become enamored. Smitten. That's what happened when I saw Helga walking up the Kuerner's lane. She was this amazing, crushing blonde." For her part, Helga simply explained that "the nude is the most holy thing. If you can get next to it, it is a divine spirit. It's soul. He paints the soul." Whatever the exact nature of their relationship, the two certainly held each other in great esteem.


Biography of Andrew Wyeth

Andrew Newell Wyeth was born on July 12, 1917, in rural Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania. He was the youngest son of Caroline Borkius Wyeth and the renowned artist and illustrator N.C. Wyeth. Continuing in the creative footsteps of their father, four of the five Wyeth children became artists. As a young child, Wyeth was prone to illness, and he contracted whooping cough. Concerned for his fragile health, his parents decided to school him at home. When Wyeth was three, the family began spending summers in Maine, where they enjoyed nature and relished the intellectual and social stimulation of their visiting guests. Exhibiting artistic promise at an early age, Andrew learned to draw before he could read, and eventually he assisted in creating his father's illustrations.


Wyeth

Through unprecedented access to Wyeth’s family members, including sons Jamie and Nicholas Wyeth, and never-before-seen archival materials from the family’s personal collection and hundreds of Wyeth’s studies, drawings and paintings, American Masters presents the most complete portrait of the artist yet — bearing witness to a legacy just at the moment it is evolving.

Wyeth tells the story of one of America’s most popular, but least understood, artists – Andrew Wyeth. Son of the famous illustrator N.C. Wyeth, Andrew had his first exhibition at age 20, and his painting “Christina’s World” was acquired by the Museum of Modern Art in 1948. While Wyeth’s exhibitions routinely broke attendance records, art world critics continually assaulted his work. Detailing the stunning drawings and powerful portraits he created in Chadds Ford, Pa., and on the coast of Cushing, Maine, Wyeth explores his inspirations, including neighbor Christina Olsen and his hidden muse, the German model Helga Testorf, who he painted secretly for 15 years. Through unprecedented access to Wyeth’s family members, including sons Jamie and Nicholas Wyeth, and never-before-seen archival materials from the family’s personal collection and hundreds of Wyeth’s studies, drawings and paintings, American Masters presents the most complete portrait of the artist yet — bearing witness to a legacy just at the moment it is evolving.

“Christina’s World,” 1948 tempera by Andrew Wyeth. © Andrew Wyeth/Artists Rights Society (ARS). Museum of Modern Art, New York

Wyeth is a production of glennfilms and FreshFly in association with THIRTEEN’s American Masters. Glenn Holsten is director. Chayne Gregg is producer. Funding is provided by Joanna McNeil Trust, the Wyncote Foundation, Michael & Helen Schaffer Foundation, the Haverford Trust Company, and The Leslie and Roslyn Goldstein Foundation.

About American Masters
Launched in 1986 on PBS, American Masters has earned 28 Emmy Awards — including 10 for Outstanding Non-Fiction Series and five for Outstanding Non-Fiction Special — 14 Peabodys, an Oscar, three Grammys, two Producers Guild Awards, and many other honors. To further explore the lives and works of masters past and present, American Masters offers streaming video of select films, outtakes, filmmaker interviews, the American Masters Podcast, educational resources and more. The series is a production of THIRTEEN PRODUCTIONS LLC for WNET and also seen on the WORLD channel. The series is available for streaming simultaneously on all station-branded PBS platforms, including PBS.org and the PBS Video app, which is available on iOS, Android, Roku, Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV and Chromecast. PBS station members can view episodes via Passport (contact your local PBS station for details).

About WNET
WNET is America’s flagship PBS station: parent company of New York’s THIRTEEN and WLIW21 and operator of NJTV, the statewide public media network in New Jersey. Through its new ALL ARTS multi-platform initiative, its broadcast channels, three cable services (THIRTEEN PBSKids, Create and World) and online streaming sites, WNET brings quality arts, education and public affairs programming to more than five million viewers each month. WNET produces and presents a wide range of acclaimed PBS series, including NATURE, GREAT PERFORMANCES, AMERICAN MASTERS, PBS NEWSHOUR WEEKEND, and the nightly interview program AMANPOUR AND COMPANY. In addition, WNET produces numerous documentaries, children’s programs, and local news and cultural offerings, as well as multi-platform initiatives addressing poverty and climate. Through THIRTEEN Passport and WLIW Passport, station members can stream new and archival THIRTEEN, WLIW and PBS programming anytime, anywhere.

Support for American Masters is provided by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, AARP, Rosalind P. Walter, Judith & Burton Resnick, The Cheryl & Philip Milstein family, Vital Projects Fund, Lillian Goldman Programming Endowment, The Blanche & Irving Laurie Foundation, Seton J. Melvin, Philip & Janice Levin Foundation, Ellen & James S. Marcus, The André and Elizabeth Kertész Foundation, The Ambrose Monell Foundation and public television viewers.

♪♪ ♪♪ -He paints the soul, not just an image.

-That was what was amazing about my father.

He saw things that other people just wouldn't see.

[ Creaks ] -He had almost a painful sensitivity.

-The abstraction in his pictures.

The fantastic compositional sense.

And the toughness in them.

[ Pencil scratching ] In some ways the sadness, the meditations on death and nature. [ Thunder rumbles ] . they're so 20th century.

-There's a darkness to Andrew Wyeth's work.

-If you really look at his work, it's pretty scary stuff.

It's kind of like a Robert Frost poem.

You could say it's some horse in the woods with a sleigh and the snow, but really read it, it's a hell of a lot more than that.

-Make the hair on the back of your neck stand up.

And you realize that something more is going on in the world.

♪♪ [ Bird caws ] ♪♪ [ Bird caws ] ♪♪ -Andrew Wyeth is one of the most highly regarded of American painters, if not most.

-Andrew Wyeth, leading American artist, is honored at the White House.

-This is the Whitney Museum in New York.

Normal daily attendance of art lovers, 500.

For a recent Wyeth exhibit, the average was 5,000 a day.

Attendance records were broken in Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Chicago, too.

-In the '60s, Andrew Wyeth was the very top artist.

He was the artist people talked about.

-There is something in Wyeth that appeals to the uninitiated and the connoisseur alike.

He has a mass audience that may be greater than any other living artist ever had.

-In a way, his popular following was a curse.

-He had a huge audience, he had many collectors, and he was criticized for that.

He has committed the final sins against the art establishment.

People like his work, and he's making money now instead of 400 years after his death.

-There were lines around the block at the Whitney, but that was also the kiss of death.

♪♪ -I first met the Wyeths in the early '70s.

I came out to Chadds Ford to meet Betsy and Andrew Wyeth, and found both of them very interesting people.

I think I somehow thought Andrew Wyeth would be more of a bumpkin, or a hermit or a farmer type, but what I found was somebody who served me the strongest cocktail I'd had in a long time, who made me laugh, and I found his wife beautiful, but also very clearly, I was going to have to win her approval, because she wanted only the best for Andrew Wyeth.

But I also came away thinking this is a much more complicated and interesting artist than I think I know from what's been written about him in the past.

♪♪ -One thing that stands out about Andrew Wyeth's work in contrast to the work of most of his contemporaries is that he grew up and lived in two places and two places alone during a long and productive life as an artist -- Chadds Ford. [ Bell clangs ] . Port Clyde and Cushing.

The places that define his life were these two rural communities.

New York was the center of the art world.

-Painting to me is a matter of truth and. maybe of memory.

♪♪ -He had an extraordinary childhood.

Most artists struggle to find themselves as artists.

Wyeth was raised from childhood to be an artist -- Protected, cultivated.

I think of him like an Olympic athlete.

N.C. Wyeth, his dad, developed him, trained him, encouraged him.

-He taught me everyday living, seeing things around me.

Seeing the imagination of what you can make out of nothing.

-N.C. Wyeth was a famous classic illustrator.

He painted big, bold illustrations.

Scribner's Books was one of his major clients.

He churned out all the classics -- 'Robinson Crusoe,' 'The Boy's King Arthur.'

-He and his wife ended up having a family of five children.

There were three girls and two boys.

It was a very creative family.

Henriette, Carolyn, and Andrew would become painters, Nat, a chemical engineer, and Ann, a composer.

-N.C. Wyeth thought that creative adults retained the spirit of childhood.

-N.C. had an ability to transform ordinary occurrences into bigger and better drama than they might have held themselves.

-The Christmases that he created for his children.

He would dress as Santa Claus.

It wasn't the traditional St. Nick that we know.

And he had a rather grotesque mask.

-Old Kris, as we called him, was to me a terrifying man.

And I remember when I was about 8 years old lying in bed and we heard stamping feet on the top of the roof.

And I was terrified. to the point that I wet the bed.

I just tell you that story 'cause that's how he believed in exciting our imaginations.

-N.C. Wyeth built this studio, which is literally 25 steps away from the house.

-The studio was full of props that N.C. Wyeth needed as an illustrator.

There are swords. There are guns here.

There were a lot of costumes -- Robin Hood, King Arthur.

So these were all available to the children.

-And I made up my own stories of what was happening around me.

These hills became Sherwood Forest, the English countryside, or the battlefields of France.

All these imaginary things floated through my mind.

[ Bird calling ] ♪♪ -One of the things that most fascinated Andrew Wyeth was the amount of World War I objects that were here in the studio.

N.C. Wyeth saved a lot of photographs of the battlefields in France, the trenches, villages that had been totally bombed.

[ Projectiles whistling, explosions ] [ Gunfire ] -N.C. Wyeth also had in the studio boxes of stereo cards, two images taken by a dual camera.

He would put these in a hand-held machine, the two images on the card would come into focus, so you would have this amazing 3-D image in front of you.

[ Propeller whirring, gunfire ] Really, the horror of the war is absolutely displayed in these images.

Young Andrew Wyeth would sit in the studio here and page through them.

[ Explosions, gunfire ] -He collected these small soldiers which were made in Germany -- and German soldiers and American soldiers.

-I can look at those soldiers and remember the names of practically every one of them, make up my own stories.

♪♪ -'The Big Parade,' the movie by King Vidor, which he saw as a child, he was deeply influenced by that film.

[ Bombs whistling ] [ Loud explosions ] I, myself, watched it at least 30 times with him.

He watched it probably over 200 times.

So, you know, that's kind of more than just liking a movie.

-The French girl trying to find him in the crowd, and the motion of carriages going, and her figure there.

I thought it was very dramatic leaving her lone figure there against that rather -- that painted background.

But interesting, what you can do with almost nothing.

♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ -This is the house where my father met my mother.

Ma's father was a newspaper editor.

And he had heard of N.C. Wyeth, and he called upon him in Port Clyde.

And when he was there, he met my father, and he told my father, he said, 'You know, I've got three attractive daughters.'

So, my father, on his birthday, a few days later, drove over here, knocked on the door, and met my mother.

-Betsy said, 'You know, Mary, when I was being courted by Andrew Wyeth, it was a wild, passionate courtship.

I received letters from him every day.

They had drawings in them, and I came home and we were married.

And then we went up to Maine.

And we had fun on a boat for a little while, and then -- pshoo -- right back into the studio.

And I realized I came second to his paintings.

And I had to choose to be with him or not.'

♪♪ -My father had absolutely zero interest in money or possessions.

And so she took all those elements out of his work.

I think, when he started to have a degree of success and whatnot, she made sure that it wasn't going to impinge on what he wanted to do, and all he wanted to do was paint.

-Andrew Wyeth would not be Andrew Wyeth without Betsy.

-At the young age of 18 years old, Betsy became Andrew's manager.

When he had a dealer, Robert Macbeth, it's interesting to see some of the early letters of this young 18-, 19-year-old questioning the commission that they were paying on some of Andy's work.

-She was the one that was very strict on him, forced him to, as she would say, 'work on it until it couldn't be better.'

-He was very dependent on her eye.

-He would bring a painting home and show it to her proudly and hang it on the wall in the mill, and they would work on a title together.

-What a remarkable partnership my mother and father were.

I mean, they both were two halves of this remarkable whole.

♪♪ -I am just stunned by his technical expertise.

He is such a fabulous draftsman.

-To see his hands actually go through a drawing, he was like a conductor with a symphony.

-Andy could paint the wind.

♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ -When Andrew Wyeth's work was first seen, he had a watercolor show in 1937, when he was all of 20 years old that is said to have sold out in a couple of days.

-He was a bright and rising young star.

-For the first 10 years or so of his exhibiting life, he was an artist to keep your eye on.

He had very high success in selling, but also critical success.

♪♪ -My father meant a great deal to me, and we had a marvelous time together, not just as a father but as someone to talk to.

And I think having him taken away so quickly and abruptly, it really jolted me.

[ Train wheels clacking ] [ Train whistle blows ] [ Train rumbling ] ♪♪ -He was up in Maine when N.C. was killed.

[ Bell tolls ] The day of the funeral, Andy wanted to see his father, wanted to spend some time alone with him.

And Andy said to me, 'I went into that room.

The windows were open, and I saw the light come across my father's face, and the wind out the windows blowing the leaves.'

♪♪ Tears are starting to well up as if he's reliving it.

He says, 'I had to do that -- to spend time with him.

And seeing the beauty of the wind, the light across his face.

This is what I'm trying to tell you.

Paint your life history, do the things that mean something to you.'

And I'm crying now, and he's crying.

'Do the things that are your own.'

♪♪ -I think that it changed me from just painting pictures into painting a reality with an edge, with a meaning.

His death really gave me a meaning to paint.

♪♪ -Andy explained this one time early, early on, coming up over the hill and you see this little farm.

And he felt like, you know, he was in Switzerland, just seeing this little farm nestled from the hill.

There's an intimacy about this place, there's a magic, the excitement of the unknown.

-This farm, he'd walk over here from our house, which is just over the hill, and just disappear into the Kuerner world.

-The Kuerners were tremendously forbearing neighbors in that they just let Andy Wyeth come and go, like a ghost.

I mean, he liked it that way.

-Growing up you would see this figure coming in and out, which would be Andy, observing him living his life, and him observing us living ours.

-He didn't really want to upset their daily life.

And they just let him creep through the house and then disappear.

I think he really enjoyed that voyeuristic aspect.

It was fabulous freedom for him, and a sense of his own domain, where he could be like a fly on the wall and watch them.

-When I lost my father in an accident, right near where Kuerners lived, and I regretted so that I hadn't done his portrait.

And Karl reminded me of my father in many ways.

Karl was a much more Germanic-looking man, but they both had that tough quality, Germanic power.

♪♪ And I realized that here was my father still alive.

♪♪ -Karl is a man of hog-butchering and hunting, of guns and knives and no nonsense, a man of the land.

-He wasn't just a Pennsylvania farmer to me.

I mean, I'll be there alone in that house, and now, all of a sudden, a shot will ring out.

[ Gunshots ] And it's Karl maybe hunting deer or maybe he was just target-practicing.

And you'll go into his house and you'll see these rifles slung on the wall.

There's a military feeling.

-Karl was a former machine gunner in the German army.

And, all of a sudden, it was as if one of his toy soldiers had come to life, because there was Karl Kuerner with his helmet and his medals and his coat and his scars and his battle stories, willing, in his broken English, to speak to Andrew Wyeth.

-And that was totally part of Wyeth's imagination -- the violence that lurked in his past, that then somehow enacted itself in Karl as a hunter.

That latent violence fascinated Wyeth.

He always loved to sort of poke at the dark side.

-And I think that if you look at the paintings of Kuerners of mine, you'll begin to sense it's not a quaint farm where they work in the garden and they milk their cows.

When they slaughter a pig, it's -- it's brutal.

♪♪ And I was attracted by this.

♪♪ [ Birds chirping ] -There are very few places he did this in.

He never traveled. [ Goat bleats ] Never went to Europe, you know, to paint.

He wanted to totally tune in to something that he could comprehend and get deeper and deeper and deeper.

And then this -- And he'd get thrilled.

I mean, he would tell me he couldn't sleep at night, to get back there the next day to work on something.

I mean, we're talking about 50 years of it, you know?

Wouldn't you think he'd maybe look for another farm?

♪♪ And with Kuerner, even after death, he then did the painting of Karl lying on this hillside as a drift of snow.

♪♪ [ Wind blowing ] [ Waves washing shoreline ] ♪♪ -Maine, to Andy, was like the surface of the moon.

Harsh, but it was also. fundamental.

♪♪ -Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania, there are big stone houses, big trees, and whatnot.

My father always said, which I think is absolutely true, that in Maine, it's as if a wind could come along and just -- wshhh -- blow everything away.

People are hanging on tenaciously.

And to my father, that contrast was important to him.

-To me, the appeal of Maine is utter simplicity.

The people that live here work off the land or the sea.

-The Olson House sits atop a hill, overlooking the water -- the Cushing peninsula.

The Olson House is a national historic landmark because of the work that one of America's most important artists did over a 30-year period.

-For a number of years, that's all I painted in Maine, were the Olsons.

I could just pour all my thoughts.

Imagination ran free because the house was full of ghosts of the past of New England.

I mean, it was unbelievable.

They were seafaring people, the Olsons.

They were sustenance farmers.

Everyday life was an extraordinary challenge.

-Christina was not emotional outwardly.

She was perhaps as serene as anyone I have ever known.

And she had great poise and self-confidence, so that one forgot the fact that she was lame.

She -- There was no self-pitying in her.

-Christina Olson suffered from a still not entirely diagnosed neurological disease that gradually, over decades, deprived her of the ability to walk.

But by all accounts, she was a stubborn and proud woman who refused to use a wheelchair, and towards the later years of her life, literally had to drag herself around, inside and outside the house.

-I don't think she thought of herself maybe as a cripple.

I don't think she liked that word, and I don't like it either, to describe her.

She just accepted things as they were and made do with what she had.

-Andy first met the Olsons on his first date with his soon-wife-to-be Betsy James.

-She was a great friend of Betsy's, my wife.

They had known her as a little girl.

And I didn't have a studio at that time.

We were building a house in Cushing.

And I asked the Olsons whether I could use one of the upstairs rooms because it was deserted, and I did, and that was how it all started.

-I always think it's so interesting that my mother, young Betsy James, who was 17, she takes him to the Olson House.

It was hardscrabble existence in that house.

No electricity, no water, no refrigeration.

You know, she's sitting on stacks of newspapers that she'd urinate on.

But he took to it like that, and -- and look what he produced from it.

-We had a marvelous time together.

Sometimes we wouldn't say a thing for hours, and then we'd talk.

She felt very easy with me and, I think, enjoyed it.

-And again, it's this world that my father then sort of morphed into, as he had done in Pennsylvania, I think, with the Kuerner farm.

♪♪ -I saw her crawling out to a little truck garden she had next to the house one day.

And it dawned on me, what a terrific, I mean. And I went home and made a quick notation of this idea of Christine in the field, the house in the background.

And several days went by, and this kept building in my mind.

-'Christina's World' is a picture that's actually kind of hard to look at anymore, because it's become such an icon that to come to it fresh is almost impossible.

But that, in a way, is a sign of its strength, that, over decades, people come back to it, generation after generation, and find it haunting.

Even people who don't really know the story of Christina.

-It's enjoyed because there's a spectrum of emotions that it can release.

And that might be loneliness, it might be yearning, it might be something that's lost that can never be seen or rescued again.

It can look like somebody's dream -- a nightmare, maybe even.

This woman seen from the rear, moving herself up towards a little haunted house that's on this very strong horizon.

-A woman longing for something.

Some people pick up that she's crippled.

Some people don't at all, and just think she's yearning.

Everything is incredibly sharp focus.

It's this crystalline world.

I mean, here you have a wisp of her hair blowing, and then, up in the barn, you know, half a mile away, is a shadow of a swallow flying by.

You know, it sure ain't realism.

And that's what I think lifts it into just another world.

♪♪ ♪♪ -I grew up with a young colored boy who I played with for years.

He was really my closest companion as a small boy.

And I found he had great imagination -- much more than the white boys I knew.

-One of Andrew Wyeth's closest friends in childhood was David Lawrence, who was a young African-American boy, who brought him to this part of Chadds Ford.

The black community here was called Little Africa, which may sound charming now, but it really reminds us of an era when neighborhoods that were mostly populated by black people had derisive nicknames given to them by whites.

♪♪ It was because of this insider introduction Wyeth was able to access these people for portraits and for paintings.

♪♪ -I didn't paint them because they were black people.

I painted them because they were my friends.

And I've always felt that the blacks have been painted very poorly.

I'm not saying that I've done it well, but I think they've been caricatured.

♪♪ -So, we're here at the ruins of Mother Archie's Church.

By the middle of the 20th century, it was being used as an African-American church.

The congregation dwindled to a number that really couldn't support it anymore.

And it was converted into a residence.

Different people that Wyeth painted lived for a time in the church, as they did in different makeshift spaces around the area.

-We got along the same as sisters and brothers.

In this place you call Chadds Ford, we got along the same as sisters and brothers.

Andy painted a lot of colored people's pictures around here.

♪♪ -James Loper was mentally challenged, and he would take these long, rambling walks through the countryside around the Wyeth compound.

-This James Loper painting, 1950.

His clothes were all old and fishhooks, and he was looking up to the left.

Over his head was a sickle, and over the sickle was a white sky.

And unless you were stupid, you knew what he meant.

I think that's symbolic of the condition of the black man in the white world.

-Willard Snowden was a hard-luck alcoholic drifter.

The Wyeths gave Snowden a place to live in the old schoolhouse that had once been Andrew's studio.

-He'd been around here, living in my studio for a year.

I'd made a lot of drawings of him to get through to this man, who was a remarkable man, had a little problem of drinking wine.

And he constantly needed to feed that disease.

And Andrew was really amenable to that, sometimes using liquor as a way to get Snowden to sit for him.

He would promise to drive him to the package store, before or after those sittings.

This is a complicated thing.

I think that this was emblematic of how Wyeth treated people around him, treated his subjects, treated his friends.

He didn't try to change them or set them on a more 'correct' path.

He thought of these people as folks who were struggling with various challenges.

In paintings of Snowden, sometimes we see the ravages of alcohol directly affecting his body.

We can see him in these slightly compromised situations.

Wyeth painted him without his knowledge, occasionally.

Wyeth both does a really beautiful thing in showing his subjects as they are, but it's also sometimes really painful to look at when you know the stories of these people's lives.

He was really interested in finding the dignity that his subjects had, and expressing it, no matter how difficult their lives were.

♪♪ Andrew Wyeth was in an important 1940s exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art, called 'American Realists and Magic Realists.'

♪♪ -He was accepted among the avant garde.

His work was shown at the Museum of Modern Art.

He was seen as a magic realist.

-His big moment was when the Museum of Modern Art decided to buy a painting by him.

Of course, that was 'Christina's World.'

♪♪ So, this looked, at the moment, that Andrew Wyeth was entering into dialogue with all the great modern masters that the Museum of Modern Art collected, and he was being integrated into what was seen as the most important collection of contemporary art in this country.

♪♪ -I want to express my feelings, rather than illustrate them.

♪♪ Technique is just a means of arriving at a statement.

♪♪ -There comes a moment, mostly in the '60s and '70s, where abstract art becomes the definition of what contemporary art is.

-Modern artists don't try to mirror or illustrate the new, complex world.

But like the artists of any age, they cannot help expressing the basic assumptions of their time.

-It's the era of de Kooning, Mark Rothko, Jackson Pollock.

-I don't work from drawings or colored sketches.

-It's always been the responsibility of an artist to examine what is in the world at this moment.

An artist can't afford to be a sentimental commentator.

-And in that climate, Andrew began to look old-fashioned.

-But some very few artists still find a means of personal expression in the traditional and the familiar.

Such a painter is Andrew Wyeth.

-In the art world, Andrew Wyeth was thought of as a regionalist or sort of a down-home painter.

Maybe just the populism of it, you know?

Because he was so popular.

-There was a sense that he was easy, that the reason he gathered these mass audiences for his exhibition was because he was accessible.

Members of that audience could understand his art and be moved by it without having to work very hard.

-That's when critics really started to slam him, that, 'Oh, he's this popular with the common man, then he can't really be taken seriously.'

-'Christina's World' -- the painting hangs in the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and a million people a year look at it.

-There was also this sense that Wyeth played to his audience, that he wasn't subtle enough or nuanced enough.

-Is it possible for an artist himself to say how he would like to be described, if you could write the definitive statement?

-It's very hard to put it into words, but I'd say my whole aim is to try to do a portrait of the things that emotionally mean a great deal to me.

-I don't feel he's a 20th-century artist.

He doesn't leave anything up to your own imagination.

-It's like a typical poster artist.

Beautiful pictures, but no emotional feeling.

♪♪ -I came up with this word for the critical dispute.

I would call it the Wyeth Curse.

It was people judging him without looking at him.

And also people judging his audience as if somehow the audience that went to Andrew Wyeth would not be the audience that would then turn around and go see an exhibition by Jackson Pollock or Willem de Kooning.

-When 'Groundhog Day' was purchased by the Philadelphia Museum of Art, it was the highest price ever paid for a contemporary artist.

That almost created a certain kind of resentment, among bohemian artists who were starving in garrets, that Wyeth was so successful, that he was making thousands of dollars for realist paintings.

It somehow rubbed against the grain.

And so where Wyeth had actually been swimming along with all these other painters, happily, he suddenly was made into an opposition.

It wounded him, and he really was driven into retreat.

And what he did was run to Chadds Ford and to Maine and just make his own world for himself.

♪♪ -The enviable thing about painting is that you can continue to paint. It really has no real effect.

It's not like theater, where they close the theater, film, I mean, you know, bad reviews and so forth.

He kept on painting, which, of course, drives the critics mad.

♪♪ [ Wind blowing ] -I remember, one time, I was out there in Chadds Ford.

I get there early, and I look out the window of the granary, and I see Andy walking in the snow.

And I see him stop, and he's looking down.

And he looks down at this dead deer in the snow.

And he's just looking at it for 10 minutes.

He looks, his hands behind his back, the way he always walked, and he looked down.

And eventually. he walked back, got in his Jeep, drove on to the studio.

♪♪ -He's really an artist who works from memory.

And I think it's a mischaracterization of him to just call him a realist.

He doesn't operate like a camera.

He's making stuff up. He's manipulating reality.

He always admired the abstract expressionists and felt kinship with them.

♪♪ Looking at his work, you can see the splashiness, the expressiveness of his work, that has a lot in common with Franz Kline.

♪♪ Number two, there is this surrealistic bent, which is deeply modern, and then there's a very strong abstract style that he's working with.

If you look at a painting like 'River Cove,' which is really organized like a Mark Rothko -- big simple shapes, the sense of the two-dimensional pattern on the surface of the painting.

-One of the awful things the critics say is that he paints every blade of grass.

If you get up close to it, it is not every blade of grass.

It's a strange woven pattern.

-He was tapping into the rhythms of nature, so he looked at the grass, he got it, it was just -- pop, pop, pop, pop, pop -- the brush just danced across the surface of the painting.

-I don't think people begin to realize how complicated his compositions are.

♪♪ He can often do things off-center.

He can have a house out on the left, with just fields to the right.

Or the famous one of the boy running down the hill, where you've got all that emptiness, and then this little energetic, dark figure that is racing from the hill.

His aerial views, his worm-eye views, his ways of featuring windows and doors up close, so that it's a frame within a frame.

He would say, over and over again, that he liked to turn his paintings upside down and judge the composition by what he saw.

And if it didn't have the strength of composition, then it wasn't yet a good painting.

-When you're looking at these paintings, I think you have a sense of unease, almost, of restlessness, of depth, even if you don't know the stories.

This is the Kuerners' kitchen.

'Groundhog Day' was begun in this room, and it started with him having lunch here and just seeing the fall of light, the sunshine across the wallpaper.

That just struck his imagination.

And as he himself later said, 'I left and went up on the hill and sat on the hill and looked down on the house and started to make sketches from memory.'

-And I sat up there, and I began to think of that kitchen way down below.

And that's when I began to dream about what I wanted.

I wanted you to feel the enclosure of the building and yet the country outside.

-So, after imagining the whole concept, he came back.

By this time, Karl had gone.

And he started to sketch Mrs. Kuerner seated by the windowsill, and the family dog, Nellie.

They became part of this galaxy of the painting that he gradually simplified.

He made dozens and dozens of drawings as he tried to think about, 'What is the key image here?'

And it boiled down to just the empty table waiting for Karl to come home.

-Karl was off at a farm sale, but there was his place, set.

It's more of a portrait of Karl than almost if it had been him being there, you know?

Knives were very important to him, as a man.

I mean, cutting up animals, and he always carried a knife with him.

I think there was a fork there, but that didn't interest me, 'cause I wanted to express this real person.

-That's that sense of imminence in the painting.

And then there's this strange story of the dog -- you know, the nasty dog. It was a guard dog.

-The log outside of the window with that tooth, like the fangs of the dog, really became the dog so that I could eliminate the dog.

I realized that I was overtelling my story, because there were the sharp teeth of that German shepherd.

-So, if you're looking out the window of the painting, there's this scary log staring at you that looks like it's about to come charging into the kitchen.

That sense of violence in the very dog and in the Karl Kuerner who's not there anymore is part of the restlessness of this painting, because on the one hand, it's so serene, and then, the more you look at it, the more there are these unsettling aspects that can't really be explained.

And they're part of that distillation of how he came to make the image.

-American artist Andrew Wyeth, who is known for powerful paintings of tenderness and mystery, turns out to have kept the biggest mystery so well.

-For 15 years, Helga was the secret occupation of America's best-known living artist.

-The art world along with the general public and even Wyatt's wife were stunned.

-I think it was a scandal partly because he'd kept all of this work secret.

And everybody was titillated by the idea that he had a whole body of work that he was not telling his wife about, not telling the rest of the world about, and that there were a lot of nudes involved and a beautiful young woman.

So that, in itself, was a kind of soap opera.

-The day that it broke, we had 'USA Today,' 'Time,' 'Newsweek' just zeroing in on the farm here and wanting to know all about this.

-A large body of work on one subject. -Over and over, he drew her.

-You had asked about what Chadds Ford was like.

It wasn't as wild as Maine.

-The Wyeths have not explained the mystery.

-They went out to their island to get away, and there were helicopters going over.

♪♪ -To an outsider looking in, there's a story unbeknownst to them that draws them in like a magnet.

-Just the daring of this show.

The explicitness of some of the images.

-And I think the show is sensational.

I don't care what the critics say.

-That story was then twisted into a manipulation.

-There is endless speculation that it was all a publicity stunt.

-He was accused of having done the whole thing in order to create headlines, and that the secret was not a secret, it was a conspiracy.

-I don't know if I told you about him sharing with me why he did the Helga paintings.

♪♪ He said, 'I needed to be away from Betsy and have some space.'

-He was so happy not to ever pay bills, not to ever sell prints.

Betsy took care of all of that.

Betsy wanted to see whatever he painted that day, do the catalogue, number it, and so forth.

-Why did you keep the paintings a secret?

-I'd been painting houses, barns, and all of a sudden, I saw this girl, and I said, 'My God, if I could get her to pose, she personifies everything I feel.

I'm not going to tell anyone about this.

I'm just going to paint it.'

-He wanted to fulfill his soul.

He needed just to do that for himself.

He was always producing. No artist wants to be taken for granted that you produce -- produce for the sake of producing.

You'll never, never produce anything good if you don't have something you paint for yourself.

♪♪ -When word of the Helga collection came out, that was really shocking to her.

She looked at me, and she said, 'Did you know?'

And I said, 'No. I had no idea.'

♪♪ 200 drawings and watercolors.

The rest were framed temperas.

I kept seeing these and looking at her, and looking at her looking at the paintings, and thinking, 'What is she thinking?

How can she separate her emotion from the real appreciation of the paintings?'

-It unsettled her, the fact that I never told her.

But she realizes that she's living with a man that's wrapped up in my painting.

-Meanwhile, Helga felt betrayed, because he promised her that he would not let them out.

You don't know what's going to happen, you know?

I was never made for the public.

♪♪ -So, you have two very different personalities.

Betsy was extremely controlling.

Helga was extremely adaptable.

If he wanted to go down the ravine in the winter -- One time he told me she carried a dead deer up a hill.

So she would just do whatever he said.

-He took what I had to say, and I took what he had to say.

You sense it, what he needs.

There was no question about it. You just did it naturally.

-It was something that I was doing, and my imagination -- I painted every minute.

♪♪ -Being able to paint Helga gave him all of this magnificent energy he never had before.

He was actually able to double the work.

Don't you see? I gave him confidence.

-Many of the things he was doing concurrently are related to these Helga works.

♪♪ -Betsy -- she has a sense of order.

You have a collection over 15 years, and she always wants to know what came first, second, third, fourth.

What helped her deal with this whole thing was to put everything in order.

And that was the only thing that grounded her.

She was so big to rise above it and really appreciate the works for what they were.

♪♪ -The Helga pictures have some extraordinary, beautiful paintings.

They are not only fabulous, in terms of their technique, but the composition, the subject matter, they are really striking pictures.

So I think they're some of his finest paintings.

There's still, of course, an erotic story that's unavoidable.

That's potent in these pictures.

But I think we can also see them as great paintings.

-I think every painting has a mystery to it that only the artist and the subject know. that will never be shared in reality.

-We danced, and we laughed at the whole world together.

I think he rediscovered the whole world in himself.

♪♪ ♪♪ -When you know something and feel it and have a love for it, my God, do it.

♪♪ -Andrew Wyeth was an artist 24 hours a day.

He spent the entire day walking, exploring, sketching, thinking.

-It's like you're being a child again.

You can do what you want, and you can do what you love.

How many people in life get to do what they love to do?

-I've never met anyone else that was alive in the world the way he was.

-He painted up until the end.

When he was dying in bed, in the upper bedroom, someone said, 'Come here, look.'

And he was asleep, but his hand. ♪♪ -He was drawing, in the dream.

♪♪ -His final words to me, when we were saying goodbye and I leaned down and he pulled me in and looked at me right in the eye and said, 'Give them hell.'

-I'm so glad he lived past 2000, because it was a sea change.

And they had a 'Rediscovering Andrew Wyeth' session at the big national convention of art historians.

And the young people threw aside all the horrible criticism of their seniors, rebelled, and looked at Andrew Wyeth.

He got to participate in nine years of that, of hearing people look at him anew.

-I think this is a moment for not only the public to rediscover him, but for art historians to really rethink him.

-I think we've moved beyond the easy opposition of realism and abstraction which I think was the story back in the 1960s.

And I think it's now possible to see him as just a different way of being modern.

♪♪ -He painted his own backyard.

When you paint what you know and what you know with truth, that love is universal.

-Wyeth's pictures always capture people.

They stare at them and just roam around in them.

When we did the exhibition at the museum, it actually was not unusual to find people in tears in front of the paintings, and paintings that weren't overtly sad.

It opened up memories in people, and I think that's one of the powers in his work, is that the emotion that he banks into the picture allows people to unlock emotion of their own.

♪♪ -If you look at the light on the corner of the wall in the window in 'Groundhog Day,' there is nothing, anywhere, written in the history of art, about art -- no words compare to what he did.

♪♪ That sunlight traveled eight minutes from the sun, came through the atmosphere, through that window, and struck the side of that window frame and that wall.


Rethinking Andrew Wyeth, David Cateforis, ed. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2014, is a critical reassessment with contributions from several contemporary scholars. The Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts (CASVA) hosts “Andrew Wyeth in Context: Contemporary Art and Scholarship”, a conference at the National Gallery presenting papers on various aspects of the artist’s work. The scholars’ symposium also travels to the galleries and historic properties of the Brandywine River Museum of Art.

Andrew Wyeth - History

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Andrew Wyeth - CHESTER COUNTY FARM - 29 1/2 X 21 1/2 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
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Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - CHESTER COUNTY FARM - 14 X 10 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - CHRISTINA'S WORLD (REPRINTED) - 25 3/4 X 17 1/4 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - CHRISTINA'S WORLD - 35 1/4 X 23 5/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email




Andrew Wyeth - CIDER BARREL - 28 3/4 X 21 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - CLOUDS AND SHADOWS - 19 5/8 X 15 1/2 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - COLD SPRING - 17 1/4 X 23 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - COMBERS - 7 X 9 1/2 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - COOT HUNTER - 29 3/4 X17 7/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - COOT HUNTER - 20 X 12 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - COOT HUNTER - 14 X 8 1/4 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - CRESCENT - 20 X 14 1/4 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - CRYSTAL LAMP, THE - 13 5/8 X 18 3/4 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - DAY OF THE FAIR - 24 X 18 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - DISTANT THUNDER - 17 3/8 X 28 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - DODGE'S RIDGE lg - 29 7/8 X 25 1/2 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - DODGE'S RIDGE also titled- The Scarecrow - 20 1/8 X 17 3/16 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - DR. SYN POSTER - 24 X 32 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER - 11 1/2 X 13 3/4 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - EDGE OF THE FIELD - 27 3/8 Inches 19 1/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - EDGE OF THE FIELD - 14 X 10 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - ELWELL'S SAWMILL - 28 3/4 X 20 7/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - END OF OLSONS - 24 X 24 3/8 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



>click here to purchase online<
Andrew Wyeth - EVENING AT KUERNERS - 28 3/4 X 18 1/2 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but a limited number are in stock
Price: $300



Andrew Wyeth - FARAWAY - 21 3/8 X 13 5/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - FLOOD PLAIN - 18 5/8 X 9 3/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - FLOUR MILL POSTER - 24 X 36 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - FORTUNE TELLER - 22 3/8 X 29 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - FROM MT. KEARSARGE - 29 X 21 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - FROM MT. KEARSARGE - 14 X 10 1/4 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - FULL MOON - 22 X 17 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - GERANIUMS - 15 3/8 X 20 1/2 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - GROUND HOG DAY (Holland Printing) - 18 1/4 X 17 3/4 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - GROUND WIRE POSTER - 32 X 28 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - HALF BUSHEL - 24 5/8 X 18 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - HALF BUSHEL - 14 X 10 Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - HAY LEDGE (See poster P-59) - 38 1/2 X 18 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - IDES OF MARCH - 18 5/8 X 11 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - IDES OF MARCH (reprinted in 2000) - 32 7/8 X 19 7/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction $32.00
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - KARL'S ROOM - 28 5/8 X 22 1/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - KARL'S ROOM - 14 X 10 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - KELP LEDGE - 29 1/2 X 20 5/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - KELP LEDGE - 14 X 10 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - LIBERTY LAUNCH - 20 1/2 X 28 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - LIFEBOAT SHED - 29 X 21 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - LOBSTER MAN - 21 1/2 X 15 7/8 Inches Horizontal Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - LOBSTER MAN - 14 X 10 1/2 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - LOVE IN THE AFTERNOON - 18 5/8 X 11 1/4 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - MAGA'S DAUGHTER - 14 1/2 X 12 5/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - MAP OF CHESTER COUNTY - 22 1/2 X 24 3/8 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - MARSH HAWK - 36 X 25 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - MASTER OF THE FOX HOUNDS - 18 7/8 X 13 5/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - MAY BASKET - 13 1/2 X 10 3/4 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - MAY DAY - 29 1/2 X 12 3/4 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - MCVEY'S BARN - 23 7/8 X 16 3/16 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - MOTHER ARCHIE'S CHURCH - 30 X 15 1/2 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - MRS. KUERNER - 17 1/4 X 12 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - MUSKRAT TRAPS - 23 3/4 X 15 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - NEW CASTLE FERRY - 19 X 14 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - NICK AND JAMIE - 19 1/4 X 14 3/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - NORTHERN POINT - 17 1/2 X 34 7/8 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - OFF TEEL'S ISLAND - 17 5/8 X 14 1/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - OLSON FARM, THE - 29 3/8 X 21 3/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - OLSON FARM, THE - 14 X 10 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - OUTPOST - 23 1/4 X 23 1/4 Inches SQUARE Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - RACCOON - 27 7/8 X 27 7/8 Inches SQUARE Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - SALT MARSHES - 27 1/4 X 19 1/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - SALT MARSHES - 14 X 10 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - SANDSPIT - 24 X 17 1/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - SCARECROW - 17 X 20 1/8 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - SCHOONER AGROUND - 29 X 17 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - SCHOONER AGROUND - 14 X 8 1/4 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - SEA ANCHOR - 25 7/8 X 18 7/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - SHED LANTERN - 16 X 25 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - SPINDRIFT - 36 X 15 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - SPINDRIFT - 16 X 6 1/2 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - SPLIT ASH BASKET - 29 3/4 X 19 7/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - SPLIT ASH BASKET - 14 X 10 1/4 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - SPOOL BED (CHROMOGRAPHY) - 27 X 22 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - SPRING BEAUTY - 30 X 19 7/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - SPRING BEAUTY - 15 X 10 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - SPRING FED - 36 X 25 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print)


Andrew Wyeth - ST. GEORGE'S PINES - 14 5/8 X 9 5/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - THAT GENTLEMAN - 29 7/8 X 14 3/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - THAT GENTLEMAN - 14 X 10 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - THE ACADEMY - 28 3/4 X 18 1/4 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - THE CLEARING / BACK PASTURE - 19 1/4 X 24 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - THE CLOISTERS - 23 7/8 X 18 5/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - THE CLOISTERS - 14 X 11 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - THE MILL - 22 1/2 X 14 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - THE SCHOOLMASTER - 12 1/2 X 13 1/2 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - THE SISTERS - 22 1/2 X 13 7/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - THE SLEIGH - 18 1/2 X 13 3/4 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - THE SLIP - 26 X 18 1/4 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - THE SWEEP - 30 X 20 1/2 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - THEY REACHED UP AND GAVE US THE SKY - 8 X 9 3/8 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - THIN ICE - 34 1/4 X 27 7/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - TOLLING BELL - 17 1/2 X 23 7/8 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - TOLLING BELL - 10 X 14 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - TOP OF THE MILL - 22 5/8 X 16 1/8 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - TRODDEN WEED - 12 3/4 X 14 1/8 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - UNDER SAIL - 27 X 19 1/2 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - UNIONVILLE - 18 7/8 X 7 3/4 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - WASH HOUSE - 21 1/2 X 29 7/8 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - WATERFALL - 22 5/8 Inches 15 7/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - WEST WINDOW - 21 1/2 X 29 1/2 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - WEST WINDOW - 16 X 22 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - WEST WINDOW - 10 X 14 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - THE WHITE DORY - 18 1/8 X12 7/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - WIND FROM THE SEA - 22" x 28" Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Price: $35


Andrew Wyeth - WISHBONE - 20 X 14 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - WOLF RIVERS - 12 3/4 X 13 3/8 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction $20.00
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - WOOD STOVE - 24 1/4 X 12 3/4 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - WRITING CHAIR - 13 X 20 1/4 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - YOUNG AMERICA - 19 1/4 X 13 1/2 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - YOUNG FISHERMAN AND DORY - 32 1/2 X 20 1/4 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - ZOAR VALLEY - 23 1/8 X 17 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

LIMITED EDITIONS/OUT OF PRINT


Andrew Wyeth - HER ROOM (2,000)(See poster P-45B) - 27 1/4 X 14 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - INDEPENDENCE HALL (950) - 24 1/4 X 18 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - MARSHALL POINT LIGHT - 18 X 12 3/4 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - RURAL HOLIDAY - 20 X 15 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - SEED CORN - 20 X 14 1/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - THE QUAKER (COLLOTYPE) - 22 1/4 X 20 1/4 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

TRITON PRESS PORTFOLIO 1956 (Ltd Ed - 5 Portfolios Signed- 10 Images) ALL O/P POR


Andrew Wyeth - BLUE DUMP - 22 3/8 X 18 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - CHRISTINA OLSON - 18 X 24 Vertical Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - COOLING SHED - 12 1/4 X 24 1/8 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - FARAWAY - 21 3/8 X 12 1/4 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - KARL - 18 X 24 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - NICHOLAS - 18 X 19 1/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - NORTHERN POINT - 12 1/8 X 24 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - THE OAK - 18 1/8 X 24 1/4 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - WIND FROM THE SEA - 23 7/8 X 16 3/4 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - YOUNG AMERICA - 24 X 17 1/4 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

FOUR SEASONS PORTFOLIO 1962 - ALL O/P POR


Andrew Wyeth - BERRY PICKER - 12 1/2 X 8 5/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - BRINTONS MILL - 13 1/4 X 8 1/2 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - BURNING OFF - 9 1/4 X 11 3/4 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - CANVASBACKS (B & W) - 6 5/8 X 12 5/8 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - EARLY OCTOBER - 7 3/8 X 11 1/2 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - MAY DAY - 13 1/2 X 9 3/4 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - NEW LEAVES (B & W) - 11 1/2 X 8 5/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - QUAKER LADIES - 13 1/4 X 8 1/2 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - SPRING SUN - 13 1/4 X 8 5/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - STORING UP (B & W) - 11 1/4 X 8 5/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - TEEL'S ISLAND - 13 1/4 X 5 1/2 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - THE CORNER - 14 X 9 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

METROPOLITAN MUSEUM PORTFOLIO - 15 Portfolios Signed/Collotype (10 Images) ALL O/P POR


Andrew Wyeth - AFTERNOON FLIGHT - 28 1/2 X 22 7/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - CANADA - 28 3/8 X 17 7/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - CHRISTINA'S TEAPOT - 28 1/2 X 22 7/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - CIDER BARREL - 22 1/2 X 20 7/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - END OF OLSONS - 18 14 X 19 1/4 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - FENCE LINE - 29 5/8 X 21 1/2 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - THE FINN - 21 1/4 X 29 3/8 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - MY YOUNG FRIEND - 25 X 31 7/8 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - NOGEESHIK - 21 1/2 X 23 7/8 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - TEEL'S ISLAND - 22 3/8 X 9 3/4 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

METROPOLITAN MUSEUM PORTFOLIO Prestudies/ 15 Port Signed/Collotype (10) ALL O/P POR


Andrew Wyeth - BLUE MEASURE - 13 7/8 X 11 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - CHRISTINA'S WORLD - 17 7/8 X 14 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - EVENING AT KUERNERS - 22 3/4 X 17 1/2 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - KUERNERS (STUDY FOR ANNA) - 25 3/4 X 21 1/2 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - MY YOUNG FRIEND - 16 3/4 X 13 1/4 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - NEW ENGLAND - 28 1/4 X 21 3/4 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - NOGEESHIK - 27 1/4 X 22 3/4 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - SNOW FLURRIES - 20 5/8 X 12 7/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - SPRING FED (1) - 28 1/2 X 21 3/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print)


Andrew Wyeth - SPRING FED (2) - 28 3/8 X 22 3/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print)

ANDREW WYETH POSTERS


Andrew Wyeth - ALVARO AND CHRISTINA 2000 - 23 X 18 1/8 Inches Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - ALVARO AND CHRISTINA 2001 - ovrl 26 15/16 X 25 Inches Horizontal Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - BARRACOON / STUDY (HELGA) 1987 - 29 X 27 1/4 Inches Horizontal Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - BARRACOON / STUDY 1996 - 25x19 1/4-25x25 1/8 Horizontal Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - BATTLEGROUND, 1995 - 24 X 36 Inches Vertical Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - BLUE MEASURE 1985 - 16 7/8 X 22 7/8 Inches Vertical Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - BRAIDS, (HELGA) 1987 - 25 X 25 Inches SQR Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - BREAKFAST AT OLSONS, 1989 - 22 X 33 Inches Vertical Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - BROAD COVE FARM 1978 - 16 7/8 X 22 Inches Vertical Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - CAPE COAT (THE HELGA PICTURES) 1992 - 20 X 39 1/2 Inches Vertical Poster Unframed $35.00


Andrew Wyeth - CHESTER COUNTY 2001 - 24 X 171/4ovrl30X24 Horizontal Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - CHRISTINA'S WORLD, 1997 NO DATE - 27X18 1/8/ 30 X 24 Inches Horizontal Poster Unframed $14.00
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email
Andrew Wyeth - CHRISTINA'S WORLD, 1987 - 36 X 29 Inches Horizontal Poster Unframed $22.00
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - CROWN OF FLOWERS, 1993 - 11 1/8 X 17 Inches Vertical Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - DAYDREAM,1991 (HELGA) - 29 1/4 X 20 1/4 Inches Horizontal Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - DISTANT THUNDER 1983 - 16 X 20 Inches Vertical Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - EARLY SNOW 1982 - 30 3/8 X 24 1/2 Inches Horizontal Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - EARLY SNOW, 1995 - 35 X 33 Inches Horizontal Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - EASTER SUNDAY, (HELGA)1987 - 30 X 27 1/8 Inches Horizontal Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - FARAWAY 1978 - 20 1/4 X 14 1/4 Inches Horizontal Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - FARM ROAD (HELGA) 1988 - 27 1/8 X 28 Inches Vertical Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - GROUND HOG DAY 1984 - 22 1/2 X 33 Inches Vertical Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - GROUND HOG DAY, 1987,NO DATE - 22 1/2 X 29 Inches Vertical Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - HAY LEDGE 2001 - 26 1/4 X 12 1/4 Inches Poster Unframed $18.00
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - HAY LEDGE 2001 - ovrl 30 X 20 1/4 Inches Horizontal Poster Unframed $18.00
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - HER ROOM, 1994, FRN, NO DATE - 34 X 22 Inches Horizontal Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - HOUND BAYING AT THE SEA 1978 - 17 3/8 X 24 5/8 Inches Vertical Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - IN THE ORCHARD 1988 (Helga) - 32 X 25 1/2 Inches Horizontal Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - IN THE ORCHARD 2002-overall 28 x22 1/4 - 26 1/4 X 16 1/2 Inches image Horizontal Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - KNAPSACK 1981 FRANCE - 18 3/8 X 30 3/8 Inches Vertical Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - LADY OF THE HOUSE - 25 X 36 Inches Vertical Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - LAST LIGHT, 1992 - 32 X 25 Inches Horizontal Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - LAWN CHAIR,1992 - 20X29 3/8/20X32 3/4 Vertical Poster Unframed $30.00

Andrew Wyeth - MAIDEN VOYAGE, 1990 - 28 X 34 Inches/36 X 36Inches SQR Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - MARSH HAWK 1978 - 20 1/4 X 14 1/4 Inches Horizontal Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - MAY DAY 1970 - 19 3/4 X 18 3/8 Inches Horizontal Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - MILK CANS 1980 - 27 7/8 X 11 Inches Horizontal Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - MILL POND,1996-'97 - 24 X 20 Inches/25 X 29 Inches Vertical Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - NEW ENGLAND,1992, LTD. ED.(500) - 29 X 24 7/8 Inches Horizontal Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - OLSON HOUSE, STUDY FOR, 1981 - 20 1/4 X 28 5/8 Inches Verical Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - OUTPOST 1977 - 22 X 30 7/8 Inches Vertical Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - RAVENS GROVE, 1988 - 23 X 33 1/16 Inches Vertical Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - ROASTED CHESTNUTS,1988 - 28 5/8 X 40 1/2 Inches Vertical Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - RUM RUNNER, 1989 - 30 1/2 X 19 1/4 Inches Horizontal Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - SEA BOOTS 1980 - 20 X 29 7/8 Inches Vertical Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - SNOW HILL, 1995 - 19 X 25 Inches Vertical Documantary Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - THAT GENTLEMAN,1991 - 33 X 21 3/4 Inches Horizontal Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - THE HUNTER,1995 - 21 X 19 Inches/26 X 25 Inches Horizontal Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - THE QUAKER 1979 - 20 7/8 X 29 7/8 Inches Vertical Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - THE QUAKER, 1989 - 24 1/4 X 24 1/2 Inches Vertical Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - THE REEFER 1978 - 29 1/2 X 42 1/4 Inches Vertical Poster Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - THE REVENANT (STUDY FOR)1984 - Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - LIMITED EDITION 400 - 22 X 22 7/8 Inches Vertical Poster Unf Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - TRODDEN WEED 1984 - 22 X 27 7/8 Inches Vertical Poster Unf Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - WEATHERSIDE 1976 - 22 1/2 X 38 3/4 Inches Vertical Poster Unf Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - WEATHERSIDE (STUDY FOR) 1980 - 20 X 29 7/8 Inches Vertical Poster Unf Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - WIND FROM THE SEA 1978 - 28 1/2 X 20 3/8 Inches Horizontal Poster Unf Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - WINDOW, STUDY FOR HER ROOM 2001 - 20 X 15 Inches-22 X 26 1/2 Inches Vertical Poster Unf Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - WINDOW LIGHT 1985 - 21 3/8 X 34 1/8 Inches Vertical Poster Unf Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - WOLF MOON 1976 - 27 3/4 X 38 3/4 Inches Vertical Poster Unf Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - YOUNG AMERICA 1976 - 28 X 22 Inches Horizontal Poster Unf Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

SIGNED AND NUMBERED (100 ONLY) ALL O/P POR


Andrew Wyeth - ARTHUR CLEVELAND - 18 7/8 X 26 1/8 Inches Vertical Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - HER ROOM - 27 1/4 X 14 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

SIGNED LIMITED EDITIONS / A WYETH - CALL - O/P POR


Andrew Wyeth - BEAUTY MARK (300) + 20 AP'S 1985 - 19 1/2 X 21 3/4 Inches Vertical collotype Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - BIRD IN THE HOUSE (300)+20 AP'S 1984 - 19 X 26 Inches Vertical collotype Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - BLACK WATER (200) 1978 - 24 1/2 X 18 Inches Horizontal collotype Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - CRANBERRIES (300) 1981 + 20 AP'S - 12 X 18 Inches Vertical collotype Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - sold as a set with SEA RUNNING /SLE-5B - collotype Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - DISTANT THUNDER (300) 1980 + 20 AP'S - 19 X 29 7/8 Inches Vertical collotype Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - DOGWOOD (300) 1983 + 20 AP'S - 24 X 16 Inches Horizontal collotype Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - FLOUR MILL (300) 1992/JAPAN ONLY - 15 1/4 X 21 1/4 Inches Vertical collotype Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - FOG BELL (250) 1978 - 18 3/4 X 27 3/4 Inches Vertical collotype Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - HARLEQUIN (300) 1997 - 17 1/4 X 14 1/2 Inches Horizontal Giclee Iris Unf Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - INDIAN SUMMER (200) 1978 - 21 1/2 X 26 Inches Vertical collotype Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - JACKLIGHT (300) 1982 + 20 AP'S - 32 X 28 Inches Horizontal collotype Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - JUPITER (300) 2000 - 34 X 34 Inches/40 X40 Inches Square Offset Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - NIGHT SLEEPER (300) 1981 + 20 AP'S - 30 X 20 Inches Horizontal collotype Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - NORTH LIGHT (300) , 1994, 10 AP'S - 29 3/8 X 21 3/8 Inches Horizontal Offset Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - OLSON'S (300) 1992 - 31 1/4 X 20 7/8 Inches Horizontal Offset Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - OPEN HOUSE (300) 1980 + 20 AP'S - 29 7/8 X 16 Inches Horizontal collotype Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - REEFER, THE (300) 1982 + 20 AP'S - 26 X 26 Inches SQR collotype Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email

Andrew Wyeth - SAUNA (200) 1979 - 19 1/2 X 22 7/8 Inches Vertical collotype Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - SEA RUNNING (300) 1981 + 20 AP'S - 14 1/2 X 11 Inches Horizontal collotype Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - sold as a set with CRANBERRIES /SLE-5A - collotype Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email


Andrew Wyeth - SEABED (200) 1980 - 14 1/8 X 14 Inches Horizontal collotype Reproduction from an Original Painting
Image O/P (out of print) but may still be in stock, Call or Email to check availability
Price:Call or Email



Andrew Wyeth - SIRI (200) 1979 - 19 3/4 X 19 1/2 Inches Horizontal collotype Reproduction from an Original Painting
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Andrew Wyeth - SOUTHERN COMFORT (300) 1997 - 28 1/2 X 20 1/4 Inches Horizontal Giclee Iris Frmd Reproduction from an Original Painting
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Andrew Wyeth - SQUARE DANCE SCENE (86) 1987 - 5 7/8 X 4 1/2 Inches Horizontal Offset Reproduction from an Original Painting
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Andrew Wyeth - WASHINGTON&LAFAYETTE AT CHADDS FORD (204) - 17 X 11 Inches Horizontal Offset Reproduction from an Original Painting
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Andrew Wyeth - MAGA'S DAUGHTER - 10 X 8 3/4 Inches Horizontal Avail only Reproduction from an Original Painting
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Andrew Wyeth - MAY DAY - 13 X 5 3/4 Inches Horizontal Avail only Jpn Reproduction from an Original Painting
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Andrew Wyeth - OUTPOST - 9 5/8 X 10 Inches Vertical Avail only Jpn Reproduction from an Original Painting
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Andrew Wyeth - EASTER SUNDAY (HBOOK Pg 93)July'94 - 24 1/2 X 17 5/8 Inches Horizontal Unframed Reproduction from an Original Painting
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Мир Кристины

Эндрю Уайета никак не назовешь автором одного шлягера. Он был чрезвычайно плодовитым художником. Он работал как одержимый. Он сделал весомый вклад в историю американской живописи, в известной степени он история американской живописи и есть.

И все же есть в его послужном списке картина, которая стоит особняком, несколько возвышаясь над всем остальным. Как «Yesterday» в творчестве «The Beatles» или «Гражданин Кейн» в фильмографии Орсона Уэллса.

Небо, девушка, поле. Летний ветер играет с выбившейся из прически прядью – на первый взгляд, «Мир Кристины» может показаться пасторалью. Но приглядевшись внимательнее, вы, конечно, заметите, что худоба героини – болезненна, а в ее позе угадывается отнюдь не буколическое напряжение.

Это – Кристина Олсон, соседка художника по летнему дому в штате Мэн. Кристина страдала от последствий полиомиелита и была частично парализована. Будучи то ли слишком скромной, то ли слишком гордой для того, чтобы просить кого-то толкать инвалидное кресло, она передвигалась по окрестностям самостоятельно. Обманчиво идиллический мир Кристины, на самом деле, полон страдания и несгибаемой воли. Эндрю Уайета не зря сравнивают с лучшими американскими романистами двадцатого века. Он раньше Сэлинджера понял, что если есть рожь, должна быть и пропасть.

Когда Уайет работал над «Миром Кристины», его роман с акварелью практически сошел на нет. Эндрю сделал выбор в пользу темперных красок, неспешной, почти медитативной техники, которая помогала обуздать порывистый темперамент, располагала к проникновению в суть вещей. Биограф Уайета Ричард Меримен однажды сказал: «Обманчиво гладкий покров темперы был для него как крышка на котле, из которого рвутся эмоции».

Уайет не торопился – поле и постройки вдали он писал в течение четырех месяцев. И все это время боролся с искушением обойтись без Кристины: виртуоз недосказанностей, он хотел, чтобы драма едва угадывалась за благостным пейзажем. «Нужно было обойтись вообще без девушки, - скажет он позднее, - слишком много сюжета».

К слову, «девушке» к тому времени исполнилось 55, и в образе Кристины Уайету позировала его жена Бетси.

Впервые картина «Мир Кристины» была выставлена в нью-йоркской Macbeth Gallery в 1948 году. Публика и критики встретили ее прохладно. В конце концов, полотно купил директор Музея современного искусства Альфред Барр. Один из самых узнаваемых живописных шедевров в истории человечества обошелся ему в 1800 долларов.

Прошли десятилетия, прежде чем «Мир Кристины» в англоязычной прессе стали поминать в соседстве с определением «iconic», своеобразные «цитаты» из нее появились в книгах Стивена Кинга и фильмах Роберта Земекиса, а само полотно превратилось в универсальную метафору долгой и тернистой дороги домой.


Wind from the Sea, 1947

Throughout his six-decade-long career, Andrew Wyeth painted lonely rural landscapes, closely observed portraits, and crisp interior still lifes in a characteristically realistic and finely detailed style. His landscapes are almost entirely of locations in the Chadds Ford and Brandywine area of Pennsylvania and in coastal Maine, the places where he grew up and lived all his life. Wyeth's close friends and neighbors, and their homes, were frequently the subjects of his intensely personal paintings. The Olsons—Christina Olson in particular, shown in his most famous painting, Christina's World, 1948 (The Museum of Modern Art, New York)—and their farm were repeatedly depicted by the artist. Wyeth's interior scenes and architectural views often focus on windows and doorways, and Wind from the Sea is one of the artist's earliest paintings of a window. It is a scene from a room on the top floor of the Olson house in Maine, looking over the surrounding landscape.

Wind from the Sea, painted a year before Christina's World, captures a moment on a hot summer day when Wyeth opened the seldom used window in an attic room. The picture is eerily alive with movement as the wind blows the curtains into the room. The tattered, transparent fabric is light and airy, with small embroidered birds along the edges that seem ready to dart into the house. In contrast, the sun-bleached wooden window sill looks sturdy and solid. The interior of the room is dim, while the landscape beyond the open window is stark and bright. The tree-lined view includes no figures, but as in so many other works by Wyeth, a strong sense of their presence is evident. Two well-worn tire tracks running across the dirt lead the viewer's eye toward the sea in the distance. The close vantage point and the tightly cropped window frame at the edge of the painting create the illusion that the viewer is actually looking out a window.

Wind from the Sea is an iconic example of Wyeth's landscapes, as well as one of the earliest examples of his use of windows and his often unique choice of vantage point. Three preparatory studies for the painting accompanied the gift. All four works were bequeathed to the Gallery by Charles H. Morgan. Wind from the Sea is the second painting by Wyeth to enter the National Gallery's collection Snow Flurries, a 1953 tempera painting, was given in 1977.

Provenance

The artist sold January 1948 through (MacBeth Gallery, New York) to Clay Bartlett [1907-1955], Manchester, Vermont[1] sold February 1952 to Charles Hill Morgan [1902-1984], Amherst his estate[2] gift 2009 to NGA.

[1] See the detailed discussion of the painting's provenance in Nancy K. Anderson, "Wind from the Sea: Painting Truth beneath the Facts," in Nancy K. Anderson and Charles Brock, Andrew Wyeth: Looking In, Looking Out, exh. cat., National Gallery of Art, Washington, 2014: 21-22, 179 nn. 37-44.

[2] By terms of Morgan's will, the painting was on loan to the Mead Art Museum, Amherst College, Massachusetts, for 25 years after his death before being given to the NGA.


Andrew Wyeth - History

Andrew Wyeth
Five Decades
Forum Gallery, New York, NY

By DONALD KUSPIT March, 2020

We must reserve a little back-shop, all our own, entirely free, wherein to establish our true liberty and principle retreat and solitude.

I did live my life forward, but sometimes I couldn’t help thinking about the past, and it was rewarding. Nostalgia made me feel that my life had roots and continuity. It made me feel good about myself and my relationships. It provided a texture to my life and gave me strength to move forward.

- Dr. Constantine Sedikidis, Developer of the Southhampton Nostalgia Scale

The past is not dead. In fact, it’s not even past.

Again and again we see solitary, isolated figures in Andrew Wyeth’s works: the clothed and crippled Christina Olsen famously in Christina’s World, 1948, the often infamously naked and sturdy Helga Testorf in many of the 247 works devoted to her Wyeth made between 1971-1985. A caregiver with nursing experience, Wyeth met her when she was caring for his terminally ill close friend Karl Kuerner. And solitary, isolated houses, among them those pictured in Firewood (Study for Groundhog Day), 1959, Lamplight, 1975, House On Stone’s Point, 1977, and East Point Lighthouse, 1991. A house is a symbol of the body, Freud tells us, and Olsen and Testorf are first and foremost bodies, whatever their social situations. The human being, alone yet holding her own, sick almost unto death like Christina yet determined to survive, sometimes seemingly invulnerable like Helga and Wyeth’s stone houses yet marked by time, is the basic subject matter of Wyeth’s work.

For Wyeth the house—the house on the hill towards which Christina crawls as though towards a heavenly home, a visionary mirage with the miraculous power to heal her body and save her soul—epitomizes the fundamental aloneness, helplessness, and hopefulness of human beings. And heroism in the face of adversity, for she holds her own in the empty space, in barren nature—endures despite her mortification. Wyeth admires her will to live despite her despair. Wyeth’s figures epitomize the existential paradox: determined to be independent—to stand or fall alone—they are nonetheless dependent on others—a few friends--for survival. I think Wyeth paints them—they’re all personal friends and neighbors, not anonymous studio models--to help them survive. It is a supportive act of lasting friendship, even an act of love--perhaps an overstatement of Wyeth’s unconscious motivation for painting his insular figures, but his love of art becomes his love for them.

Installation view, Andrew Wyeth, Five Decades, Forum Gallery, New York, NY

Clearly he loves—desires--Helga, embraces her naked body by passionately painting it. Like Pygmalion, he has fallen in love with her image. Art, as is often the case, is substitute gratification for frustrated desire, even as the act of crafting a work of art indicates ego control of instinctive desire. Wyeth pursues Helga relentlessly the way Apollo pursued Daphne, and like Daphne she becomes a force of nature, as Wyeth’s numerous images of her at home in nature suggest. I am arguing, perhaps absurdly, that Wyeth’s analytic attention to his all too human subject matter was motivated by therapeutic concern, which is a form of love. Obsessed with Helga, he immortalizes her by depicting her repeatedly, as though to hold her fast so that she can never leave him, and to care for her as she cares for others. Representing her, he internalizes her, so that she becomes his muse, an inseparable and indispensable part of him, a reliably good object, to use psychoanalytic language, and as such has healing power, as good art has—particularly a good representation of an object, whether human or non-human, a person or an aspect of nature or something man-made and useful, like a house or a boat.

Installation view, Andrew Wyeth, Five Decades, Forum Gallery, New York, NY

Marked by time yet holding their own as though timeless, Wyeth’s aged yet sturdy houses, many of stone, like the lighthouse—what could be more isolated and helpful than a lighthouse, holding its own against the sea and guiding ships to safety—epitomize and symbolize Wyeth’s confident, stoic, caring outlook. His is an existential art: an art about the human condition at its must fundamental--the difference between the life force which is Helga, a force of nature, as In The Orchard, 1974, one of a series of works depicting Helga at various seasons throughout the year, here as a naked wood nymph in Spring, as the spontaneous flourishing of green leaves on a seemingly dead black tree trunk suggests and the death force evident in Teel’s Landing, 1953, a bleak painting with an empty rowboat, a homage acknowledging the death of Rufus Teel, for whom the Maine island was named. Teel died in 1935, and Island Funeral, 1939, a painting by N. C. Wyeth, Andrew Wyeth’s father and only teacher, bears witness to the flotilla of ships that rounded the island in homage to Teel. Andrew’s mournful painting is a homage to his father, who died in 1945, and Teel, as well as a memento mori to a place in the ocean near Cushing, Maine where the Wyeth family summered. The rowboat in Andrew’s painting—in effect an open coffin--and the island in his father’s painting—in effect a burial mound--are as isolated as Andrew’s figures.

Nostalgia informs Teel’s Landing—not only for the past when his father was alive, but for Old Master painting. Wyeth is a New Old Master, not mechanically modelling his art on that of the Old Masters, emulating their skill and technique, but rather, like them, “taking pleasure in slow, disinterested close-up communion with an object,” to quote Paul Valéry, “drawing therefrom a degree of self-knowledge and a sense of collaboration between his intellect, his motive, his vision, and his hand, in relation to a given thing.”(1) This attention to intimate detail, realizing it has a life of its own however much part of the life of the picture—an aspect of an organic whole that has an organic life of its own—is the core of traditional descriptive art. Wyeth is a traditionalist in more ways than one, for he idealizes in the act of memorializing a scene or figure, that is, finds the esthetic core in the commonplace thing, including the human figure.

Installation view, Andrew Wyeth, Five Decades, Forum Gallery, New York, NY

He is also a traditionalist in that he is attuned to nature. His early watercolors, for example Cook’s Wharf, 1940, were strongly influenced by Winslow Homer’s Maine watercolors. Like Homer, Wyeth preferred nature to the city, exiled himself in nature to escape the city, eschewed the urban environment not only because it was “unnatural” but because it was peculiarly inhumane, because people lost their individuality and subjectivity—their uniqueness, their particularity and identity and autonomy--in its crowds, the individuality and subjectivity that Wyeth’s human beings clearly have. Their isolation—separateness--becomes a sign of their integrity and independence, a point made decisively in Wyeth’s Winter, 1946. Like an isolated tree the singular figure holds its own in the dead of winter—and in the vast empty space in which it stands. The youth’s shadow is as black and as old as death, but its eccentric expressive shape suggests that it is uncannily alive, as though with the coming of Spring it will fertilize the barren earth on which it falls, spontaneously turn green as grass, showing that Mother Nature is still alive, fresh with life—like Helga, another catalyst of creativity, another mothering figure.

Wyeth’s traditionalist art prophesizes the end of modernist art at the moment of its American triumph. It was a rejection of modernism at its height—as noted, Christina’s World, Wyeth’s most famous work, was painted in 1948, when the so-called New York School of abstract expressionism was gaining prominence, coming into its seemingly revolutionary own, and crucially, when its advocate Clement Greenberg declared that painting the figure was passé, for all too human content was beside the point of pure art, concerned above all with the material medium, as Greenberg emphasized. He made the point transparently clear when he insisted that Rembrandt’s masterful handling of material paint gave his pictures more meaning and value than their biblical subject matter—it is what made them important visual art rather than literature in visual disguise. For Greenberg, their spiritual purpose was beside the point of their aesthetic purposiveness, which is to sell the meaning of the aesthetic short. As Harold Rosenberg noted, the School of New York elaborated the original ideas of the School of Paris without fundamentally changing them, implying that the American modernists were the epigone of the French modernists, more broadly, European modernists—Kandinsky’s abstract expressionism as well as Picasso’s Cubism. The epigone exaggerates his master’s voice, as the saying goes, suggesting American modernism is a sort of exaggerated European modernism, and with that a peculiarly anti-climactic climax--a dead-end. What else are Pollock’s all-over abstract paintings but the dead-end—reification—of Kandinsky’s all-over abstract paintings?

Wyeth’s works have their modernist aspects—spontaneous gestures, sometimes sweeping, always intimate, appear again and again, standing out of the subject matter they signify, and abstract forms make a visionary appearance, as they do in the snow on the roof of the house in Lamplight, 1975, the house itself a construction of geometrical forms, a square mounted by a triangle and flanked by a rectangle topped with a smaller rectangle—but Wyeth eschews pure art, especially at its formalist (formulaic?) extreme. As much as and more than many modernist painters, he is the master of his medium—he plays paint with the virtuoso brilliance of a Paganini. But he is also a modern humanist, painting figures in settings that make the fundamental aloneness of human beings in a world without God, as Nietzsche famously said, noting that modern science disillusioned us about traditional religion, and thus a world fraught with anxiety about death—the core anxiety of our Age of Anxiety, as W. H. Auden calls it. In a Godless world—more pointedly, in a nature that has lost spiritual meaning, Wyeth’s often raw and desolate nature, always peculiarly alien, even when it comes alive in Spring, and barely inhabitable, as the few houses in it suggest they are as rugged as it is, hold their own in it, but they seem as much a part of it as any hill, seem to grow out of it, become an inseparable part of it—man is alone with his own death, for there is no God to remove its “sting,” as the Bible says God could do. The promise of immortality has become absurd in the modern world, and self-deceptive because there is no soul to be saved, only a body to survive as best it can.

Wyeth is preoccupied with the body, as noted earlier—the body of the house, the body of a person, the body of the earth. In Surf Helga’s naked body rises from the sea like Aphrodite’s, but behind it a wall black and impenetrable and unavoidable as death seems about to crash down on her, and the sea that surrounds her churns wildly as though about to swallow her up (its whiteness rises above her navel): birth and death are inseparable, strangely simultaneous. The love goddess Helga balances them, holds her own between them, a glorious form of life born from the force of nature. The work is a brilliant modern rendering—modern because of its abstract austerity, the dramatic, sharp, abrupt contrast of black and white, symbolizing the unresolvable dialectic and uncanny connection of death and life, and the discreet use of the nude’s brown hair and red nipples to relieve the tension of the contrast while marking it—of an age-old classical theme. Wyeth breathes fresh life into it by giving it profound existential import. He shows that the old myths and the old methods of art making have staying power.

Also, spontaneous gestures and geometrical forms are not so modern, for one can find them in Old Master art, where they served a descriptive as well as aesthetic purpose. They leavened representation since the time art was made in caves, informed images of animal and human figures, giving them expressive resonance and aesthetic presence, and as such not simply matter-of-fact. Pure art—non-objective art--began when Kandinsky denied art’s descriptive purpose and with that dispensed with the figure—a human object. The result was what Jose Ortega y Gasset famously called the dehumanization of art. It gave painting what has been called presentational immediacy—seemingly pure aesthetic purpose as distinct from instrumental representational purpose. Kandinsky separated the subject from the object, dispensing with the latter—observed fact--to elevate the former—personal feeling—as the be-all and end-all of art. As he wrote, the color of Monet’s Haystack was “necessary” not the haystack—the color was impressive, not Monet’s “impression” of the haystack. For Wyeth, this is a betrayal and contraction of art, an inhibition and failure of the imagination, a dubious not to say disastrous Solomonic wisdom, for with the loss of the object—foregoing referencing the object to become self-referential—art became an insular exercise in self-congratulation, not to say grandiosely narcissistic, as so-called all-over abstract painting is.

“What could painting do once it abandoned the traditional language of representation, or moved sufficiently far from its conventional idiom to make it incomprehensible?,” the British historian Eric Hobsbawm asks. “This uncertainty gives the history of the avant-gardes an air of particular desperation. They were constantly torn between the conviction that there could be no future to the art of the past—even to yesterday’s past, or even to any kind of art in the old definition—and the conviction that what they were doing in the old social role of ‘artists’ and ‘geniuses’ was important, and rooted in the great tradition of the past. The Cubists very naturally, but to Marinetti’s great displeasure, ‘adore the traditionalism of Poussin, Ingres and Corot.’ More absurdly, the late Yves Klein, who colored all his canvases and other objects a uniform blue in the manner of a housepainter, may be regarded as the reductio ad absurdum of the artist’s activity, but he justified this by saying that the intention of Giotto and Cimabue had been ‘monochromatic’.”(2)

Wyeth carries that great tradition of the past into modern times, shows that it can be used to convey the existential truth about human life in the modern world—a world in which “the best lack all conviction, while the worst are full of passionate intensity,” as the poet William Butler Yeats said. There is an existential bleakness to Wyeth’s paintings, a poignant emptiness, a fatalistic blackness—the abysmal blackness of the Maine Door, 1970, the stark blackness that surrounds the naked Helga Letting Her Hair Down, 1972, the blackness that seems to consume her breasts and face in Winfields, 1977, the blackness that seems about to engulf her naked luminous body in Surf, 1978. Black and white—harsh black shadow and blinding radiant light—are irreconcilably at odds in many of Wyeth’s works, obviously in Surf, subtly in Lamplight, grimly in Firewood, 1959, insidiously in Frozen Race, 1969, where the small white dog cast a giant black shadow. Fixed in space, he seems petrified by the emptiness he points to—the death that awaits him even as it stalks him from behind. Dare one say that the white has a spiritual intensity, that the black fatal is as death?

Wyeth’s paintings are fraught with unresolved conflict, be it the conflict between the sheltering home and raw nature, more broadly man and nature, as Winter suggests. But woman is invariably one with nature, as she is in the seasonal portraits of Helga, and more subtly in the portrait of Christina. Crawling on the earth, she is close to nature, ironically one with it, a paradoxical nature goddess, for she is of the earth but sterile. Wyeth’s nature is often barren and cold, as the icy pond in The Blonde Study, 1985 and the snow in Pickup Sticks, 1994 suggest, if now and then fertile with life as Helga is in a state of nature. Sometimes nature’s life-giving light and death-dealing darkness seem to seamlessly mix, as in the sand on the beach in Teel’s Landing, at other times they are in turbulent intercourse, as in the sea in Cook’s Wharf, 1940. The shadowy lobsterman that stands on the wharf seems to have emerged from the depths of the sea, a symbol of death, for he catches lobsters to kill and eat them, in contrast to the luminous Aphrodite in Surf, a symbol of life.

Wyeth reminds us that traditional representational art is a resource and sanctuary in troubled modern times, all the more so because modern art has begun to imitate itself, which is to mummify itself, and with that has become decadent. It has become “Alexandrian,” to use Greenberg’s term. “Alexandrianism stands still,” while “the avant-garde moves,”(3) but it no longer moves. Stopped in its tracks, it marches in place. It has lost creative momentum, relying on what Greenberg calls “the varieties of novelty art,” among them “Assemblage, Pop, Environment, Op, Kinetic, Erotic art”—more pointedly “merely odd, incongruous, and socially shocking art”(4)—to convince us that it remains innovative. But such pseudo-avant-garde art does not fundamentally change art and our understanding of it the way genuine avant-garde art does—the way Cubism, Expressionism, Non-Objective Art, and Surrealism have. They are fundamentally creative, unlike novelty art, which is superficially creative, if it is worthy of the word “creative.” Wyeth’s art shows that traditional representational art continues to have genuine creative life in it, which is why it is a necessary inspiration in postmodern times, when much art has become a conceptual wasteland or serves an ideological rather than aesthetic let alone spiritual purpose, and when abstraction is spinning in its grave, a ghostly shadow of the grandeur that it had when it was avant-garde.

Perhaps avant-gardism is a bankrupt idea, an idea that has seen better days, an idea that has become stale, an idea that rings hollow. Avant-garde art increasingly seems like an arrested creative development—Baudelaire’s and Kandinsky’s adulation of children’s art suggests as much (Kandinsky thought that it was better than adult art and Baudelaire thought children’s toys were great works of art)—and pathological, as its appropriation of the art of the insane suggests. Which is why Wyeth’s traditional representational art seems fresh and healthy however subliminally tragic—it shows that tragic apartness can be sublimated into intimate beauty. Restoring continuity with traditional art, and with that repairing the traumatic break with the past that is avant-garde art—once a necessary revolution, acknowledging modernity, but now, in the 21 st century, as standardized, institutionalized, and academic as classical representational art became in the 19 th century (no more a dynamic movement but a static school, it has become another staple of art)--Wyeth makes it clear that the past is the necessary future of art. “Ripeness is all” is the ambitious motto of the mature art of the Great Tradition, as Baudelaire called it, and more difficult to achieve than novelty, and more shocking because more rare. It is why Wyeth’s traditionalist art holds its own against the tide of modern, neo-modern, and postmodern art, becomes a refuge among the ruins of avant-garde art. WM

(1)Paul Valéry, “Degas, Manet, Morisot,” Degas, Manet, Morisot (New York: Pantheon, 1960), 59

(2)Eric Hobsbawm, Behind the Times: The Decline and Fall of the Twentieth Century Avant-Gardes (London: Thames and Hudson, 1998), 24, 25

(3)Clement Greenberg, “Avant-Garde and Kitsch,” Art and Culture, Critical Essays (Boston: Beacon Press, 1965), 8

(4)Clement Greenberg, “Recentness of Sculpture,” Art International, 11 (April 1967):19


Watch the video: How Andrew Wyeth Made A Painting (January 2022).