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Sterling Hayden

Sterling Hayden


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Sterling Hayden was born in Upper Montclair, New Jersey, on 26th March, 1916. After the death of his father his mother remarried and the family moved to Maine where he attended Wassookeag School in Dexter. He dropped out of high school at the age of 16 and took a job as mate on a schooner.

Hayden later skippered a trading schooner in the Caribbean after earning his master's license, and in 1937 he served as mate on a world cruise of the schooner Yankee. The following year he was awarded his first command, skippering the square rigger Florence C. Robinson 7,700 miles from Gloucester, Massachusetts, to Tahiti in 1938.

Hayden, who was 6' 5" (1.96 m) tall was offered work as a model. This led him to be signed by Paramount Pictures. His first film was Virginia (1941). During the making of the film he fell in love with the established English actress, Madeleine Carroll. The couple got married and appeared together in Bahama Passage (1942). Paramount promoted him as the "The Most Beautiful Man in the Movies!"

Madeleine's sister was killed in the Blitz, and she decided to give up acting to work in field hospitals as a Red Cross nurse in Europe. Hayden also wanted to take part in the Second World War and using the pseudonym "John Hamilton" joined the Marines as a private. His abilities were soon recognised and he was recommended for Officer Candidate School. After graduation, he was commissioned a second lieutenant and was transferred to service as an undercover agent under William J. Donovan.

In 1944, as a member of the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) he was involved in supplying partisans in Italy and Yugoslavia. This included those led by Josip Tito. He was awarded the Silver Star for gallantry. The citation claimed he had "displayed great courage in making hazardous sea voyages in enemy-infested waters and reconnaissance through enemy-held areas". Hayden was also parachuted into Croatia and promoted to the rank of captain on 14th February, 1945. Hayden later admitted that during the war he had been "enraptured by the Partisans of Yugoslavia" and had "became exposed to Communist ideology".

Hayden joined the American Communist Party in June, 1946 and became active in left-wing organisations in Hollywood. He left the party after a few months: "What did I care for labor? For racial discrimination? For civil liberties and the war between the classes? Oh, I cared in my own fashion. I cared just enough to embrace these things as props, flailing away night after night at semi-drunken parties.... I'd rather be wrong on my own than be right on somebody else's say-so."

Hayden resumed work as a film actor and appeared in Blaze of Noon(1947), El Paso (1949) and Manhandled (1949). He later recalled: "There's nothing wrong with being an actor, if that's what a man wants. But there's everything wrong with achieving an exalted status simply because one photographs well and is able to handle dialogue.... In the final analysis, an actor is only a pawn - brilliant sometimes, rare and talented, capable of bringing pleasure and even inspiration to others, but no less a pawn for that."

Hayden's breakthrough film came in 1950 when director, John Huston, asked him to appear in The Asphalt Jungle. The film received five Oscar nominations and Bosley Crowther, the film critic for The New York Times, argued: "This film, derived by Ben Maddow and John Huston from Mr. Burnett's book and directed by Mr. Huston in brilliantly naturalistic style, gives such an electrifying picture of the whole vicious circle of a crime... From the very first shot, in which the camera picks up a prowling thug, sliding along between buildings to avoid a police car in the gray and liquid dawn, there is ruthless authority in this picture, the hardness and clarity of steel, and remarkably subtle suggestion that conveys a whole involvement of distorted personality and inveterate crime."

On 8th March, 1951, the Un-American Activities Committee began an "Investigation of Communism in the Entertainment Field". Sterling Hayden appeared on 10th April. Robert Vaughn, the author of Only Victims: A Study of Show Business Blacklisting (1972) has argued that "Hayden... was the first of many who elected to put the continuance of their careers ahead of personal and professional friendships." People named by Hayden included Robert Lees, Karen Morley and Abraham Polonsky. Hayden also said: "One of them was someone named Bernie but I never knew his last name. He was a sort of intellectual type and led the educational discussions." He was talking about the young screenwriter Bernard Gordon who was later named by William Alland.

Hayden later commented in his autobiography, Wanderer (1963): "Not often does a man find himself eulogized for having behaved in a manner that he himself despises. I subscribed to a press-clipping service. They sent me two thousand clips from papers east and west, large and small, and from dozens of magazines. Most had nothing but praise for my one-shot stoolie show. Only a handful - led by The New York Times - denounced this abrogation of constitutional freedoms whereby the stoolie could gain status in a land of frightened people."

Hayden confession allowed him to continue making films. This included The Star (1952), Flaming Feather (1952), Hellgate (1952), Fighter Attack (1953), Kansas Pacific (1953), Naked Alibi (1954), Arrow In the Dust (1954), Johnny Guitar (1954), Suddenly (1954), Top Gun (1955), The Last Command (1955), The Killing (1956), Crime of Passion (1957), Valerie (1957), Gun Battle at Monterey (1957), Zero Hour (1957) and Terror in a Texas Town (1958).

On 22nd November, 1963, President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas. Hayden had severe doubts that Lee Harvey Oswald was the lone gunman and he supported Mark Lane in his attempts to reopen the case and joined the Citizens Committee of Inquiry. Lane pointed out in Plausible Denial: Was the CIA Involved in the Assassination of JFK (1991): "Having almost exhausted the available traditional resources, I turned toward an informal network that had been established years before... I formed an organization... the Citizens Committee of Inquiry. Its purpose, from the time it was founded in 1964, was to bring together people interested in securing the facts about the death of the president. It was clear that an extraordinary response was required to meet the effort of the police and spy organizations to offer a sanitized solution to the murder and to discourage serious inquiry."

Other films that Hayden appeared in included Dr. Strangelove (1964), Hard Contract (1969), Loving (1970), The Godfather (1972), The Long Goodbye (1973), The Final Programme (1973), Deadly Strangers (1974), 1900 (1976), King of the Gypsies (1978), Winter Kills (1979), The Outsider (1980), Nine to Five (1980), Gas (1981) and Venom (1981).

Sterling Hayden died of prostate cancer at his home in Sausalito on 23rd May, 1986.

Not often does a man find himself eulogized for having behaved in a manner that he himself despises. Only a handful - led by The New York Times - denounced this abrogation of constitutional freedoms whereby the stoolie could gain status in a land of frightened people.


The Long Goodbye (film)

The Long Goodbye is a 1973 American neo-noir [2] [3] [4] thriller film directed by Robert Altman and based on Raymond Chandler's 1953 novel. The screenplay was written by Leigh Brackett, who co-wrote the screenplay for Chandler's The Big Sleep in 1946. The film stars Elliott Gould as Philip Marlowe and features Sterling Hayden, Nina Van Pallandt, Jim Bouton (in a rare acting role), Mark Rydell and an early uncredited appearance by Arnold Schwarzenegger.

The story's period was moved from 1949–50 to 1970s Hollywood. The Long Goodbye has been described as "a study of a moral and decent man cast adrift in a selfish, self-obsessed society where lives can be thrown away without a backward glance . and any notions of friendship and loyalty are meaningless." [5]


Suffolk writer portrays life of Hollywood's Sterling Hayden

Suffolk resident Lee Mandel hasn't always been a writer. But with the publication of his third book, "Sterling Hayden's Wars," a well-written and thoroughly researched authorized biography, he more than qualifies.

Mandel, a retired Navy physician and former Western Branch resident, has always been a fan of Sterling Hayden – an actor, author and sailor.

He first saw Hayden perform in the 1954 movie "Suddenly" with Frank Sinatra. Sinatra played a presidential assassin. Hayden portrayed the sheriff of the town where it took place.

"I always thought he was pretty cool," Mandel said. "I also saw a movie called 'The Eternal Sea.' He played a naval aviator, one of the pioneers of carrier-based jet aviation," he said. "It's funny how I ended up as a flight surgeon on aircraft carriers."

Long before he ever thought about being a writer, Mandel was a Navy doctor who specialized in internal and aviation medicine. The New York City native served 9½ years as a Navy doctor before leaving the service. He returned to the Navy 9½ years later and served for another 15 years.

"I loved the Navy. I missed it a lot when I got out," he said. "Sometimes you have to take the detours to realize where you belong."

As a Navy physician, Mandel had a "pretty interesting career." He served on staff at four naval hospitals. Mandel was pulled from the Philadelphia Naval Hospital to serve in the Office of the Attending Physician in the U.S. Congress.

Mandel also served as senior medical officer on three U.S. Navy aircraft carriers – the USS Saratoga, USS Harry S. Truman, and USS George H.W. Bush.

He has always loved history. When he was in college, he was a "typical pre-med nerd."

Ten years ago, when he started his first book – "Moryak: A Novel of the Russian Revolution" – he had no background in writing. In Russian, moryak means "sailor." His first book, a historical fiction piece, was self-published. "Moryak" earned Mandel the grand prize for fiction from the Santa Fe Creative Arts Council.

"The book was pretty good. It got very good reviews," Mandel said. "After three years, I got contacted by a European publisher. They wanted to acquire the rights to the book. That transformed me from a self-published writer to a published writer."

His second book, a biography, was titled "Unlikely Warrior: A Pacifist Rabbi's Journey from the Pulpit to Iwo Jima." Marine Corps chaplain Rabbi Roland Gittelsohn was the subject of this biography.

Mandel's latest biography, "Sterling Hayden's Wars," had its genesis four to five years ago while he was browsing the National Archives website. It announced that the personnel records of several celebrities who were with the Office of Strategic Services during World War II had been released. The OSS was a U.S. intelligence gathering agency.

"One was Sterling Hayden. I didn't know he was in the OSS. I downloaded his file and read it," Mandel said. "It had a narrative that he wrote at the end of his service in the Balkans. It was absolutely fascinating. I didn't know much about World War II in the Balkans."

While Mandel's original intent was to write about Sterling Hayden's exploits in World War II, the guy – Hayden – proved to be so interesting that Mandel just couldn't stop there.

He went on to read Hayden's autobiography "Wanderer." It had been an international best seller. Mandel was hooked. Hayden wrote two books in his life, both of them international best sellers. Hayden's other book was called "Voyage: A Novel of 1896."

Reading both of Hayden's books and reviewing the referenced combat operations was merely the beginning. Mandel drove up to the National Archives in College Park, Md., to get the operations reports. The next thing Mandel knew he had written 170 pages on just Hayden's World War II exploits.

After he had completed the initial manuscript, Mandel wrote a letter to Hayden's widow, Catherine Hayden. She read the manuscript and invited him to come up to Connecticut to speak with her.

"We became very good friends. Kitty is her nickname," Mandel said. "Kitty, their youngest son, David, and I became friends. They shared their memories and all these materials with me."

Hayden arranged for Mandel to be granted access to Sterling Hayden's papers in Boston University's Howard Gotlieb Archival Research Center. She also provided photos – most previously unpublished – for publication in Mandel's biography.

Mandel always recognized that Hayden was a "pretty solid" actor. In some films – "The Asphalt Jungle" and "Dr. Strangelove" – he was brilliant, Mandel said.

"One thing that surprised me about Sterling Hayden was what a multi-faceted, talented guy he was," Mandel said. "I never knew he could write so well. He should've been a writer, but he didn't publish his first book "Wanderer" until he was 47.

"Hayden was also one of the greatest sailors. He didn't use radios. He felt he didn't need them."


Wanderer

This is an outstanding memoir. True, honest, up front. perfectly salty and a bit rough but that&aposs part of the allure since it gets into the persona of the author. Better yet, here is a story about Mr. Hayden and Wanderer:

Years ago, I was given a short passage (page 24) from this book. It speaks to not going through life saying/feeling "I wish I could. " and not looking back in life with "could have, would have, should have." It starts with, "Little has been said or written about the ways a m This is an outstanding memoir. True, honest, up front. perfectly salty and a bit rough but that's part of the allure since it gets into the persona of the author. Better yet, here is a story about Mr. Hayden and Wanderer:

Years ago, I was given a short passage (page 24) from this book. It speaks to not going through life saying/feeling "I wish I could. " and not looking back in life with "could have, would have, should have." It starts with, "Little has been said or written about the ways a man may blast himself free."

At that time, I was fixing on going on a sojourn abroad and this passage pretty much pushed me to pursue my idea. So I left. What I thought was going to be six or eight months turned into five years. I went to France. Then to Italy. During the summers I was the chef on a private yacht for an Italian family.

Years after my return, I finally decided to read Wanderer. One night, after one of those "I don't want to do this anymore" work days, I was reading a chapter that's deep into the story. only to learn Mr. Hayden, sixty-five years earlier- was the original captain on the exact yacht I worked on!

If that wasn't a testiment for "glad I did it" with a full-circle conclusion I'd be hard pressed to argue the point.

I enjoyed this read a while back more than I expected, and the fact that I&aposm adding my thoughts now is probably testament to its odd haunting power. Actor Sterling Hayden, best known (to me) as Gen. Jack Ripper in Kubrick&aposs classic Dr. Strangelove, put all he had into this memoir of his lifelong wanderings aboard various sea vessels he obtained at any and all cost whenever the world became too much for him.

Hayden never felt comfortable in his skin as a hunky actor, and some of the best passages I enjoyed this read a while back more than I expected, and the fact that I'm adding my thoughts now is probably testament to its odd haunting power. Actor Sterling Hayden, best known (to me) as Gen. Jack Ripper in Kubrick's classic Dr. Strangelove, put all he had into this memoir of his lifelong wanderings aboard various sea vessels he obtained at any and all cost whenever the world became too much for him.

Hayden never felt comfortable in his skin as a hunky actor, and some of the best passages come when he comments on the fast-paced world of Hollywood and mid-century America in general. Another great section follows his exploits during WW2 as an OSS agent named John Hamilton running guns to Yugoslav partisans, a bold and heroic effort he surprisingly plays down—and I would like to know more about. He doesn't always come off so well. He sold out friends who had dabbled in communist/socialist circles to the House Un-American Activities Committee, and later, defying a court order, basically absconded with his children on a sailing boat in one famously irresponsible incident. But Hayden owns up to all his flaws and to the society that formed him. Some brief passages are downright poetic. For me, this beats On the Road for its criticism of a culture of the sheep and the Man, a troubled cry from the dark side of 1950s America. . more

“Shortly after midnight she came to the end of the road and, with Venus Point Light bearing due south, three miles distant, we hove her to till dawn. And the ship slept under a blanket of stars and so did most of her crew. But not the one in command. He paced alone, alone and lost in memories of the time…” Wanderer, page 247.

Hayden wrote The Wanderer (1963) and then Voyage (1976). Both books read like Conrad and Melville with Hayden living the life of an adventurer before and after Hollywood. He “Shortly after midnight she came to the end of the road and, with Venus Point Light bearing due south, three miles distant, we hove her to till dawn. And the ship slept under a blanket of stars and so did most of her crew. But not the one in command. He paced alone, alone and lost in memories of the time…” Wanderer, page 247.

Hayden wrote The Wanderer (1963) and then Voyage (1976). Both books read like Conrad and Melville with Hayden living the life of an adventurer before and after Hollywood. He is both Melville and a character from Melville. Hayden ran away from home at fifteen to sail the Great Banks of Newfoundland: sailed around the world the first time at twenty-one, captained a square-rigger from Gloucester to Tahiti at twenty-two, and he was the navigator for the schooner Gertrude L. Thebaud in the Fisherman’s Cup the following year. News coverage of the race had led to Hollywood calling the sailor west, but he refused initially. He would sail around the world a second time before he reported to Paramount Studios in 1941. He married and seemed to settle down to a staid but secure income and life. Paramount awarded him a seven-year contract starting at $250 a week, which was very good money then. He would break his contract in less than a year. He felt the wind and left the shore. Wanderer.

Hayden was not a man easy to miss in the crowd: at six-five, with rugged good looks that earned him the moniker “The Beautiful Blond Viking God,” he managed to enlist in the U.S. Marine Corps, see action, earn both the Silver Star and Bronze Star and other combat decorations, get on a first-name basis with “Wild Bill” Donovan of the OSS, precursor to the CIA, and run numerous covert gun-running and rescue operations into Yugoslavia before it had become known that he was some two-bit actor from Hollywood. In other words, Hayden had enlisted using a false name. He had dined with FDR as John Hamilton. That’s acting. Hayden’s missions for the nascent CIA were not declassified until 2008.

Hayden was an interesting man. As an author he, like another actor who loved the sea, Humphrey Bogart, knew his Conrad, London, Melville, and Stevenson inside and out. Wanderer, in typical Haydenesque style, began as an open act of defiance. Defying a court order, he took his four children and sailed for the South Seas. He set sail with no radio. Wanderer is not a celebrity rendition of life on the lam with all the posh accoutrements it is literary fiction drawn from living the hard life at sea with children and Hayden demonstrates the breadth of his maritime knowledge and the depth of his reading, for the book opens with a pivotal incipit from Walter de la Mare. Substitute Wanderer for ‘Traveler’ and you see Sterling Hayden, the author and man, who loved his children and the sea. He was both Ishmael and Ahab. . more


Sterling Hayden

Sterling Walter Hayden (born Sterling Relyea Walter March 26, 1916 – May 23, 1986) was an American actor and author. For most of his career as a leading man, he specialized in westerns and film noir, such as Johnny Guitar, The Asphalt Jungle and The Killing. Later on he became noted as a character actor for such roles as Gen. Jack D. Ripper in Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964). He also played the Irish-American policeman, Captain McCluskey, in Francis Ford Coppola's The Godfather in 1972, and the novelist Roger Wade in 1973's The Long Goodbye. He played the role of Leo Dalcò in Bernardo Bertolucci's 1900 in 1976. At six feet five inches (196 cm), he was taller than most actors.

He was born in Montclair, New Jersey, to George and Frances Walter, who named him Sterling Relyea Walter. After his father died, he was adopted at the age of nine by James Hayden and renamed Sterling Walter Hayden. He grew up in coastal towns of New England, and as a child lived in New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Washington, D.C., and Maine, where he attended Wassookeag School in Dexter, Maine.

Hayden was a genuine adventurer and man of action, not dissimilar from many of his movie parts. He dropped out of high school at the age of 16 and took a job as mate on a schooner. His first voyage was to Newport Beach, California from New London, Connecticut. Later, he was a fisherman on the Grand Banks of Newfoundland, ran a charter yacht, and served as a fireman on eleven trips to Cuba aboard a steamer. He skippered a trading schooner in the Caribbean after earning his master's license, and in 1937 he served as mate on a world cruise of the schooner Yankee. After serving as sailor and fireman on larger vessels and sailing around the world several times, he was awarded his first command aged 22, skippering the square rigger Florence C. Robinson 7,700 miles from Gloucester, Massachusetts, to Tahiti in 1938.

Hollywood years and military service

Hayden became a print model and later signed a contract with Paramount Pictures, who dubbed the 6' 5" (1.96 m) actor "The Most Beautiful Man in the Movies" and "The Beautiful Blond Viking God". His first film, Virginia (1941), starred Madeleine Carroll, with whom he fell in love and married.

After two film roles, he left Hollywood and joined the Marines as a private, under the name "John Hamilton" (a pseudonym Hayden only used in the military). While at Parris Island he was recommended for Officer Candidate School. After graduation, he was commissioned a second lieutenant and was transferred to service as an undercover agent with William J. Donovan's COI office. He remained there after it became the OSS.

As OSS agent John Hamilton, his World War II service included sailing with supplies from Italy to Yugoslav partisans and parachuting into fascist Croatia. Hayden, who also participated in the Naples-Foggia campaign and established air crew rescue teams in enemy-occupied territory, became a first lieutenant on September 13, 1944, and a captain on February 14, 1945. He received the Silver Star (for gallantry in action in the Balkans and Mediterranean "Lt. Hamilton displayed great courage in making hazardous sea voyages in enemy-infested waters and reconnaissance through enemy-held areas"), a Bronze Arrowhead device for parachuting behind enemy lines, and a commendation from Yugoslavia's Marshal Tito. He left active duty on December 24, 1945.

His great admiration for the bravery of the Communist partisans led to a brief membership in the Communist Party. He was apparently active in supporting an effort by the Communist-controlled motion picture painters' union to absorb other film industry unions. As the Red Scare deepened in U.S., he cooperated with the House Un-American Activities Committee, confessing his brief Communist ties and "naming names." His wife at that time, Betty de Noon, insisted that the 'names' her ex-husband provided were already in the hands of the Committee, which had a copy of the Communist Party's membership list. In any event, Hayden subsequently repudiated his cooperation with the Committee, stating in his autobiography "I don't think you have the foggiest notion of the contempt I have had for myself since the day I did that thing."

Sterling Hayden often professed distaste for film acting, claiming he did it mainly to pay for his ships and voyages. In 1958, after a bitter divorce, he was awarded custody of his children. He defied a court order and sailed to Tahiti with all four children, Christian, Dana, Gretchen and Matthew. The crew sailed from San Francisco Bay to Tahiti, where Hayden had planned to film a movie. Hayden also invited well known photographer Dody Weston Thompson along to document the trip and to help shoot location choices. Her South Seas folio is replete with fascinating photographs of the Hayden's ship The Wanderer, on-deck photos of life aboard the ship, colorful prints of his children, Tahitian women and children, and of unique artifacts on shore. The film did not materialize, however, and according to Dody's notes U.S. Camera printed these photographs of paradise in 1961.

Marin County Superior Court Judge Harold Haley would later order Hayden to repay Republic Pictures, who financed the trip with two promissory notes, nearly $50,000 for defaulting on an agreement to repay the debt. In 1960, he married Catherine Devine McConnell. They had two sons, Andrew and David, and were married until his death in 1986. McConnell also had a son from her first marriage, to journalist Scott McConnell.

In the early 1960s, Hayden rented one of the pilot houses of the retired ferryboat Berkeley, docked in Sausalito, California where he resided while writing his autobiography Wanderer, which was first published in 1963. In it, he reminisces about turning points in his life:

"The sun beats down and you pace, you pace and you pace. Your mind flies free and you see yourself as an actor, condemned to a treadmill wherein men and women conspire to breathe life into a screenplay that allegedly depicts life as it was in the old wild West. You see yourself coming awake any one of a thousand mornings between the spring of 1954, and that of 1958 ‑ alone in a double bed in a big white house deep in suburban Sherman Oaks, not far from Hollywood. "The windows are open wide, and beyond these is the backyard swimming pool inert and green, within a picket fence. You turn and gaze at a pair of desks not far from the double bed. This is your private office, the place that shelters your fondest hopes: these desks so neat, patiently waiting for the day that never comes, the day you'll sit down at last and begin to write."Why did you never write? Why, instead, did you grovel along, through the endless months and years, as a motion‑picture actor? What held you to it, to something you so vehemently professed to despise? Could it be that you secretly liked it—that the big dough and the big house and the high life meant more than the aura you spun for those around you to see? "'Hayden's wild,' they said. 'He's kind of nuts𠄛ut you've got to hand it to him. He doesn't give a damn about the loot or the stardom or things like that—something to do with his seafaring, or maybe what he went through in the war . . .'"

In the 1970s, after his appearance in The Godfather, he appeared several times on NBC's Tomorrow Show with Tom Snyder, where he talked about his career resurgence and how it had funded his travels and adventures around the world. Hayden bought a canal barge in the Netherlands in 1969, eventually moving it to the heart of Paris and living on it part of the time. He also shared a home in Wilton, Connecticut with his family and had an apartment in Sausalito.

Hayden wrote two acclaimed books: an autobiography, Wanderer (1962), and a novel Voyage (1976).

Sterling Hayden died of prostate cancer in Sausalito in 1986, age 70.

Wanderer. New York: Knopf. 1963. ISBN 1-57409-048-8.

Voyage: A Novel of 1896. New York: Putnam. 1976. ISBN 0-399-11665-6.

References in Popular Culture

In the film Three Days of the Condor (Sydney Pollack, 1975), two veteran CIA officers were reminiscing about their past. Higgins (Cliff Robertson) asked Mr. Wabash, "You served with Col. Donovan in the OSS, didn't you, sir?" Wabash (John Houseman) replies, "I sailed the Adriatic with a movie star at the helm. It doesn't seem like much of a war now, but it was."

In 2011 the American singer-songwriter Tom Russell released the song "Sterling Hayden" on his album Mesabi.

Hayden, under his nom de guerre Lieutenant John Hamilton, and his role as an OSS agent play a secondary part in the 2012 novel Deaths Door: A Billy Boyle World War II mystery by author James R. Benn. Hayden/Hamilton assists in getting protagonist Billy Boyle through German-occupied Italy.

STERLING HAYDEN AKA: John Hamilton Stirling Hayden Sterling Relyea Walter Born: 1916-03-26 Birth place: Montclair, New Jersey, USA Death: 1986-05-23 Death cause: prostate cancer Nationality: United States Profession: model, actor, seaman, author

Biography A handsome, virile star of the late 1940s and 50s, Sterling Hayden spent several years at sea before signing with Paramount in 1940, appearing in two films with future wife Madeleine Carroll. Variously touted by the studio publicity machine as "The Most Beautiful Man in Movies" or "The Beautiful Blond Viking God", the actor broke his contract in 1941 to join the Marines. During WWII, he assisted the Yugoslavian partisans fight against the Germans and briefly joined the Communist Party in 1946 (resigning after six months) before resuming his acting career the following year. Shortly after his superb performance in "The Asphalt Jungle" (1950), Hayden was gray-listed and was unable to work in Hollywood for six months. He then privately called on the FBI to make a statement concerning his former Communist affiliations, but was subpoenaed by HUAC in 1951 and obliged to testify in public, naming his fellow believers. Hayden was then allowed to continue working, though he expressed his guilt over having "named names" in his 1966 autobiography, "Wanderer". Ironically, in Stanley Kubrick's classic comedy "Dr. Strangelove" (1963), Hayden played the deranged General Jack D. Ripper, whose over-zealous desire to stop the "communist threat" sets World War III in motion. Among his other memorable roles were the corrupt police captain in "The Godfather" (1972) and the chairman of the board in the comedy "9 to 5" (1980). He rounded out his career portraying John Brown in the CBS Civil War miniseries "The Blue and the Gray" (1982).

Family FATHER: George Walter. Died in 1925. MOTHER: Frances Walter. STEP-FATHER: James Hayden. Adopted Sterling. SON: Christian Winslow Hayden. Born in August 1948 mother Betty de Noon. SON: Dana Morgan Hayden. Born in June 1949 mother, Betty de Noon. DAUGHTER: Gretchen Belle Hayden. Born in September 1950 mother, Betty de Noon. SON: Matthew Grant Hayden. Born in July 1952 mother, Betty de Noon. SON: Andrew Hayden. Born in February 1961 mother, Catherine D McConnell. SON: David Hayden. Born in September 1962 1961 mother, Catherine D McConnell.

Companion WIFE: Madeleine Carroll. Actor. Married in 1942 divorced in 1946. WIFE: Betty de Noon. Was married and divorced three times between 1947 and 1958 mother of four of Hayden's children WIFE: Catherine Devine McConnell. Married from 1960 until his death: mother of Hayden's two younger children.

Milestone Raised in New England and the Washington, DC, area At age 17, ran away from home and became a ship's mate, seaman and fireman on various vessels 1940: Signed to a film contract by Paramount Pictures billed as "The Most Beautiful Man in Movies" 1941: Film acting debut in "Virginia" 1941: Left performing to join the Marines used pseudonym John Hamilton During WWII, assisted Yugoslavian partisans by running guns through a German blockade briefly flirted with joining the Communist Party 1947: Returned to film acting in "Variety Girl" and "Blaze of Noon" 1950: Co-starred in "The Asphalt Jungle" During 1950s "Red Scare", cooperated with House UnAmerican Activities Committee 1954: Acted in "Johnny Guitar" 1956: Co-starred in "The Killing" 1960: Played title role in CBS adaptation of "Ethan Frome" 1964: Cast by Stanley Kubrick as General Ripper in "Dr. Strangelove, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb" 1972: Portrayed the brutal, corrupt police captain in "The Godfather" 1973: Appeared in "The Long Goodbye" 1976: Co-starred in "1900" 1978: Had featured role as one of the monarchs in "King of the Gypsies" 1980: Played the chairman of the board in a cameo appearance in "9 to 5" 1982: Final film, "Venom" 1982: Last TV acting role as John Brown in the Civil War drama "The Blue and the Gray"

Education Brown-Nichols School - Cambridge , Massachusetts Wassookaeg School - Dexter , Maine - prep school

Bibliography "Wanderer" Sterling Hayden 1966 "Voyage" Sterling Hayden 1976

Citizenship United States

Notes Hayden was reportedly offered the role of Quint, the sea captain, in "Jaws" but had to decline the role because of a problem with the IRS.


Sterling Hayden

Sterling Walter Hayden (born Sterling Relyea Walter March 26, 1916 – May 23, 1986) was an American actor and author. For most of his career as a leading man, he specialized in westerns and film noir, such as Johnny Guitar, The Asphalt Jungle and The Killing. Later on he became noted as a character actor for such roles as Gen. Jack D. Ripper in Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964). He also played the Irish-American policeman, Captain McCluskey, in Francis Ford Coppola's The Godfather in 1972, and the novelist Roger Wade in 1973's The Long Goodbye. He played the role of Leo Dalcò in Bernardo Bertolucci's 1900 in 1976. At six feet five inches (196 cm), he was taller than most actors.

He was born in Montclair, New Jersey, to George and Frances Walter, who named him Sterling Relyea Walter. After his father died, he was adopted at the age of nine by James Hayden and renamed Sterling Walter Hayden. He grew up in coastal towns of New England, and as a child lived in New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Washington, D.C., and Maine, where he attended Wassookeag School in Dexter, Maine.

Hayden was a genuine adventurer and man of action, not dissimilar from many of his movie parts. He dropped out of high school at the age of 16 and took a job as mate on a schooner. His first voyage was to Newport Beach, California from New London, Connecticut. Later, he was a fisherman on the Grand Banks of Newfoundland, ran a charter yacht, and served as a fireman on eleven trips to Cuba aboard a steamer. He skippered a trading schooner in the Caribbean after earning his master's license, and in 1937 he served as mate on a world cruise of the schooner Yankee. After serving as sailor and fireman on larger vessels and sailing around the world several times, he was awarded his first command aged 22, skippering the square rigger Florence C. Robinson 7,700 miles from Gloucester, Massachusetts, to Tahiti in 1938.

Hollywood years and military service

Hayden became a print model and later signed a contract with Paramount Pictures, who dubbed the 6' 5" (1.96 m) actor "The Most Beautiful Man in the Movies" and "The Beautiful Blond Viking God". His first film, Virginia (1941), starred Madeleine Carroll, with whom he fell in love and married.

After two film roles, he left Hollywood and joined the Marines as a private, under the name "John Hamilton" (a pseudonym Hayden only used in the military). While at Parris Island he was recommended for Officer Candidate School. After graduation, he was commissioned a second lieutenant and was transferred to service as an undercover agent with William J. Donovan's COI office. He remained there after it became the OSS.

As OSS agent John Hamilton, his World War II service included sailing with supplies from Italy to Yugoslav partisans and parachuting into fascist Croatia. Hayden, who also participated in the Naples-Foggia campaign and established air crew rescue teams in enemy-occupied territory, became a first lieutenant on September 13, 1944, and a captain on February 14, 1945. He received the Silver Star (for gallantry in action in the Balkans and Mediterranean "Lt. Hamilton displayed great courage in making hazardous sea voyages in enemy-infested waters and reconnaissance through enemy-held areas"), a Bronze Arrowhead device for parachuting behind enemy lines, and a commendation from Yugoslavia's Marshal Tito. He left active duty on December 24, 1945.

His great admiration for the bravery of the Communist partisans led to a brief membership in the Communist Party. He was apparently active in supporting an effort by the Communist-controlled motion picture painters' union to absorb other film industry unions. As the Red Scare deepened in U.S., he cooperated with the House Un-American Activities Committee, confessing his brief Communist ties and "naming names." His wife at that time, Betty de Noon, insisted that the 'names' her ex-husband provided were already in the hands of the Committee, which had a copy of the Communist Party's membership list. In any event, Hayden subsequently repudiated his cooperation with the Committee, stating in his autobiography "I don't think you have the foggiest notion of the contempt I have had for myself since the day I did that thing."

Sterling Hayden often professed distaste for film acting, claiming he did it mainly to pay for his ships and voyages. In 1958, after a bitter divorce, he was awarded custody of his children. He defied a court order and sailed to Tahiti with all four children, Christian, Dana, Gretchen and Matthew. The crew sailed from San Francisco Bay to Tahiti, where Hayden had planned to film a movie. Hayden also invited well known photographer Dody Weston Thompson along to document the trip and to help shoot location choices. Her South Seas folio is replete with fascinating photographs of the Hayden's ship The Wanderer, on-deck photos of life aboard the ship, colorful prints of his children, Tahitian women and children, and of unique artifacts on shore. The film did not materialize, however, and according to Dody's notes U.S. Camera printed these photographs of paradise in 1961.

Marin County Superior Court Judge Harold Haley would later order Hayden to repay Republic Pictures, who financed the trip with two promissory notes, nearly $50,000 for defaulting on an agreement to repay the debt. In 1960, he married Catherine Devine McConnell. They had two sons, Andrew and David, and were married until his death in 1986. McConnell also had a son from her first marriage, to journalist Scott McConnell.

In the early 1960s, Hayden rented one of the pilot houses of the retired ferryboat Berkeley, docked in Sausalito, California where he resided while writing his autobiography Wanderer, which was first published in 1963. In it, he reminisces about turning points in his life:

"The sun beats down and you pace, you pace and you pace. Your mind flies free and you see yourself as an actor, condemned to a treadmill wherein men and women conspire to breathe life into a screenplay that allegedly depicts life as it was in the old wild West. You see yourself coming awake any one of a thousand mornings between the spring of 1954, and that of 1958 ‑ alone in a double bed in a big white house deep in suburban Sherman Oaks, not far from Hollywood. "The windows are open wide, and beyond these is the backyard swimming pool inert and green, within a picket fence. You turn and gaze at a pair of desks not far from the double bed. This is your private office, the place that shelters your fondest hopes: these desks so neat, patiently waiting for the day that never comes, the day you'll sit down at last and begin to write."Why did you never write? Why, instead, did you grovel along, through the endless months and years, as a motion‑picture actor? What held you to it, to something you so vehemently professed to despise? Could it be that you secretly liked it—that the big dough and the big house and the high life meant more than the aura you spun for those around you to see? "'Hayden's wild,' they said. 'He's kind of nuts𠄛ut you've got to hand it to him. He doesn't give a damn about the loot or the stardom or things like that—something to do with his seafaring, or maybe what he went through in the war . . .'"

In the 1970s, after his appearance in The Godfather, he appeared several times on NBC's Tomorrow Show with Tom Snyder, where he talked about his career resurgence and how it had funded his travels and adventures around the world. Hayden bought a canal barge in the Netherlands in 1969, eventually moving it to the heart of Paris and living on it part of the time. He also shared a home in Wilton, Connecticut with his family and had an apartment in Sausalito.

Hayden wrote two acclaimed books: an autobiography, Wanderer (1962), and a novel Voyage (1976).

Sterling Hayden died of prostate cancer in Sausalito in 1986, age 70.

Wanderer. New York: Knopf. 1963. ISBN 1-57409-048-8.

Voyage: A Novel of 1896. New York: Putnam. 1976. ISBN 0-399-11665-6.

References in Popular Culture

In the film Three Days of the Condor (Sydney Pollack, 1975), two veteran CIA officers were reminiscing about their past. Higgins (Cliff Robertson) asked Mr. Wabash, "You served with Col. Donovan in the OSS, didn't you, sir?" Wabash (John Houseman) replies, "I sailed the Adriatic with a movie star at the helm. It doesn't seem like much of a war now, but it was."

In 2011 the American singer-songwriter Tom Russell released the song "Sterling Hayden" on his album Mesabi.

Hayden, under his nom de guerre Lieutenant John Hamilton, and his role as an OSS agent play a secondary part in the 2012 novel Deaths Door: A Billy Boyle World War II mystery by author James R. Benn. Hayden/Hamilton assists in getting protagonist Billy Boyle through German-occupied Italy.

STERLING HAYDEN AKA: John Hamilton Stirling Hayden Sterling Relyea Walter Born: 1916-03-26 Birth place: Montclair, New Jersey, USA Death: 1986-05-23 Death cause: prostate cancer Nationality: United States Profession: model, actor, seaman, author

Biography A handsome, virile star of the late 1940s and 50s, Sterling Hayden spent several years at sea before signing with Paramount in 1940, appearing in two films with future wife Madeleine Carroll. Variously touted by the studio publicity machine as "The Most Beautiful Man in Movies" or "The Beautiful Blond Viking God", the actor broke his contract in 1941 to join the Marines. During WWII, he assisted the Yugoslavian partisans fight against the Germans and briefly joined the Communist Party in 1946 (resigning after six months) before resuming his acting career the following year. Shortly after his superb performance in "The Asphalt Jungle" (1950), Hayden was gray-listed and was unable to work in Hollywood for six months. He then privately called on the FBI to make a statement concerning his former Communist affiliations, but was subpoenaed by HUAC in 1951 and obliged to testify in public, naming his fellow believers. Hayden was then allowed to continue working, though he expressed his guilt over having "named names" in his 1966 autobiography, "Wanderer". Ironically, in Stanley Kubrick's classic comedy "Dr. Strangelove" (1963), Hayden played the deranged General Jack D. Ripper, whose over-zealous desire to stop the "communist threat" sets World War III in motion. Among his other memorable roles were the corrupt police captain in "The Godfather" (1972) and the chairman of the board in the comedy "9 to 5" (1980). He rounded out his career portraying John Brown in the CBS Civil War miniseries "The Blue and the Gray" (1982).

Family FATHER: George Walter. Died in 1925. MOTHER: Frances Walter. STEP-FATHER: James Hayden. Adopted Sterling. SON: Christian Winslow Hayden. Born in August 1948 mother Betty de Noon. SON: Dana Morgan Hayden. Born in June 1949 mother, Betty de Noon. DAUGHTER: Gretchen Belle Hayden. Born in September 1950 mother, Betty de Noon. SON: Matthew Grant Hayden. Born in July 1952 mother, Betty de Noon. SON: Andrew Hayden. Born in February 1961 mother, Catherine D McConnell. SON: David Hayden. Born in September 1962 1961 mother, Catherine D McConnell.

Companion WIFE: Madeleine Carroll. Actor. Married in 1942 divorced in 1946. WIFE: Betty de Noon. Was married and divorced three times between 1947 and 1958 mother of four of Hayden's children WIFE: Catherine Devine McConnell. Married from 1960 until his death: mother of Hayden's two younger children.

Milestone Raised in New England and the Washington, DC, area At age 17, ran away from home and became a ship's mate, seaman and fireman on various vessels 1940: Signed to a film contract by Paramount Pictures billed as "The Most Beautiful Man in Movies" 1941: Film acting debut in "Virginia" 1941: Left performing to join the Marines used pseudonym John Hamilton During WWII, assisted Yugoslavian partisans by running guns through a German blockade briefly flirted with joining the Communist Party 1947: Returned to film acting in "Variety Girl" and "Blaze of Noon" 1950: Co-starred in "The Asphalt Jungle" During 1950s "Red Scare", cooperated with House UnAmerican Activities Committee 1954: Acted in "Johnny Guitar" 1956: Co-starred in "The Killing" 1960: Played title role in CBS adaptation of "Ethan Frome" 1964: Cast by Stanley Kubrick as General Ripper in "Dr. Strangelove, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb" 1972: Portrayed the brutal, corrupt police captain in "The Godfather" 1973: Appeared in "The Long Goodbye" 1976: Co-starred in "1900" 1978: Had featured role as one of the monarchs in "King of the Gypsies" 1980: Played the chairman of the board in a cameo appearance in "9 to 5" 1982: Final film, "Venom" 1982: Last TV acting role as John Brown in the Civil War drama "The Blue and the Gray"

Education Brown-Nichols School - Cambridge , Massachusetts Wassookaeg School - Dexter , Maine - prep school

Bibliography "Wanderer" Sterling Hayden 1966 "Voyage" Sterling Hayden 1976

Citizenship United States

Notes Hayden was reportedly offered the role of Quint, the sea captain, in "Jaws" but had to decline the role because of a problem with the IRS.


Sterling Hayden > Quotes

&ldquoTo be truly challenging, a voyage, like a life, must rest on a firm foundation of financial unrest. Otherwise, you are doomed to a routine traverse, the kind known to yachtsmen who play with their boats at sea. "cruising" it is called. Voyaging belongs to seamen, and to the wanderers of the world who cannot, or will not, fit in. If you are contemplating a voyage and you have the means, abandon the venture until your fortunes change. Only then will you know what the sea is all about.

"I've always wanted to sail to the south seas, but I can't afford it." What these men can't afford is not to go. They are enmeshed in the cancerous discipline of "security." And in the worship of security we fling our lives beneath the wheels of routine - and before we know it our lives are gone.

What does a man need - really need? A few pounds of food each day, heat and shelter, six feet to lie down in - and some form of working activity that will yield a sense of accomplishment. That's all - in the material sense, and we know it. But we are brainwashed by our economic system until we end up in a tomb beneath a pyramid of time payments, mortgages, preposterous gadgetry, playthings that divert our attention for the sheer idiocy of the charade.

The years thunder by, The dreams of youth grow dim where they lie caked in dust on the shelves of patience. Before we know it, the tomb is sealed.

Where, then, lies the answer? In choice. Which shall it be: bankruptcy of purse or bankruptcy of life? &rdquo
― Sterling Hayden, Wanderer


Sterling Hayden American Actor

Sterling Hayden was previously married to Catherine Devine McConnell (1960 - 1986) , Betty De Noon (1956 - 1958) and Madeleine Carroll (1942 - 1946) .

Sterling Hayden was in relationships with Joanne Dru (1958 - 1959) , Karin Booth (1941) , Patricia Morison (1941 - 1942) and Yvonne De Carlo.

Sterling Hayden had an encounter with Shelley Winters (1954 - 1955) .

About

American Actor Sterling Hayden was born Sterling Relyea Walter on 26th March, 1916 in Montclair, New Jersey, United States and passed away on 23rd May 1986 Sausalito, California, United States aged 70. He is most remembered for Dix Handley In The Asphalt Jungle (1950), Brigadier General Jack D. Ripper In Dr. Strangelove (1964).. His zodiac sign is Aries.

Sterling Hayden was in 2 on-screen matchups, including Jane Wyman in So Big (1953) and Madeleine Carroll in Bahama Passage (1941) .

Sterling Hayden is a member of the following lists: Actors from New Jersey, Cancer deaths in California and American actors.

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Relationship Statistics

TypeTotalLongestAverageShortest
Dating4 10 months, 6 days 3 months, 1 day 1 month
Married3 27 years, 4 months 15 years, 5 months 6 years, 4 months
Encounter1 1 year - -
Total8 27 years, 4 months 6 years 1 month

Details

First Name Sterling
Last Name Hayden
Full Name at Birth Sterling Relyea Walter
Age 70 (age at death) years
Birthday 26th March, 1916
Birthplace Montclair, New Jersey, United States
Died 23rd May, 1986
Place of Death Sausalito, California, United States
Cause of Death Prostate Cancer
Buried Cremated, Ashes scattered at sea
Height 6' 5" (196 cm)
Build Average
Hair Color Grey
Zodiac Sign Aries
Ethnicity White
Nationality American
High School Dropped Out
Occupation Text Actor, Author, Sailor, Model, Marine, OSS Agent.
Occupation Actor
Claim to Fame Dix Handley In The Asphalt Jungle (1950), Brigadier General Jack D. Ripper In Dr. Strangelove (1964).
Year(s) Active 1941󈞾, 1941�
Father George
Mother Frances Walter

Sterling Walter Hayden (born Sterling Relyea Walter March 26, 1916 – May 23, 1986) was an American actor, author, sailor and decorated Marine Corps officer and OSS agent (from services during World War II). A leading man for most of his career, he specialized in westerns and film noir throughout the 1950s, in films such as John Huston's The Asphalt Jungle (1950), Nicholas Ray's Johnny Guitar (1954), and Stanley Kubrick's The Killing (1956). He became noted for supporting roles in the 1960s, perhaps most memorably as General Jack D. Ripper in Kubrick's Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964).


AMERICAN SILVER PLATE MARKSMARKS AND HALLMARKS OF USA AND CANADASILVERPLATE AND ELECTROPLATED SILVER MAKERS

The two common forms of plated silver are Sheffield plate and silverplate/electroplate.
Sheffield Plate is a cheaper substitute for sterling, produced by fusing sheets of silver to the top and bottom of a sheet of copper or base metal. This 'silver sandwich' was then worked into finished pieces. At first it was only put on one side and later was on top and bottom.
Modern electroplating was invented by Italian chemist Luigi V. Brugnatelli in 1805. Brugnatelli used his colleague Alessandro Volta's invention of five years earlier, the voltaic pile, to facilitate the first electrodeposition. Unfortunately, Brugnatelli's inventions were repressed by the French Academy of Sciences and did not become used in general industry for the following thirty years.
Silver plate or electroplate is formed when a thin layer of pure or sterling silver is deposited electrolytically on the surface of a base metal. By 1839, scientists in Britain and Russia had independently devised metal deposition processes similar to Brugnatelli's for the copper electroplating of printing press plates.
Soon after, John Wright of Birmingham, England, discovered that potassium cyanide was a suitable electrolyte for gold and silver electroplating.
Wright's associates, George Elkington and Henry Elkington were awarded the first patents for electroplating in 1840. These two then founded the electroplating industry in Birmingham England from where it spread around the world.
Common base metals include copper, brass, nickel silver - an alloy of copper, zinc and nickel - and Britannia metal-a tin alloy with 5-10% antimony. Electroplated materials are often stamped EPNS for electroplated nickel or silver, or EPBM for electroplated Britannia metal.
Sheffield plate by the fusion process was not made in America, but factories here did turn out quantities of electroplated silver. In fact, it was so popular that one English firm with several variations of its name, but all including Dixon, sold quantities of electroplated silver, issued catalogues, and even had a New York showroom.
Today there is a great deal of American plated silver which has been treasured for years. Many families had plated silver as well as fine sterling. Some of it was inherited some prized for sentimental reasons. If you have this plated ware, and it is as dear to you as fine early silver, then you are among the happy people of this world.
On plated silver the terms 'triple' and 'quadruple' indicate the number of coatings received by the base metal in the electroplating process. Naturally the more metal used in the plating the longer the piece should last. Polishing and wear have taken their toll of much of this plated ware and whether pieces are worth replating depends on their usefulness and your pleasure in them. If you like them well enough to spend money on them, then by all means have the work done, but remember a piece is worth at market value only the metal that is in it, the base metal under the plating being worth very little.

E.P.N.S. (Electroplated Nickel Silver) and EPBM (Electroplated Britannia Metal) are the most common names attributed to silver plate items. But many other names are used for silver plate:
EPWM, Electroplate on White Metal, EPC, Electroplate On Copper, EPCA, Electro Plated Copper Alloy, EPGS - Electro Plated German Silver, EPMS - Electro Plated Magnetic Silver, African Silver, Albion Silver, Alpha Plate, Ambassador Plate, Angle Plate, Argentium, Argentine Plate, Argentum, Ascetic, Austrian Silver, Brazilian Silver, Britanoid, Cardinal Plate, Electrum, Embassy Plate, Encore, Exquisite, Insignia Plate, Kingsley Plate, New Silver, Nevada Silver, Norwegian Silver, Pelican Silver, Potosi Silver, Royal County Plate, Silva Seal, Silverite, Sonora Silver, Spur Silver, Stainless Nickel, Stainless Nickel Silver, Unity Plate, Venetian Silver, Welbeck Plate,


VeryImportantPotheads.com

Sterling Hayden the 6' 5" actor who starred in The Asphalt Jungle and played General Jack D. Ripper in Dr. Strangelove, switched from alcohol to marijuana and spoke about it late in his life.

As an OSS agent in WWII, Hayden received a Silver Star and a commendation from Marshal Tito. An early member of the Communist party, Hayden named names to the HUAC committee, a move he deeply regretted later. In 1963, he released his autobiography, Wanderer, which was praised as &ldquobeautiful&rdquo and &ldquosuperb.&rdquo

In 1972, however, the actor &ndash a longtime heavy drinker &ndash suffered what he termed a &ldquocomplete breakdown.&rdquo It wasn&rsquot until the start of the next decade that Hayden conquered his battle with the bottle, but he frankly reported that he had replaced his drinking with marijuana and hashish.

&ldquoThe main thing right now is to bring the booze under control,&rdquo Hayden told a Toronto Sun reporter in 1980. &ldquoGrass is all I do now. Grass and hash. Grass came into me and said take it easy. That&rsquos why I love it so much.&rdquo Eight months after that interview, Hayden was arrested at the Toronto International Airport after more than an ounce of hashish was found in his luggage by customs officials. The drug possession charges were later dismissed.

Hayden spent half of each year with his wife and children in Connecticut, and the other half living alone on a Dutch canal barge in France, called the Who Knows. In 1982, Hayden was the subject of an acclaimed documentary, Pharos of Chaos, which showed his life aboard the Who Knows. The film on the actor&rsquos life was his last appearance on screen. On May 1986, Hayden died following a lengthy battle with cancer.

Hayden remarried several times (even the same woman a few times) and fathered families, but escape from himself -- escape into women, into the sea, into writing -- seems to have remained a priority. Then, in the 1960s, he discovered marijuana and began escaping into himself. He described it as a means of survival, of maintaining his inner peace, when landlocked. His co-workers have said that he would load his meerschauum pipe with it anywhere and everywhere, smoking it freely without regard to its illegality, and apparently had no problems with the law about it. He spoke about pot as if it were the great illumination of his life, and he was writing a book about the role it had come to play in his life at the time his final illness was diagnosed. Unfortunately, that second volume of autobiography never surfaced.

When Sterling Hayden appeared on TOMORROW. for the third and last time, he was clearly ill, a more diminished Biblical figure. He was dressed like a hippie, in a form-fitting T-shirt (possibly tie-dyed) and a headband, and he made horrendous deep-breathing noises as he fought to dredge oxygen from his lungs between drags of his chain-smoked cigarettes. He talked about the marijuana manifesto he was trying to write, and about the difficulty of writing.


Watch the video: Sterling Hayden - Interview 1983, 12 (May 2022).